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gastarbeiter
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Janez Brajkovic has aways looked scrawny in pics, but his arms look scary thin in this pic. Landis is a Praying Mantis, so i suppose Brajkovic is a Stick Insect? :)



 

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botto said:
Janez Brajkovic has aways looked scrawny in pics, but his arms look scary thin in this pic. Landis is a Praying Mantis, so i suppose Brajkovic is a Stick Insect? :)



It's the name of the game. You want to be world class, lose everything that doesn't make you faster. When pros retire they turn normal sized again. At least they aren't like American football players who are on the cusp of being fat when they play and then turn into huge blobs with back problems when they retire. Did you know that a recent study showed that the common theme amoungst people that live longer and healthier than normal lifes is that they were below the average weight (skinny) for their size the majority of their lives, food for thought.
 

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OnTheRivet said:
botto said:
Did you know that a recent study showed that the common theme amoungst people that live longer and healthier than normal lifes is that they were below the average weight (skinny) for their size the majority of their lives, food for thought.
There's healthy skinny and then there's unhealthy skinny...I'm guessing these guys are really doing a number of their metabolism by getting so thin.
 

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Bocephus Jones II said:
OnTheRivet said:
There's healthy skinny and then there's unhealthy skinny...I'm guessing these guys are really doing a number of their metabolism by getting so thin.
Why. Studies have shown that calorie restriction with adequate nutrition poses no long term problems. I know cyclists are getting adequate nutrition, otherwise they wouldn't be world class athletes.
 

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yup

running on 'just the right amount' of nutriton,not a calorie more. Props to them and it's why I think they deserve to get fat when they retire
 

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Saul Raisin was anorexic

OnTheRivet said:
Bocephus Jones II said:
Why. Studies have shown that calorie restriction with adequate nutrition poses no long term problems. I know cyclists are getting adequate nutrition, otherwise they wouldn't be world class athletes.


He was down to 1000 calories a day and suffering before he changed his ways.

This months Pro Cycling.
 

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OnTheRivet said:
Bocephus Jones II said:
Why. Studies have shown that calorie restriction with adequate nutrition poses no long term problems. I know cyclists are getting adequate nutrition, otherwise they wouldn't be world class athletes.
Not only has the research shown no long term problems it has shown highly significant increases in longevity (up to 30% in rats and mice). Because of the long life span human studies are not forthcoming but it has held true in every species tested. They are getting closer to isolating the molecular compounds responsible for the increase and, not at all surprisingly, turning them into a new drug. Remains to be seen whether it could overcome the effects of those who are actively cutting their lives short through their lifestyle choices.
 

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Something that is often overlooked on this topic is what I believe is malnutrition as much as obesity. Malnutrition is probably a real reason for the extremes in weight we see today. The world does not consume nearly enough fresh veggies, due to availability, cost, or pure ignorance.
 

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terzo rene said:
OnTheRivet said:
Not only has the research shown no long term problems it has shown highly significant increases in longevity (up to 30% in rats and mice). Because of the long life span human studies are not forthcoming but it has held true in every species tested. They are getting closer to isolating the molecular compounds responsible for the increase and, not at all surprisingly, turning them into a new drug. Remains to be seen whether it could overcome the effects of those who are actively cutting their lives short through their lifestyle choices.
What's the cutoff weight percentage though? There has to be a point where losing more weight becomes unhealthy. Just because it allows them to climb faster doesn't make it best for optimal health. If athletic performance was all that counted then you'd have to say EPO and steroids were good for you as well. Cyclists in general and definately pro cyclists also have problems with bone density issues since cycling is relatively non-weight bearing activity.
 

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gastarbeiter
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OnTheRivet said:
At least they aren't like American football players who are on the cusp of being fat when they play and then turn into huge blobs with back problems when they retire.
and basing this sweeping statetment on what? obviously not facts. i think you'e confusing american footballers with soccer/football players, ala maradonna, gazza, and like ol' chav king wayne rooney will be in 10--15 years :rolleyes:

one of my brother in-laws best friends from home played for the NY Giants and the Atlanta Falcons. he LOST over 100 lbs when he retired. he's not unique.

btw - i could care less about american football :D
 

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Every pro's arms look scary skinny when they're in a compression skinsuit and you're looking at them head on, elbows bent in.

Ya just don't need big biceps to bike!

Them stick bugs don't have quads like that, I'll say.
 

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botto said:
and basing this sweeping statetment on what? obviously not facts. i think you'e confusing american footballers with soccer/football players, ala maradonna, gazza, and like ol' chav king wayne rooney will be in 10--15 years :rolleyes:

one of my brother in-laws best friends from home played for the NY Giants and the Atlanta Falcons. he LOST over 100 lbs when he retired. he's not unique.

btw - i could care less about american football :D
Based on their weight, their gargantuan azzes, their huge guts, how they need a complete trama ward on the sidelines during training camp in anticipation of "them keeling over. The example you gave may not be unique, but it's very rare.
350-400 lbs weight while they are in their physical prime, and as physically active as they'll ever be, does not bode well for the days when they retire.
Here's a story
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2313476
"Heavy NFL players twice as likely to die before 50"
and another
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9054682/
and another
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/13491134.htm
The unhealthy state of current and retired NFL players can be based on doctor's statements.
''All my players are coming back to me in their 40s and 50s for ankle, knee and hip replacements, and with spinal problems and arthritis,'' said Dr. Pierce Scranton, who was team physician for the Seattle Seahawks for 17 years. ``They were fed like Kobe beef cows to get huge and now they are paying one hell of a price.''

Sleep apnea, a brief cessation of breathing, afflicts 34 percent of NFL linemen compared to four percent of the general population, according to a 2003 study printed in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The NFL's largest players are 50 percent more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease than the average person, Dr. Sherry Baron found in a National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health study. The risk to linemen was six times higher than that to smaller NFL players.
 

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Bocephus Jones II said:
terzo rene said:
What's the cutoff weight percentage though? There has to be a point where losing more weight becomes unhealthy. Just because it allows them to climb faster doesn't make it best for optimal health. If athletic performance was all that counted then you'd have to say EPO and steroids were good for you as well. Cyclists in general and definately pro cyclists also have problems with bone density issues since cycling is relatively non-weight bearing activity.
The short term research with humans has been around 900kcal per day for sedentary/low activity males so obviously a pro cyclist eating 1000 a day is a radically different proposition. High volumes of exercise (significantly in excess of 5000kcal burned per week) are generally thought to be a negative for life expectancy though the mechanisms remain unclear.

Really nothing any pro athletes do is optimal for overall health. Simply trying to achieve peak form is a divergence from optimum. The primary reason you can't hold peak fitness is the body is constantly trying to reestablish homeostasis, which a peak by definition isn't.
 

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terzo rene said:
High volumes of exercise (significantly in excess of 5000kcal burned per week) are generally thought to be a negative for life expectancy though the mechanisms remain unclear.
If this is true then I'm screwed. I've been doing that sort of volume and more for a long, long time.
 

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Under ACrookedSky said:
If this is true then I'm screwed. I've been doing that sort of volume and more for a long, long time.
Me too. Unfortunately nobody has ever come up with a specific level that becomes deleterious, probably because there are so many variables both individual and environmental to contend with. If you are riding double centuries in LA during a smog alert it isn't going to take much to overwhelm the benefits of exercise and shorten your lifespan.

I think one methodological problem is that much of the research on extremes of exercise volume and environment have been conducted on soldiers and my opinion is that a not insignificant determinant of whether stress like exercise is detrimental is the psychological state produced during the stress. Presumably for the soldiers in the studies it was a decidedly negative experience in many cases, and I suspect the endocrine and other responses produced in that state differ from those of blasting up a tough climb for the thrill of it. The pathways by which mental states influence immune function have been fairly well mapped recently so it's not that much of a stretch to assume state of mind during the exercise would alter the physiologic responses.

None of it is likely to get settled for years and really the biggest threat to lifespan in most cases is the fact that we are out playing in traffic so that's what should really be the focus of attention.
 
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