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Scary Teddy Bear
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's my list for greatest guitarist's, it's rather short....

Woman: 1. Bonnie Raitt-Arguably the best slide guitarist of either gender ever, Period.
2. Lita Ford- HUGE chops, girl could play.....

Blues: 1. BB King- simple, single note blues.....the MAN
2. SRV-Took it to the next level.....was able to do 2 1/2 step bends on 12's, I mean you're kidding right....
3. Buddy Guy-The perfect combination of technique and soul....Jimi credited him as being one of his biggest influences.

Rock:

Sixties: 1. Keith Richards- Simple, solid rock. The original....Plus he's like rasputin, he's been stabbed, hit by a car, struck by lightning TWICE...makes ozzy look like a born-again christian, and he's still alive....
2. Jimi Hendrix- took blues, added power and speed, and hard rock was born.
3. Tony Iommi- THE GODFATHER of metal.....the man....plus he has no fingertips on his fretting hand, amazing, solid technique. He and Ozzy said that when founding Sabbath, they looked around and everyone was singing about love and peace and flowers, and they thought what a load of cr*p. They saw poverty and war and famine.

Seventies: 1. Eddie Van Halen- Took Jimi, took it farther, I know of no one else with that combination of speed, talent, feeling, melody, etc. He used to joke about playing 10-12 hours straight EVERY day when he was younger.
2. Alex Lifeson- The Arpeggio god, I was really sad to see that he did not make Rolling Stone's list, so he's on here. Awesome player.
3. Jeff Beck-could have gone into either the sixties or early seventies, one of the best players ever, too bad he did not have great ambition or a strong work ethic.

Eighties: 1. Angus Young- Could have gone in the seventies, but really blossomed in the eighties, he was asked in 2000 when their album was coming out, how he would respond to critics saying that they remade the last album.....He started laughing very hard, and said, "We've made the same bloody album 13 times, and you americans keep buying it". Great guitarist, forced to play an SG because of his height.
2. George Lynch- UNBELIEVABLE talent, too bad was never in a band too match.
3. Zakk Wylde- the best of the best.

Nineties: 1. Tom Morello- did some amazing things, rock solid player.
2. Kim Thayil- same as Morello
3. Jerry Cantrell- Harmonies and dark melodies were unbelievable.
4. Dimebag Darrell- Speed, Technique......guy rocked...we opened for pantera in another band I was in in the early nineties before they were big....nicest guy in the world.

Post 2000:
1. Can't really think of anyone that has been inspirational to me lately, the only guy I have heard and sorta went cool, was the guy from Limp Bizkit, and I can't remember his name, so it must not have left that good of an impression.


That would be my list......just my 0.02 cents.
 

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Gronk SMASH!
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1,973 Posts
Here goes

SRV
Hendrix

Gawd, I can't do it. After that, it's varying types of appreciation that go up and down with time and mood. I can say that these two guys top my list, though.
I'm a rock guy at the end of the day.

My favorite solo on record is Skunk Baxter's solo in "Ricki Don't Lose That Number"
(I don't count instrumental tracks or extended jams. A solo is a piece of a song to me)


I think Guns 'N' Roses came as close to the perfect hard rock tone as any band in history. Their tone (and Slash's tone on his solos) is impeccable for hard rock.

Phys, kudos for mentioning Dimebag and Lynch. Dime's the shreddiest of the shred and clean as hel, and Lynch was the cream of the hair metal crop, by far.
He just put out a compendium of sorts that traces him back before his Dokken days to the late 70s. It's amazing how much some of his playing sounded like EVH at about the same time. I wonder if it was a regional thing, and EVH got the credit cause he broke out first?
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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14,791 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah..

jptaylorsg said:
SRV
Hendrix

Gawd, I can't do it. After that, it's varying types of appreciation that go up and down with time and mood. I can say that these two guys top my list, though.
I'm a rock guy at the end of the day.

My favorite solo on record is Skunk Baxter's solo in "Ricki Don't Lose That Number"
(I don't count instrumental tracks or extended jams. A solo is a piece of a song to me)


I think Guns 'N' Roses came as close to the perfect hard rock tone as any band in history. Their tone (and Slash's tone on his solos) is impeccable for hard rock.

Phys, kudos for mentioning Dimebag and Lynch. Dime's the shreddiest of the shred and clean as hel, and Lynch was the cream of the hair metal crop, by far.
He just put out a compendium of sorts that traces him back before his Dokken days to the late 70s. It's amazing how much some of his playing sounded like EVH at about the same time. I wonder if it was a regional thing, and EVH got the credit cause he broke out first?

It's too bad Dimebag got killed two years ago....I loved him.
 

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Back from the dead
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20,626 Posts
I don't know if I want to try coming up with a "best" list, but these are the guys I count as my strongest influences, sort of in order:

1. The Edge
2. Andy Summers
3. George Harrison
4. Eric Clapton
5. David Gilmour
6. Alex Lifeson
7. Neil Geraldo
8. Peter Buck
9. Neil Schon

I'm sure I'm forgetting a couple, but these are my guys. I'm not much of a shredder, I love soulful solos (there's a topic in itself), and I like guys who can provide a lot of texture to the band (note the number of trios).
 

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Not Banned
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49,013 Posts
well I always scored it like this

after seeing a guitarist perform live:

if I went home and went to bed: he sucked

if I went home and practiced for hours: was was good

if I went home and looked at my guitar and said "I'm sorry, I'm a fraud, I'm a charlatan I don't deserve you" : he was great

very few guys fit that last category for me. John McLaughlin and Jeff Beck come to mind. Now I can cop a load of Beck but his tone and feel, I'm a cheap mexican copy.
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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14,791 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thas'

mohair_chair said:
I don't know if I want to try coming up with a "best" list, but these are the guys I count as my strongest influences, sort of in order:

1. The Edge
2. Andy Summers
3. George Harrison
4. Eric Clapton
5. David Gilmour
6. Alex Lifeson
7. Neil Geraldo
8. Peter Buck
9. Neil Schon

I'm sure I'm forgetting a couple, but these are my guys. I'm not much of a shredder, I love soulful solos (there's a topic in itself), and I like guys who can provide a lot of texture to the band (note the number of trios).

a good list.....friggin hate neil schon though, met him once....biggest prima donna I ever met in music...he had a MIGHTY high opinion of himself. Exact opposite of Dimebag Darrell.
 

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agreed

I met Neil as well and I've never in my life wanted to punch out a man half my size so badly. My buddy builds Ross Valory's basses among other artists and my band played the S.D. Street Scene and Bad English was also on the bill.

Gilmour rules for me as far as 'soul guitarists'.No one bends a note like Dave.

ya missed a couple good ones from that era.

John Ashton - Psychedelic Furs
Johnny Marr - The Smiths
Daniel Ash - Bauhaus, Tones on Tale,Love and Rockets
John McKay and John McGeoch - Siouxsie and the Banshees
Will Sergeant - Echo and the Bunnymen
 

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Shirtcocker
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60,639 Posts
atpjunkie said:
I met Neil as well and I've never in my life wanted to punch out a man half my size so badly. My buddy builds Ross Valory's basses among other artists and my band played the S.D. Street Scene and Bad English was also on the bill.

Gilmour rules for me as far as 'soul guitarists'.No one bends a note like Dave.

ya missed a couple good ones from that era.

John Ashton - Psychedelic Furs
Johnny Marr - The Smiths
Daniel Ash - Bauhaus, Tones on Tale,Love and Rockets
John McKay and John McGeoch - Siouxsie and the Banshees
Will Sergeant - Echo and the Bunnymen
How bout Andy Gill from Gang of 4? Unique staccato style similar to Will Seargeant's--Where the F is Johnny Marr anyway these days? He made the Smiths.
 

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excellent call on Andy Gill

Bocephus Jones II said:
How bout Andy Gill from Gang of 4? Unique staccato style similar to Will Seargeant's--Where the F is Johnny Marr anyway these days? He made the Smiths.

yes Morrisey sux without the Smiths. But don't dis the drummer and bassist, monster rhythm section
 

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physasst said:
Here's my list for greatest guitarist's, it's rather short....

Woman: 1. Bonnie Raitt-Arguably the best slide guitarist of either gender ever, Period.
2. Lita Ford- HUGE chops, girl could play.....

Blues: 1. BB King- simple, single note blues.....the MAN
2. SRV-Took it to the next level.....was able to do 2 1/2 step bends on 12's, I mean you're kidding right....
3. Buddy Guy-The perfect combination of technique and soul....Jimi credited him as being one of his biggest influences.

Rock:

Sixties: 1. Keith Richards- Simple, solid rock. The original....Plus he's like rasputin, he's been stabbed, hit by a car, struck by lightning TWICE...makes ozzy look like a born-again christian, and he's still alive....
2. Jimi Hendrix- took blues, added power and speed, and hard rock was born.
3. Tony Iommi- THE GODFATHER of metal.....the man....plus he has no fingertips on his fretting hand, amazing, solid technique. He and Ozzy said that when founding Sabbath, they looked around and everyone was singing about love and peace and flowers, and they thought what a load of cr*p. They saw poverty and war and famine.

Seventies: 1. Eddie Van Halen- Took Jimi, took it farther, I know of no one else with that combination of speed, talent, feeling, melody, etc. He used to joke about playing 10-12 hours straight EVERY day when he was younger.
2. Alex Lifeson- The Arpeggio god, I was really sad to see that he did not make Rolling Stone's list, so he's on here. Awesome player.
3. Jeff Beck-could have gone into either the sixties or early seventies, one of the best players ever, too bad he did not have great ambition or a strong work ethic.

Eighties: 1. Angus Young- Could have gone in the seventies, but really blossomed in the eighties, he was asked in 2000 when their album was coming out, how he would respond to critics saying that they remade the last album.....He started laughing very hard, and said, "We've made the same bloody album 13 times, and you americans keep buying it". Great guitarist, forced to play an SG because of his height.
2. George Lynch- UNBELIEVABLE talent, too bad was never in a band too match.
3. Zakk Wylde- the best of the best.

Nineties: 1. Tom Morello- did some amazing things, rock solid player.
2. Kim Thayil- same as Morello
3. Jerry Cantrell- Harmonies and dark melodies were unbelievable.
4. Dimebag Darrell- Speed, Technique......guy rocked...we opened for pantera in another band I was in in the early nineties before they were big....nicest guy in the world.

Post 2000:
1. Can't really think of anyone that has been inspirational to me lately, the only guy I have heard and sorta went cool, was the guy from Limp Bizkit, and I can't remember his name, so it must not have left that good of an impression.


That would be my list......just my 0.02 cents.

Good choices....

Bonnie Raitt... oh what a jem she is! Nobody can feel the steel with a bottleneck like she can.

Dwain Allman... the true master of the slide. Listen to "The Alman Brother Band at Filmore East" And, his piece on a National steel body guitar, "Little Martha", was a classic. Open G tuning.

BB... the best of the blues, ever! Except for when teamed up with Bobby Bland. Then you have the best of the best.

Keith Richards... Oh what a sound. But ain't no BB or Dwain! Rock'n'roll at it's finest.

Hendrix to Van Halen... not a contest. Too different. Van Halen discovered the relationship between a keyboard and the neck of a guitar. Hendrix was too far gone when he started cause of the juice but he will never be compromised. Hendrix is Hendrix. Van Halen is Van Halen!

What about... Eric Clapton? Prolific, intense, and a true master of the slide.

Muddy Waters? Want to feel the roots of the bules and a slide? Went to an Allman Bros concert in the early 70's and he was the lead out. As far as I am concerned, he blew the Alman Bros away before they got started.

For a pinch, check out, Leo Kotke and Pete Seeger for a 12 string slide guitar that can't be anything but but from a master...

IMHO... ain't nothin better!
 

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Non non normal
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Ten off the top of my head

Stevie Ray Vaughan
Duane Allman
Carlos Santana
Chet Atkins
Phil Keaggy
Steve Morse
BBKing
Jimi
Mark Knopfler
Slowhand
 

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Poseur
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Bigrider

I'm curious as to how you know about Phil Keagy. I brought his name up on the RS100 thread. I saw him many, many times in Cleveland back in the Glass Harp days. I only met him once, but he was truly a nice guy, and it's too bad they didn't stay together. I was at one show of theirs, with the James Gang(with Walsh) also playing, and it was so unbelievable how much more talent they had. Phil played a Les Paul with two fender super reverbs when I saw them, and his only "effect" was reverb, but he cetainly got some great sounds from that setup.
 

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Non non normal
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TUT2222 said:
I'm curious as to how you know about Phil Keagy. I brought his name up on the RS100 thread. I saw him many, many times in Cleveland back in the Glass Harp days. I only met him once, but he was truly a nice guy, and it's too bad they didn't stay together. I was at one show of theirs, with the James Gang(with Walsh) also playing, and it was so unbelievable how much more talent they had. Phil played a Les Paul with two fender super reverbs when I saw them, and his only "effect" was reverb, but he cetainly got some great sounds from that setup.

I used to listen to him years ago. There was a rumor which I think was false but it went like this.

Jimi Hendrix was asked what it was like being the greatest guitarist on earth and he said " You would have to ask Phil Keagy"

I had a friend drag me down to a small bar in Boston around 1979 to hear the Dixie Dregs. Wow. Morris was unbelievable. They played two shows and you had to buy a ticket to get in.

For the record, I don't know much about guitars and never played but I do know what I like to hear and think I have a pretty good ear. I prefer precision and creative melodic improvision over speed and flash.
 
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