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... R U talking about swapping a freewheel mech or the cogset?

If you're swapping the cogset (so that the chain/cog interface remains the same) then it's fairly simple and straightforward with the right toolz. If you're swapping out a freewheel (freehub?), things could get complicated depending on it's vintage and make.
 

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Akirasho said:
... R U talking about swapping a freewheel mech or the cogset?

If you're swapping the cogset (so that the chain/cog interface remains the same) then it's fairly simple and straightforward with the right toolz. If you're swapping out a freewheel (freehub?), things could get complicated depending on it's vintage and make.

sorry. cog only.

i looked on park tool's web site, and it seems straight forward.
pull one nut and it's off. i think i have those tools as well.
 

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rsosborn said:
sorry. cog only.

i looked on park tool's web site, and it seems straight forward.
pull one nut and it's off. i think i have those tools as well.
... just be careful reinstalling the locknut/ring as it's possible to strip the threads if U manhandle the installation...
 

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rsosborn said:
i'm about to swap out my first wheelset. i have a basic set of "spin doctor" tools. i believe this includes a freewheel puller, if i read the description right. is this a hard thing to do?
What you're probably intending to do is remove the cassette? Or is it a freewheel?

Assuming it's a cassette -you need three tools:

Cassette lockring adapter - cheap, about $5
Large wrench that fits the above tool (I use a large adjustabale jaw (aka crescent) wrench or just a big socket) Hopefully you'll have one...everyone should have a BFCW (big f'in crescent wrench)
Chain whip. Also relatively cheap - about $10.

To put a cassette on you only need the first two listed above.

Both removal and replacement are about an easy a DIY task as you can find. Just line up the splines when putting it on.

Oh, to replace the cassette and tighten the locknut, a torque spec is printed on the locknut (probably). So, it is handy to have a torque wrench. In the past I just tightened "very tight" and never had a problem. When I finally got a torque wrench and checked it, my "very tight" was quite a bit under the recommended torque. If you - like me - are swapping two sets of wheels with the same size cassette on both sets, I found that torquing properly helped make the two sets consistent in spacing so that minimal or no derailleur adjustment is needed.
 
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