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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was wondering what are the pro's and cons of various clipless pedal systems, and what do the different pro riders use.

Right now I'm using Look pedals along with 2006 Specialized BG Comp shoes and Look FQV road pedals...basically the cheapest combination available when I bought my bike, and actually the setup is quite comfortable but the straps are wearing out on the shoes and the tension on the pedals are dialed to max but feel like their on the minimum setting I can clip out so easily. I would like to hear the pro's and cons of the different style clipless pedal systems. I like the Specialized BG shoes a lot so I'll probably buy the same shoes again or maybe the next model up. Thanks.
 

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They're all good. It just depends on your personal preferences. I've honestly never ridden anything but Looks since they came out (I think) in the mid 80s.
 

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There will be a lot of arguments for and against all of them, but really, they all do the job. I'm currently on Speedplay and like them just fine. Did Crank Bros. Quattros before that - they shouldn't have stopped making them, though the cleats creaked a bit. Before that it was Shimano and Look before that.

They all do the job just fine. I do prefer dual-sided pedals, but it's a minor difference. If doing the Look style, I do prefer Shimano's cleats to the Keo style.

Haven't done the iClic stuff yet. Seems reasonable, but I don't see anything compelling.

If you aren't racing at the highest level, there's something to be said for getting a mtn pedal and a racing mtn shoe. Easier to move around when saddling up, if you do organized rides or ride far enough to want to stop at a convenience store, they're a real convenience, and if you are serious enough to ride in less than perfect weather they're a lot less slippery on damp pavement. Just not spd's. Worst pedal system going.
 

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People like to go on the internet and prove how their choice is the best but really they're just pedals and the pros/cons from brand to brand are way overblown. The ability, on not, to walk speaks for itself so I doubt you need to pros and cons of different shoes/cleat styles explained to you.
First priority should be make sure you get the float that will serve you best.
 

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la dolce vita
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I've been riding Speedplays since almost when they first came out years ago so I am biased, but they give you endless positions instead of being locked into a limited float range. People talk about wearing out the cleats, but if you oil them and don't walk miles in them they last for a long time. I just find them easy to clip in and out of and I have never had any knee problems. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Durable pedals

Doctor Who said:
I think Shimano makes the most durable pedal and cleat, but yeah, all pedals now are pretty good.
My Campy Record ProFit pedals are just about worn out. They have 110,000 miles (177,000 km) on them. My current Campy cleats have 43,000 miles (69,000 km) on them and they're just about worn out too. What's the mileage on your Shimano pedals and cleats?
 

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Kerry Irons said:
My Campy Record ProFit pedals are just about worn out. They have 110,000 miles (177,000 km) on them. My current Campy cleats have 43,000 miles (69,000 km) on them and they're just about worn out too. What's the mileage on your Shimano pedals and cleats?
It's kind of hard to do an apples to apples comparison of pedals/cleats based on miles. That doesn't take into account the guy who rides centuries and long group rides and doesn't clip in and out like the guy who rides many short rides and is in/out of them multiple times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yeah I tend to ride solo short rides, rather then long group rides...actually never road in a group. I usually do 10-16 miles during the week before the sun goes down and 20-30 miles on Saturday and Sunday and I un-clip probably a dozen times a ride for stop signs and traffic lights. Probably every 2-3 miles or so, during the longer 20-30 mile rides there is a long road 10 miles long with 2 traffic lights if I'm lucky can catch them both green. The cleats only lasted me a few thousand miles but the pedals are probably around 10,000 miles or so. I just read about the Look upgrade discount on the front page http://reviews.roadbikereview.com/blog/look-pedal-trade-in-trade-up/ might take advantage of that.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
My Campy Record ProFit pedals are just about worn out. They have 110,000 miles (177,000 km) on them. My current Campy cleats have 43,000 miles (69,000 km) on them and they're just about worn out too. What's the mileage on your Shimano pedals and cleats?
I got 60,000 mi. on my original Look deltas and they were still fine...that is until I damaged one in a crash. I've been riding on Keos since then with no issues. I do have to replace the cleats once per year. i don't know how long the Keos will last, but they seem very similar to the deltas.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
My Campy Record ProFit pedals are just about worn out. They have 110,000 miles (177,000 km) on them. My current Campy cleats have 43,000 miles (69,000 km) on them and they're just about worn out too. What's the mileage on your Shimano pedals and cleats?
Nobody beats the whiz!
 

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Mr. Versatile said:
They're all good. It just depends on your personal preferences. I've honestly never ridden anything but Looks since they came out (I think) in the mid 80s.
Yeah really.

Personally, I got a mountain bike with Ritchey Logics over 10 years ago, and I've been using Ritcheys ever since for everything, mtb, road, cx, and etc. In fact I'm still using those 10+ year old mtb pedals on one bike. Same cleat works for all of them. Can easily install on any shoe, including recessed cleat shoes. The newer Ritchey pedal designs are an improvement, but no complaints about any I've used really. Their road pedal is quite minimal and lightweight too. Plus, I don't think I've ever paid more than $50 for a set of pedals.
 

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Jason1500 said:
yeah I tend to ride solo short rides, rather then long group rides...actually never road in a group. I usually do 10-16 miles during the week before the sun goes down and 20-30 miles on Saturday and Sunday and I un-clip probably a dozen times a ride for stop signs and traffic lights. Probably every 2-3 miles or so, during the longer 20-30 mile rides there is a long road 10 miles long with 2 traffic lights if I'm lucky can catch them both green. The cleats only lasted me a few thousand miles but the pedals are probably around 10,000 miles or so. I just read about the Look upgrade discount on the front page http://reviews.roadbikereview.com/blog/look-pedal-trade-in-trade-up/ might take advantage of that.
FYI...you can order the LOOK Keo 2's from PBK for $98 plus 10% discount, plus free shipping.

That trade in "deal" means you lose a current set of pedals and still have to pay $135 for the Keos. Doesn't seem too sweet to me...
 

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Jason1500 said:
yeah I tend to ride solo short rides, rather then long group rides...actually never road in a group. I usually do 10-16 miles during the week before the sun goes down and 20-30 miles on Saturday and Sunday and I un-clip probably a dozen times a ride for stop signs and traffic lights. Probably every 2-3 miles or so, during the longer 20-30 mile rides there is a long road 10 miles long with 2 traffic lights if I'm lucky can catch them both green. The cleats only lasted me a few thousand miles but the pedals are probably around 10,000 miles or so. I just read about the Look upgrade discount on the front page http://reviews.roadbikereview.com/blog/look-pedal-trade-in-trade-up/ might take advantage of that.
Sounds like a good plan, if you are familiar with and like the Look mechanism.

I un-clip probably a dozen times a ride for stop signs and traffic lights
.

Gotta work on that trackstand. Real roadies don't unclip at stop signs. ;-) (well, a lot of 'em don't stop -- but I won't endorse that).
 

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As far as I'm concerned they all work pretty well. E.G. A heck of a lot of riders in my "club" use SPD compatible double sided pedals (whether they're the 520's or XTR level I don't know) with Sidi's MTB race shoes. Including our "latest and greatest" guy on his Kuota KOM with DuraAce Di2.

The notion that you need a "large platform" for support is, I believe, given the lie by all the pros who ride on Speedplays. That "lollypop" is quite small and the cleat doesn't add much, if any, stiffness to the shoe sole. Modern cycling shoes, particularly those with carbon soles, are so stiff you could be standing on a nail and not notice.
 

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Mr. Versatile said:
They're all good. It just depends on your personal preferences. I've honestly never ridden anything but Looks since they came out (I think) in the mid 80s.
I bought my first set, Shimano Ultegra, in the Eighties. They were actually rebranded Looks. The old style cleats with no float sucked. Once I switched to the new cleats I must admit there's no reason for me to switch.
 

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I prefer double sided or eggbeater peddles. Helps a heck of alot when you make frequent stops on steep inclines, with the need to power out very rapidly to avoid being run down by a car.
 
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