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I plan to go cross country from Nashville, TN to California. I have an eddy merckx cross bike with bontrager tires and focus rims. I planned on maybe using simply a back rack or maybe a trailer. I would prefer just to use racks. The problem is i dont think i can work up any front rack because of the carbon forks. And I dont know what I could get for a back rack that would be beefy enough to handle a 3000 mile+ trip. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Panniers on a racing bike is a dead end discussion. Get a trailer and ride whatever bike you insist on. A Burley Nomad or a Quikpak would be great choices if you intend to stay on paved roads. The Quikpak has larger diameter wheels and rolls easier. Google it, I'm too lazy to find the link.

I know guys who rode cross country for fraternity fundraisers, on racing bikes, back in the day. But the van was carrying all their stuff. That sounds nice too...
 

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loftyone said:
the point is i do not want a tourning bike. I want to do it on a racing bike.
All sorts of problems with a rack and panniers on a race bike (all of them solved by pulling a BOB trailer).

Let's list a few of the potential issues; Heel strike on the panniers because of the short chainstays. Finding a sturdy rack that can be mounted without sway. All that weight on the rear wheel causing broken spokes. Stability at speed with the short wheelbase and upright angles of a race bike (yes, cyclo-cross bikes are race bikes). Lots more I am sure....

That being said, of course you can go cross country with a load on a race bike.
 

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If you have it in your mind to use your racing bike for this trip, I have a suggestion. Buy a cheap nashbar seatpost, and permanently mount the seatpost rack to the seatpost. I did that with a seatpost that I did not care about. It kept my seatpost rack, and bag from moving around.

Also, I tried 3 different types of seatpost racks. They come in different lengths. I would buy the longest one. For me, I did not like having my rack trunk close to my seat. Trek makes a pretty long seatpost rack.
 

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slowrider said:
If you have it in your mind to use your racing bike for this trip, I have a suggestion. Buy a cheap nashbar seatpost, and permanently mount the seatpost rack to the seatpost. I did that with a seatpost that I did not care about. It kept my seatpost rack, and bag from moving around.

Also, I tried 3 different types of seatpost racks. They come in different lengths. I would buy the longest one. For me, I did not like having my rack trunk close to my seat. Trek makes a pretty long seatpost rack.
How much weight did you carry on your seatpost rack? Did you use panniers with it? How did you keep the panniers from swinging into the rear wheel? What was your longest ride with a load on the rack? How did it effect the balance of the bike to have the weight up high?
 

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The keyword is "Stable". I tried 3 different racks on 3 different bikes (Road, Rigid MTB, Hybrid). The most stable was the hybrid because I permanently attached the rack to the seatpost.

I was only carrying about 20 pounds. Also, I was using a rack trunk. Which put the weight up higher. All things being equal, I prefer using a rack attached to the rack mounts on my bikes. Out of the saddle, everything I did had to be under control (Stable first. Speed second). My longest ride was 30 miles on a mostly flat road.

Out of the saddle, climbing uphill, into the wind, with a seatpost rack, plus 30 pounds? Would not be the most ideal or comfortable way to ride cross country.
 
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