Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought my first set of tubular wheels. They fit an older bike, were cheap and wanted to give them a try. I don't race, but typically do a 75 mi ride on Saturday and maybe 1 or 2 40mi rides during the week. Wanted some basic advice:

-what is standard practice for repairing/replacing a flat on the road? is it to rip off the glued tire and replace with an unglued one and limp home, careful on corners? carry a tire and spare glue? is it possible to repair one on the road...if so, should I plan to use sealant and a pump/co2?

-any recommendations on glue versus tape for mounting the tubulars? Any brands of glue/tape that are worth using/worth avoiding?

-how long is a glued tube on a rim reliable? Should the tube be pulled and reglued after a certain amount of time?

-I've seen some information on how to patch tubulars...is there a recommended procedure for locating a puncture? I assume it's more difficult to find a hole in a tire/innertube than in a tube that is pulled out of a clincher tire.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
carry a spare glued up tire

The word I got was to carry a spare pre-glued up tire. I do that now. I took a tub and inflated it, then put three coats of glue on it (over a couple days) and just let it dry. Then I folded it up and put it in a fanny pack that I strap around my waist when ever I ride it. I have heard that the glue is good for maybe a couple years. After a year, try to pull the tire off. If it comes of easily, it needs to be reglued.
Never used sealant in the tub. I use sealant in my tubeless road tires though.

20 years (well maybe more like 30) ago I had only one bike and it had tubs on it and I repaired on the road. I never really had many flats though (I rode the crap out of that bike in the city) and I wasn't anywhere near as carefull about looking for glass as I am now.
I carried a curved needle, some glue and a patch kit. Never had a problem and thought that was the way it always was done. It took more time to patch but I remember one time I was particularilly impressed with myself for patching a leak and being back on the road in 15 minutes. I was not racing on them though so I probably wasn't putting a lot of side load on them. Did I fix them again at home? of course not, as far as I was concerned once repaired, it was repaired. Nowadays, you tell someone you patch tubs' on the road and they look at you like you are a lepper. Go figure
I find it interesting that a great amount of people don't even repair flats in clinchers, only replacing the tube.

roomservicetaco said:
Just bought my first set of tubular wheels. They fit an older bike, were cheap and wanted to give them a try. I don't race, but typically do a 75 mi ride on Saturday and maybe 1 or 2 40mi rides during the week. Wanted some basic advice:

-what is standard practice for repairing/replacing a flat on the road? is it to rip off the glued tire and replace with an unglued one and limp home, careful on corners? carry a tire and spare glue? is it possible to repair one on the road...if so, should I plan to use sealant and a pump/co2?

-any recommendations on glue versus tape for mounting the tubulars? Any brands of glue/tape that are worth using/worth avoiding?

-how long is a glued tube on a rim reliable? Should the tube be pulled and reglued after a certain amount of time?

-I've seen some information on how to patch tubulars...is there a recommended procedure for locating a puncture? I assume it's more difficult to find a hole in a tire/innertube than in a tube that is pulled out of a clincher tire.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
martinrjensen said:
The word I got was to carry a spare pre-glued up tire. I do that now. I took a tub and inflated it, then put three coats of glue on it (over a couple days) and just let it dry. Then I folded it up and put it in a fanny pack that I strap around my waist when ever I ride it. I have heard that the glue is good for maybe a couple years. After a year, try to pull the tire off. If it comes of easily, it needs to be reglued.
Never used sealant in the tub. I use sealant in my tubeless road tires though.

20 years (well maybe more like 30) ago I had only one bike and it had tubs on it and I repaired on the road. I never really had many flats though (I rode the crap out of that bike in the city) and I wasn't anywhere near as carefull about looking for glass as I am now.
I carried a curved needle, some glue and a patch kit. Never had a problem and thought that was the way it always was done. It took more time to patch but I remember one time I was particularilly impressed with myself for patching a leak and being back on the road in 15 minutes. I was not racing on them though so I probably wasn't putting a lot of side load on them. Did I fix them again at home? of course not, as far as I was concerned once repaired, it was repaired. Nowadays, you tell someone you patch tubs' on the road and they look at you like you are a lepper. Go figure
I find it interesting that a great amount of people don't even repair flats in clinchers, only replacing the tube.
Thanks. What do you use to patch the tires when on the road? Is it the same patch kit one would use on clincher tubes (round pieces of rubber with vulcanizing glue)? You put the patch on the outside of the tire, I presume?

Also, when carrying the pre-glued tires, any concern that they would stick to themselves when folded in the fanny pack?
 

·
Two wheels=freedom!
Joined
·
708 Posts
Um, no, the patch goes inside on the tube. The needle and thread mentioned were for re-sewing the casing back together.

I have been riding tubulars for about 25 years. I've got only one of my 4 road bikes on clinchers.

I use the most recent take off as a spare. The residual glue is enough to give a pretty good hold for all but the most extreme riding. It never gets totally stuck together in the seat pack I use. (Jannd makes a pack just for tubies) If I get more than one flat, I'm fubar. But I usually only flat once a year or so. Having run tubies for so long has made me automatically pretty cautious when I ride. Constantly wiping the tires with my (gloved) hand, and being uber sensitive of the road surface/debris.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
patches

Well at the time I just used the normal patch kit which seemed to work but they do make latex patches I'm sure and I think that's what most tub's are made out of. I would really investigate patching on the road though. My tire was called a sewup because the inner lining was actually sewen together. it was peretty easy to just cut the string and open it up and patch it, then sew it back together. newer tires that I have seen including the ones I am rinning now have that inner strip glued on and to get to the thread, it's probably really hard. I think technically there really are not called sewups anymore for a reason.
If the glue dries on the tires, it doesn't seem to stick to it'self but it probably will enouh to get you home on the rim.
roomservicetaco said:
Thanks. What do you use to patch the tires when on the road? Is it the same patch kit one would use on clincher tubes (round pieces of rubber with vulcanizing glue)? You put the patch on the outside of the tire, I presume?

Also, when carrying the pre-glued tires, any concern that they would stick to themselves when folded in the fanny pack?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top