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50ft. Queenie
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this kinda erked me:

Team manager Olaf Ludwig: "We suspended Jan Ullrich, Oscar Sevilla and Rudy Pevenage for the time being. Of course, it's up to them to prove their innocence."

really? is that how it works?

so i could write "JAN" on a ziplock bag, call spain & get him thrown out of the tour?


im not saying he didnt do it...but man, that statement just rubs me the wrong way.
how about them having to prove the rider is guilty??
 

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Read the rest of the interview. They were provided compelling evidence that the three lied about their relationship with Fuentes, after signing documents that guaranteed they had nothing to do with him or blood doping. I assume there are sureveillance images of them visiting the doc, plus DNA matched blood samples. When Ludwig says that they must prove their innocence, I think he's really just saying they're guilty as hell and they've got proof.
 
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Lost in translation, quirks of European legal systems - I dunno, but I've read "prove innocence" so many times I think I'll be nervous the next time I travel to Europe.
 

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argylesocks said:
this kinda erked me:

Team manager Olaf Ludwig: "We suspended Jan Ullrich, Oscar Sevilla and Rudy Pevenage for the time being. Of course, it's up to them to prove their innocence."

really? is that how it works?

so i could write "JAN" on a ziplock bag, call spain & get him thrown out of the tour?


im not saying he didnt do it...but man, that statement just rubs me the wrong way.
how about them having to prove the rider is guilty??
It sounds like the guys named have some pretty concrete evidence against them in the official report. Valverde apparently has some circumstantial evidnce against him, but that wasn't enough to get him booted. And presumption of innocence is an American jurisprudence principle and I believe, not a principle in many European legal systems. Furthermore, cycling teams and a privately organized race even in the US wouldn't be under any obligation to follow "innocent to proven guilty".
 

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BikerFox Wannabe
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Why?

AJL said:
....I dunno, but I've read "prove innocence" so many times I think I'll be nervous the next time I travel to Europe.
Do you plan on a regime of PED doping as a member of a Pro Tour team?

This isn't a criminal investigation (in regards to the Tour or the management of the teams involving Basso, Ullrich and Mancebo), the riders and pro teams all signed a charter that basically outlined the expectations that they remain above suspicion and probable implication in doping. The charter lists what the consequences of being implicated in doping will be. Basso, Ullrich, Mancebo and etc. have been seriously, with a perponderance of evidence (evidently), implicated in Operation Puerto.
Thus the 'rules' are being enforced. If Ullrich can prove his innocence he will be re-instated. If not he's out of employment. No one is throwing him in prison. He's not facing (at the moment anyway) criminal charges.

Everyone needs to keep this in perspective. These guys are multi-millionaires. Their comfortable lifestyles are not immediatley being threatened. However, their future financial situations just took an almost certain turn for the worst. Still, I don't think any of them will starve.

How 'bout Mancebo? Sounds like he's had enough of the whole pro cycling/doping merry-go-round and is jumping off the ship.
 
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