Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Satanic Watch Winder
Joined
·
4,839 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I've gone back through the Forum Archives about rain jackets, but I have one question that is never completely answered. Is there a rain specific jacket that will shed water and not cook me between 55 and 65 degrees, or does a cyclist simply put out too much heat and sweat in that temperature range for any fabric to disperse?
 

·
cantankerous old man
Joined
·
121 Posts
At 55-65, you're on the border of not needing a jacket, so you may just want to get wet.

However, if you're on a longer ride and won't be hammering, then something like a Showerspass Elite may be right up your alley
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,890 Posts
oily666 said:
OK, I've gone back through the Forum Archives about rain jackets, but I have one question that is never completely answered. Is there a rain specific jacket that will shed water and not cook me between 55 and 65 degrees, or does a cyclist simply put out too much heat and sweat in that temperature range for any fabric to disperse?
No.

Well, you've hit on the reason, too. Any rain jacket is a compromise in that regard, but they will keep you from getting really cold after you get wet.

At those temps, I'm probably wearing wool anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,910 Posts
There are a lot of variables (like how hard it is raining, how hard you are pedaling, how long you have been out and on and on and on) however wearing a well constructed cycling jacket with lots of vents and pit zipps PLUS having fenders on the bike there will be no reason to be uncomfortable in those conditions.

A helmet cover will help too.
 

·
Satanic Watch Winder
Joined
·
4,839 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
paulrad9 said:
At 55-65, you're on the border of not needing a jacket, so you may just want to get wet.

However, if you're on a longer ride and won't be hammering, then something like a Showerspass Elite may be right up your alley
Thanks. Here's an expanded scenario. I'm going to be riding some Ultra Marathon events this year. At 6'1" and 165 pounds, I'm not exactly what you would call insulated. Also, given water's ability to strip away body heat, getting wet a 55 degrees seems like hypothermia territory to me, especially for a long period of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,524 Posts
MB1 said:
There are a lot of variables (like how hard it is raining, how hard you are pedaling, how long you have been out and on and on and on) however wearing a well constructed cycling jacket with lots of vents and pit zipps PLUS having fenders on the bike there will be no reason to be uncomfortable in those conditions.
Agreed. The variables and clothing flexibility are very important. A jacket won't cook you at those temps in a hard rain if you're on an easy commute ride. In contrast, if you're riding at a hammering pace in a light drizzle you can get quite warm in a jacket. The benefit of a good jacket is having options. Open it up as you warm up to keep from breaking a hard sweat. Take it off if it stops raining. For road riding, rather than commute riding, wearing clothes that will keep you reasonably warm even if a bit wet can allow you to shed the jacket even if you'll get a little wet from the rain. For me, wool works much, much better for retaining all day warmth over a range of conditions, without baking me if things warm up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
I was going to comment, but it seems like pretty much everything has been mentioned.

The best (reputation-wise) breathable rain jacket that people talk about here is the Shower's Pass Elite 2.0 Rain Jacket. It's made for biking, out of eVent fabric, lots of vents and such. I'm sure there's other good rain jackets to, I just haven't heard about them as much - Endura also makes a bike rain jacket out of eVent fabric.

The other thing people do (as someone mentioned) is wear stuff like wool that keeps you warm even when it's wet. You might be able to combine the two and wear the jacket but open all the vents (even when it's raining) and let the fabric just deal with the small amount of water that gets inside.

One other thing that makes it hard to say for sure it that different people sweat different amounts, so if you sweat less a jacket might be better, if you sweat a great deal nothing but wool or some semi-waterproof material might be the best.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top