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NeoRetroGrouch
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any difference/preferences for the 3-hole adapter with 2-hole cleat vs the 3-hole cleat? Quattro pedal going on Sidi Genius. - TF
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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TurboTurtle said:
Any difference/preferences for the 3-hole adapter with 2-hole cleat vs the 3-hole cleat? Quattro pedal going on Sidi Genius. - TF
I don't know why you'd want to use the adaptor if you didn't have to. I got rid of it when I changed to Genius 5s from my Specialized (and had to lower my saddle, of course), and I preferred it. Not from a function standpoint, but from being able to quickly adjust the cleat position--with the adaptor, you have to remove the cleat, shift the base plate, then put the cleat back on.

I'd go without.
 

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eminence grease
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TurboTurtle said:
Any difference/preferences for the 3-hole adapter with 2-hole cleat vs the 3-hole cleat? Quattro pedal going on Sidi Genius. - TF
I'm using the 2 hole cleat alone with MTB shoes on my single speed. The "three hole" cleat is nothing more than a slightly different 2 hole cleat on a 3 hole plate with the screws mounted from the underside. In both cases you're using an adapter plate which are pretty close to identical. The mounting and adjustment are the same. As far as how the cleats themselves work, both are fine.
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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TurboTurtle said:
Any difference/preferences for the 3-hole adapter with 2-hole cleat vs the 3-hole cleat? Quattro pedal going on Sidi Genius. - TF
I use the 2-hole, like it very much.

I've heard that the 3-hole is slightly less adjustable on the sole of the shoe. Can't say for sure, but it kinda looks that way from the pictures. Also depends on how big the 2-hole slots on the shoes are.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
bikeboy389 said:
I don't know why you'd want to use the adaptor if you didn't have to. I got rid of it when I changed to Genius 5s from my Specialized (and had to lower my saddle, of course), and I preferred it. Not from a function standpoint, but from being able to quickly adjust the cleat position--with the adaptor, you have to remove the cleat, shift the base plate, then put the cleat back on.

I'd go without.
The adjustment for both looks the same?? - TF

http://www.crankbrothers.com/3hole_cleat.php?itemId=

http://www.crankbrothers.com/3hole_adapter.php?itemId=74660
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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6,493 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
danl1 said:
I use the 2-hole, like it very much.

I've heard that the 3-hole is slightly less adjustable on the sole of the shoe. Can't say for sure, but it kinda looks that way from the pictures. Also depends on how big the 2-hole slots on the shoes are.
Shoes only have 3-hole mount. Getting a 2-hole mount from Sidi would take forever. - TF
 

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eminence grease
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TurboTurtle said:
Shoes only have 3-hole mount. Getting a 2-hole mount from Sidi would take forever. - TF
The two options you have are virtually identical. The only difference is the shape of the cleat and how it attaches to the plate. And whether or not you want to use the snap on "pontoons" which are available only on the "Quatro cleat." You don't need anything from Sidi, the CB cleats come this way.
 

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lint picker
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139 Posts
danl1 said:
I use the 2-hole, like it very much.

I've heard that the 3-hole is slightly less adjustable on the sole of the shoe. Can't say for sure, but it kinda looks that way from the pictures. Also depends on how big the 2-hole slots on the shoes are.
This is very true - I pronate and I'd like to be able to angle the cleats inward a bit more (so that my feet point out an extra degree or two). I've considered punching out an extra milimeter of gap on the top hole (closest to the tip of the shoe) so that I can accomplish this. As it is, I can angle the cleat out about 3 degrees. This may be enough for most people.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the 5 degrees of float (at least in my experience across two pairs of stainless steel eggbeaters across two different bikes, with two different shoes - one shoe older than the other, with more established cleats), is not fully realized until the cleats are worn in for a few hundred miles. Initially, the feeling of auto-centering is more significant.

In short, if you are someone who needs lots of float or the ability to pronate to a large degree, you may want to test out the 2-hole and 3-hole cleats before committing.

Finally, I do use the 3-hole, pontooned cleat setup on my road bike. The plastic pontoons protect the cleat from hitting asphalt, but they also don't seem to be the most durable plastic around. After about five hundred miles of usage they look very thrashed and I'm sure the cleat will outlast them.
 
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