Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tomorrow, I'm going to check out and more than likely buy a road bike from a friend. He's selling me a 58cm Tommasini with DuraAce components for $500. It's a 13-14 years old bike, but in great shape.

My most pressing question is that the bike doesn't have pedals and I was wondering what you guys would recommend? Also, if there any other tips or suggestions about anything in general with biking, please fire away. A bit about me: I'm primarily a runner and compete in marathons and am doing my first 50-mile ultramarathon next month. I still plan on running being my number one sport, but would like to add biking as a form of cross-training and do it 1-3 times a week. I'm 6'1" and weigh around 175 lbs.

Thanks!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Make sure it fits, first, then....

JamieoftheNorth said:
Tomorrow, I'm going to check out and more than likely buy a road bike from a friend. He's selling me a 58cm Tommasini with DuraAce components for $500. It's a 13-14 years old bike, but in great shape.

My most pressing question is that the bike doesn't have pedals and I was wondering what you guys would recommend? Also, if there any other tips or suggestions about anything in general with biking, please fire away. A bit about me: I'm primarily a runner and compete in marathons and am doing my first 50-mile ultramarathon next month. I still plan on running being my number one sport, but would like to add biking as a form of cross-training and do it 1-3 times a week. I'm 6'1" and weigh around 175 lbs.
!
That price seems high to me, but I don't really keep up, so if somebody else says it's OK, they may be right.
The most important feature on any bike is fit. I'm 6'4" and ride 64 or 65cm road frames, and to me a 58 sounds too small for you. If you can't get full leg extension and a comfortable reach to the bars, you'll have to make some changes. It's possible to make it work, sort of, with seatpost and stem swaps, but it's going to add $100 or so. The handlebars might also be too narrow, if you're substantially bigger than the old owner.
As for pedals, I think I'd slap on a set of $20 platforms with toe clips for awhile until you get yourself dialed in. I still have those on most of my bikes, because I like ride in shoes I can walk in. You'll learn a lot the first few weeks, from riding and talking to other riders, and then you'll have some idea what you want. Full disclosure, though: I'm not a big fan of clipless pedals for most riding. Others opinions may differ.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,302 Posts
I think that 13-14 year old frame plus all dura ace in very good condition or better is a good deal at $500. You will get a lot of use out of that frame and those components. As far as size I will say my brother is a tad under 6 ft, rides a 58 cm cannondale and it is slightly big for him. I think you have a good chance that that frame can work for you without having to go extreme on stem length, seatpost extension, seat all the way back, etc. Let us know after you've ridden it what you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,524 Posts
For your height and the size of the bike you will need to raise the saddle pretty high. If the bike has a traditional quill stem you'll also be able to raise the bars a bit. Even then, you could be reaching down 2, 3, or more inches from the top of the saddle to the top of the bars.

Limber folks can do that, and many cyclists can after riding for a couple years of riding, but for lots of guys that downward reach leads to sore shoulders & backs after an hour or two on the bike. Also, you're likely to feel a bit squeezed by the relatively short horizontal distance between the saddle and the bars. Depending on your flexibility, that downward reach would be a deal-killer for me...

$500 for a 13 yr old Dura Ace bike could be an OK price. A $500 bike that doesn't fit is a waste of money.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,302 Posts
a thirteen year old tomassinni with columbus SLX or TSX (or more recent high end)tubing in excellent condition with dura ace in excellent condition is a steal for $500!

pay more to what the others say on sizing, I'm 5'9".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the great tips so far, I really appreciate it. I'm really looking forward to giving it a whirl. Would an inseam measurement give a better idea for a fit than height? Mine is 32". Of course, I'll probably have a much better idea after tomorrow when I check it out in real life!

So, what kind of pedals? Given that the bike fits, I'd like to get some clipless ones. I used to mountain bike some in college, and got to the point where I couldn't stand straps! So, I think clipless would be a worthwhile investment. Any brands/models that are good to start with?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,238 Posts
I'm 6' with a 32" inseam and ride 59 c-t with a short stem. That bike should be a good fit for you. You will find out for sure when you ride it. I ride Crank Bros. Quattros. These were my first clipless. Very easy to get in and out of. My Sidi mountain shoes are no heavier or more clunky than a regular road shoe and I can walk in them.
 

·
keep rubber side down
Joined
·
624 Posts
pedals

Looks like a good deal on the bike if it was well taken care of. Still. have a look at the wheels. Also replacing sprokets, chains should be budgeted maybe?

Pedals? really, do you have friends who ride? It's always fun, when fitting is not too far off, to try a friend's bike on the go... Perhaps you have friends around you who use a specific model.

Honestly; Look pedals are quite popular and you can find great deal on them since they recently introduced the KEO norm. The "old" norm still is the reference... I personnaly find them more durable and better than Shimano SPD road norm. (I've used all of them. Lately I use the new Keo and love them, exept some of the less common but very good Speedplay)

But before you spend a lot of money, if you already have a decent light-ish MTB pedal and shoe... use them to get to 'know the bike' before investing in the hard core stuff.

The entry level pedals will always be a good choice to start, but you will eventuely upgrade after sufficient mileage, as they will feel rough and servicing them will convince you. Still a good choice to go with the inexpensive stuff. Same with the shoes. If it comes to it, you'll buy better one and use those in the bad weather/training situation.

back to the bike: SLX Columbus tubing, if it is what the bike is made of, is excellent, pretty much timeless. But it's the componentry you want to look at. Have your friend explain what you'd need to replace, and when.

ta!



JamieoftheNorth said:
Thanks for the great tips so far, I really appreciate it. I'm really looking forward to giving it a whirl. Would an inseam measurement give a better idea for a fit than height? Mine is 32". Of course, I'll probably have a much better idea after tomorrow when I check it out in real life!

So, what kind of pedals? Given that the bike fits, I'd like to get some clipless ones. I used to mountain bike some in college, and got to the point where I couldn't stand straps! So, I think clipless would be a worthwhile investment. Any brands/models that are good to start with?
 

·
Collin's Dad
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
As far as the price goes, are all the components 13yr old also?

I think some people may be differing on their opinion of "good deal" and "sounds a little high" based no the age and mileage on the components. 9-10spd dura-ace then it's steal, I'm not too sure on the value on the older components, maybe try the retro board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,160 Posts
don't...

If the parts are as old as the bike, getting certain repair parts may be tough. Drivetrains have changed a lot since then. Better to spend a little more and get contemporary components. Got to your local shop and look for bikes with shimano 105.

Pedals are a very individual thing. There aren't many bad ones out there. Using clip-in pedals for the first time can be tricky. Personally I prefer Speedplay that has two sides that you simple step on to clip in. Very simple. Some designs are single sided and require the front of the cleat to be hooked under the front edge of the pedal. A lot more hassle, IMO.
 

·
Arrogant roadie.....
Joined
·
4,232 Posts
Frame sizing is getting smaller these days, but an early 90's 58cm frame is probably a tad small for you.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top