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Cycling induced anoesis
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of purchasing Easton's EA90 SL wheels but am concerned about the method used to replace cartridge bearings. I'm familiar with overhauls of hubs with loose balls, but have no experience with pressed in bearings like the Easton's. I've checked the online manuals and the process seems straighforward, but I'd like some input from the folks that have done this first hand. Have you used the bearing drifts? Was it difficult? Simple? TIA!
 

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If you can replace the bearings in a Dura Ace 7800 or FSA MegaExo crankset, then changing hub bearings should not be a problem.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ms6073 said:
If you can replace the bearings in a Dura Ace 7800 or FSA MegaExo crankset, then changing hub bearings should not be a problem.
Thanks for the reply. Not specifically the brands and/ or models you've mentioned, but I have replaced bearing in everything from headsets, hubs, BB's, freewheels and pedals, but they were either loose or had retainers, never the cartridge type needing pressing. That's the part that's new to me. I'm also curious just how long cartridge bearing last, generally speaking.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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The Easton EA90 SL shouldn't need overhauling. Ever because the R4 hubs are designed not to be. At least from reading their tech docs.
 

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Agreed that the bearings should not need overhauling thus the only reason one would need to replace bearings would be to substitute with hybrid ceramics which would be aided by the appropriate bearing drifts and maybe a bearing press tool. Unless the OP has multiple bikes to maintain or plans on replacing cartridge bearings on a routine basis, this is one item that would be better left to the LBS. As for how hard the replacement process is, can't speak to the R4 hubs, but with the R3 and Circuit hubs, the hardest part was removing the old bearings and once these were out, the new bearings went in in minutes using the bearing drifts and a quick release sans spring.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ms6073 said:
Agreed that the bearings should not need overhauling thus the only reason one would need to replace bearings would be to substitute with hybrid ceramics which would be aided by the appropriate bearing drifts and maybe a bearing press tool. Unless the OP has multiple bikes to maintain or plans on replacing cartridge bearings on a routine basis, this is one item that would be better left to the LBS. As for how hard the replacement process is, can't speak to the R4 hubs, but with the R3 and Circuit hubs, the hardest part was removing the old bearings and once these were out, the new bearings went in in minutes using the bearing drifts and a quick release sans spring.
I actually prefer to do my own wrenching whenever possible, thus my original question.

From what I could gather from the online tech manuals, the process for bearing removal/ replacement is the same or very similar for the R4/ R3/ Circuit hubs, so your statement makes me a little more comfortable that I could perform this maintenance. Which leads me to the question... are the bearing drifts available at the LBS, online, from Easton?

As far a longevity or the need to replace (bearings), I'm a firm believer in nothing lasts forever (and I tend to keep things almost that long), so I'll most likely be doing some replacing if I buy the wheelset. BTW, they're on sale at Jenson for $500 - seems a good deal.
 

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Until recently when we started running Reynolds carbon clinchers, Easton was the only wheels you would find on my bike. A couple years ago when I had a bearing get a flat spot with a set of Easton Circuits (we have/had Easton Circuits, Tempest II clinchers, Tempest II tubulars), when I called customer service (aka Velomax in California), I was able to purchase both the bearings and the drifts to replace the bearings. While I think Easton customer service is good, as far as the wheel division is concerned I have always gotten the impression that it is a small shop with a limited number of personnel. On the rare occasion I have had to call for service, the phone calls are typically always handled by personnel working in the warehouse building or repairing wheels.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
ms6073 said:
Until recently when we started running Reynolds carbon clinchers, Easton was the only wheels you would find on my bike. A couple years ago when I had a bearing get a flat spot with a set of Easton Circuits (we have/had Easton Circuits, Tempest II clinchers, Tempest II tubulars), when I called customer service (aka Velomax in California), I was able to purchase both the bearings and the drifts to replace the bearings. While I think Easton customer service is good, as far as the wheel division is concerned I have always gotten the impression that it is a small shop with a limited number of personnel. On the rare occasion I have had to call for service, the phone calls are typically always handled by personnel working in the warehouse building or repairing wheels.
Good info - thanks for sharing..
It dawned on me that I didn't ask the obvious. Some types of wheelsets require that they be sent out for truing/ spoke replacement. Is this the case for the Easton's, or can a LBS perform these tasks. (One thing I don't mess with is wheel truiing).
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ms6073 said:
I think the answer depends on whether or not Easton is still using green Loctite on the spoke threads.
Fair enough. When in doubt, go the direct route, so I emailed Easton's wheel service department. Thanks for your help with this.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
For anyone interested, I got this email response back from Easton regarding their wheelsets and servicing required.

Any competent wheel builder can work on the wheels. They use a standard nipple and straight pull spoke that can be obtained from most bike shops or direct from Easton Sports Inc.

A wheels performance is directly related to the quality of the build so it is important to have it done correctly, however this can be achieved at home or at the service center.


But now I got derailed and am looking at ROL wheels, which I know nothing about, have heard almost nothing about, except that they seem to get great reviews, so....
any comments on them?? :confused:
It would be between the Race SL's, D'huez and Volant's.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Trust me, whatever hoops you buy, you'll be happy until they break. At least that's how the story goes with any expensive wheelset.

Just buy something that suits you, it really doesn't matter what brand. I do urge you to really think about the bearings though. Mavic always has crazy bearings... even on their cheap wheels. I guess they've been doing this for so long, but my next wheelset is probably going to be the EA90 SL/SLX since my bike is Easton nearly everything. I'm superficial like that.
 
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