Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I've read that you have to burn about 3500 Calories to drop a lb of fat.

When we're eating, a gram of fat is about 9 Calories and a gram of protein or carb is about 4 calories.

Does this ratio apply when burning calories too? If I go out and ride 3500 Calories (based on PT kJ) some will be from fat and some from carb stores, so would actual fuel consumed be greater than a lb?

Thanks!
 

·
NeoRetroGrouch
Joined
·
6,493 Posts
android said:
So, I've read that you have to burn about 3500 Calories to drop a lb of fat.

When we're eating, a gram of fat is about 9 Calories and a gram of protein or carb is about 4 calories.

Does this ratio apply when burning calories too? If I go out and ride 3500 Calories (based on PT kJ) some will be from fat and some from carb stores, so would actual fuel consumed be greater than a lb?

Thanks!
True, but any stored carbs will be replaced with the same amount after the ride so carb weight will remain unchanged. - TF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
android said:
So, I've read that you have to burn about 3500 Calories to drop a lb of fat.

When we're eating, a gram of fat is about 9 Calories and a gram of protein or carb is about 4 calories.

Does this ratio apply when burning calories too? If I go out and ride 3500 Calories (based on PT kJ) some will be from fat and some from carb stores, so would actual fuel consumed be greater than a lb?

Thanks!
Yes, probably considerably more. Since for most people even at relatively low work rates that would be considered exercise you're burning somewhere around 50/50 carbs/fat (with a constant of about 5% protein).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
Actually....3500 calories just equals a pound of fat.

People confuse that fact and replace it with....you need to burn 3500 calories to burn a pound of fat.

You are correct in that when you work out you are burning all three, though at different rates. Also remember your body stores enough carbs for about 90 minutes of activity...so at the beginning of a ride, mostly you are burning carbs and not fat.

In the end it still comes down to calories in vs. calories out to lose weight....some people don't understand the ratios though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Let's not forget the overall beneficial effect of exercise on your metabolism.

But the best K.I.S.S. method of losing weight is: More calories burnt than calories consumed. Pretty easy, really. Just make sure the calories you eat aren't a bunch of junk - you don't see guys putting 87 octane in high compression race motors, right?
 

·
No Crybabies
Joined
·
11,692 Posts
excess burning

Wookiebiker said:
Actually....3500 calories just equals a pound of fat.
Isn't it that you need to burn 3500 *more* calories than you would normally consume and burn, to lose a pound of fat? In other words, if you normally consume 2500 calories per day and burn that amount, also, then you need to burn 3500 more to lose a pound of fat.

If you are riding hard and/or long, I think you burn quite a bit more following your ride, too.
 

·
No Crybabies
Joined
·
11,692 Posts
bottom line

*A-Train* said:
Or you could cut back 500 calories a day as well as burn 500 calories a day. There's 1000 calories, in just one day.
I think the bottom line issue for anyone having problems losing weight, especially while training, is that we way underestimate the number of calories we consume. It's a real pain to count them, though. When I did for one period of time, I was shocked at how much I had been eating. Can't say I should have been shocked, as I was managing to maintain or gain weight while riding 250 miles per week. (I know, the flip side is that we also over estimate the number of miles we ride ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
Fixed said:
Isn't it that you need to burn 3500 *more* calories than you would normally consume and burn, to lose a pound of fat? In other words, if you normally consume 2500 calories per day and burn that amount, also, then you need to burn 3500 more to lose a pound of fat.

If you are riding hard and/or long, I think you burn quite a bit more following your ride, too.
A pound of fat has 3500 kcal of energy in it. It follows then from basic thermodynamic laws of physics then that in order for you to lose a pound of fat you must have a net energy deficit of 3500 calories, whether over a day, a week, a month or whatever.

Your burn a little more calories following exercise not quite a bit more. Typically less than 10% if not well less than 5% of whatever you burned during exercise.
 

·
I ride in circles..
Joined
·
4,990 Posts
After you work out you might lose slightly more for a while like mentioned already.. But as you get in better shape.. get more muscle.. and need more energy throughout the day just to survive you'll increase you BMR.. but as you lose weight you decrease your BMR..

I've lost 40 pounds since the beginning of the year.. I lost a lot really fast. Then tapered off. Now I'm settling and haven't lost much in a while. However I'm shrinking in all areas except my calfs and thighs. I keep adding muscle and losing fat.

I did this by averaging a 500 to 1500 calorie a day deficit and burning a lot with working out. I never went hungry..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
Much easier said than done

*A-Train* said:
Or you could cut back 500 calories a day as well as burn 500 calories a day. There's 1000 calories, in just one day.
Yeah, but most people would be very hungry under those conditions, and therefore find it hard to maintain that kind of daily deficit over a long period. Some folks would also find their training abilities compromised with that kind of daily deficit.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top