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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to purchase a custom set of wheels and need some advice. I am 6ft, 220lbs, and ride mostly on smooth roads with the occasional bumpy sections on bridge underpasses. My primary concern is toughness with weight as a secondary concern. Here is what I am looking at right now:

-Rim: DT Swiss 585.
-Hubs: Ultegra 6600 (28H) front and 6600 (32H) rear.
-Brass nipples.
-DT Champion 2.0mm spokes.
-Price $390


Any advice is appreciated. :)
 

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A wheelist
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11,322 Posts
es2 said:
I am looking to purchase a custom set of wheels and need some advice. I am 6ft, 220lbs, and ride mostly on smooth roads with the occasional bumpy sections on bridge underpasses. My primary concern is toughness with weight as a secondary concern. Here is what I am looking at right now:
-Rim: DT Swiss 585.
-Hubs: Ultegra 6600 (28H) front and 6600 (32H) rear.
-Brass nipples.
-DT Champion 2.0mm spokes.
-Price $390
Any advice is appreciated. :)
Why the straight gauge spokes? Here ya go, option them out with the 585 black rims, Comp double butted spokes and save $0.05 from your $390 -

http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com/index.php?_a=viewProd&productId=113

If I was your weight and not concerned with wheel weight I'd add the weight of 4 more spokes for the front wheel and go with the 32h.
 

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I don't really see how those wheels can hold 300lbs, but I never saw them up close before. They also appear to be built overseas.

I would not recommend 27mm rims with 20/24 spokes for a 300lb rider even if the spokes are beefy. Do you know how they determined the maximum weight limit?
 

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Engineer
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Yes, they are built overseas using the same factory as Mavic. Almost all wheels are built overseas and the ones that are not still use parts made overseas. If you were familiar with the requirements needed to claim country of origin, you would never spend top dollar for made in Italy, France, Germany, etc again. To be brief, paint or a sticker will do for country of origin claims. As far as weight limits, they are estimations based on material properties of the wheels. Spokes are normally the limiting factor followed by the eyelet areas of the rims and the flanges of the hubs. Super high spoke counts are great if you have a minimalist approach on the rims. More spokes mean you can have a lighter rim. Less spokes mean you need a stronger rim. These are 27mm rims which add a lot of strength over 20mm rims. Lastly build quality effects wheel strength. Proper spoke tension being key.
 

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If a given rim is strong enough with 32 spokes in the rear, then it's more than strong enough with 28 spokes in the front. The front wheel supports only about 40% of the weight, has no dish, and no drive torque.
 

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Diesel Engine
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Agreed, I wouldn't sweat the 4 spokes either way in the front wheel, there's no significant weight or strength penalty either way. If it were me and the cost of rims/hubs (e.g you can catch a sale on something in a certain drilling) is less for one of the options I would go that way for the front wheel.

Edit - also go with butted spokes as almost everyone else is suggesting. Some will build the drive side with straight gauge for a bit of insurance, but at your weight you should be fine with butted spokes all around.
 
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