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A lot of it is just personal preference, I would start so the cleat's contact point with your pedal is right on the ball of your feet and then see how that feels. You should be able to ride for a long distance without any foot discomfort although you need to take into account things like new shoes or the first time riding clipless into that equation as well.
 

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Not clear

jaseone said:
start so the cleat's contact point with your pedal is right on the ball of your feet and then see how that feels.
It would be much clearer to say that the starting postion for the cleat should be so that it places the ball of the foot over the pedal axle.

Where the cleat contacts the shoe is not relevant due to the number of different cleat designs and the lack of clarity in defining what this contact point might be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well i'm getting new shoes this week, waiting for them to arrive at lbs. sidi genuis 5. have been riding with current shoes and cleats just after of ball of foot range. just moved them all the way forward on the shoe and it seems to feel better but i quess i will keep trying moving the cleat and for and aft.

thanks

PS just got a new ride cannondale synapse (the wife bought for me)
bikes that i had 05 specialized tarmac comp, trek 1000sl
 

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How big are your feet? The "ball of foot over pedal axel" rule of thumb really only applies to people with small to mid sized feet. People with feet bigger than men's 10 or so will usually have the ball in front of the pedal axel. Long distance riders also often move their feet forward. Sprinters sometimes move their feet back so the ball is behind the axel.
 

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When I got some new shoes, I positioned the cleats a little behind (closer to the heel) where they were on the old shoes. After a few rides, I started getting ITB pain. I moved the cleats farther forward (towards the toe of the shoe) and the pain went away. I draw no general conclusions from this except to illustrate the need to experiment to find what's right for you.
 

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Do you not also have to pay attention to the location of the cleat in a side to side relation, the Q-Factor....When I had my fitting at the LBS he adjusted my cleats in such a manner to improve the tracking of my knee in relation to my foot...
 
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