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GeoCyclist said:
I am curious if alternating between a Road bike and Recumbent bike will affect your Road bike cycling form? Do any of you race Road bikes, and recreational cycle on a recumbent?
I don't actually race Raod bikes but I owned a recumbent through out 2002 and found for me that recumbent riding definately affected my foot placement comfort when I returned to upright road bike riding. I ended up selling mine because I was having so much problems getting back in the grove and feeling comfortable. I also would loose the arm/shoulder/neck conditioning as well as saddle soreness from lack of conditioning. I enjoyed it and often wish I still had it but for me there were too many negatives.
 

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GeoCyclist
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Along the lines of what I was thinking...

A friend of mine bought two Bents. He was asking if I wanted to go cycling on one of his bikes. I'm considering giving it a try next month. I just don't want to get the Bent bug if it's going to affect my racing.

Thanks for the info!
 

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GeoCyclist said:
I am curious if alternating between a Road bike and Recumbent bike will affect your Road bike cycling form? Do any of you race Road bikes, and recreational cycle on a recumbent?
As you probably already know, you do indeed recruit muscle groups in different ways while aboard a 'bent. I don't have any absolute specifics... but in my experience... you can do both... but the amount of time spent on each would be dependent on your own abilites and needs along with the specific "type" of recumbent (the term "recumbent is very generic... so if you're in the market, you'll need to explore which type suits your needs best).

http://www.recumbents.com

Many folks banter around the idea of needing about 1500 miles to develop "recumbent legs"... and for me, that was a fair estimate (about 70/30 recumbent riding during my first season aboard). This may be more a matter of technique and muscle memory... since climbing and sprinting (yes, you can sprint aboard a 'bent... you just won't win (against an upright... under "normal" conditions)) require a different tack.

About the only racing I do are time trials... but I do go on "competitive" training rides from time to time... and find the transition relatively easy (again, depending on the 'bent/upright mix).

For me... a recumbent is kind of a necessity... due to health problems.... I need and use the 'bent as a cross training platform.
 

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There's a guy I sometimes run into on the MUT that commutes on his bent and does big weekend/charity rides on his upright. He's in his early 60s I guess and he absolutely hauls on his bent (mid 20 mph avg). He's been cycling for many years and he likes the bent for commuting because the MUT is flat and he feels faster and more comfortable on it, he also enjoys being different. He likes his upright bike for his weekend rides because of hills and group-ride dynamics.

He clearly has no trouble switching back and forth between bikes.
 

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GeoCyclist
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The need for speed!

The bent that I'm going to ride is the equivelent of a Cross bike in the bent world. I've done a bit of research and I'd really like to go for a ride on a P38 Lightening. Yes, I like to go FAST!!!

Thanks for the Info!
 

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No personal experience

I meet a guy on a brevet last year. He had purchased the Greenspeed recumbent tandem to cycle with his son who could not ride a standard frame. After working his legs to "recumbent" form, he got himself a solo. I rode with him for 50-60 miles at the end of 200K, he was plenty fast !!!!
 
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