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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I`ve been kind of half looking for a somewhat "roadier" bike than my current available road ride (rigid mtb with skinny tires) for use mostly on pavement but a good bit of light offroad in the mix. Crossbike was what first came to mind, but I see an almost local listing for an RB-T that looks like a dandy price and I must admit I`m more drawn to classic Japanese steel than most modern offerings. The catch is that it`s about an hour`s drive from here and the seller doesn`t really know much about it, so wasn`t very helpful in determining if it`s be a good bike for me. Was that a ful scale heavy touring bike, or more of a sport tourer? Shouldn`t be any problem fitting 32mm tires? Also, this one is listed as "Synergy RB-T". "Synergy" doesn`t mean anything, does it? This one is apparently a 91 (just going by the color and some vague info that I was able to get out of the seller and from Google) and has a 3X7 drivetrain (barends) with 700 wheels canti brakes. From the picture, it looks to be about the right size. Aside from that, I can`t tell much. Whaddaya think- a good candidate for me or probably not much more suitable than what I already have? Keep looking for a CC bike? Worth driving out to take a look?
 

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Never heard anyone complain about an RB-T. Check out the iBob list for raves. I say get it.
 

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la dolce vita
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I had one. Nice, but by today's standards, very dated. Its an ancient version of a Surly Long Haul Trucker. Heavy, loaded touring bike and will probably have components that you'll want to swap out anyway. Unless you are getting it for less than $200, I would invest my money in a later model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thanks, guys. Actually I wasn`t wondering so much how good the quality was as whether or not it would be a good match for me. I went this morning to look at it and bought it- I think we`re going to be good buddies. I was surprised to find the components not as "nice" as I was expecting (`specially the wheels), but they`re plenty serviceable. I gave it a much needed bath this afternoon and will probably service all the bearings in the next couple weeks, maybe a new set of tires and use it this summer. Next winter, if I get bored I`ll strip it to the frame and give it a thourough going over. Or not. Mootsie is right about it being heavier than a new bike from the $1000 point and up, but it isn`t really that much of a tank. The catalogue scans I found through Sheldon Brown list it as 25# and some change- that seems about right to me. My commuter is over 40# and my 26" touring bike is almost 32 # with rack, fenders and tool/tube bag, so that 25 isn`t as heavy by my standards as it would be for a lot of other folks. As to tires, 32 won`t be a problem. It came with 32s from the factory and the 28s it has now leave tons of room for more. Now that I think about it, I wonder if the scanned literature was wrong and maybe Mr P specced it with the tires it`s wearing right now. Hmmmm... You be the judge :D

Oh yeah- I paid $250 for it. Not too awfull bad, though more than the above recomended max. I`m a lousy bargainer but I have no doubt I`ll get my money`s worth out of the bike.
 

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la dolce vita
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Mine came stock with a rear rack, frame pump and had silver decals otherwise they look the same. The frame is the best part of the bike so if you upgrade the components over time you should have a fun ride. New wheels will make a big difference.
 

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I'm with RC, I think that's a good find. How well does it fit you? As Mootsie said that would be a great frame to take care of and rebuild with modern parts and new wheels. It's steel so a good shop will be able to spread the drop-outs for 130 or 135 (if you prefer) and re-align the frame after spreading. Just be sure to find the shop that can do it first, then take the frame in. Don't go for any "well I think we can do that" comments, just go to the next shop.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was just thinking- now that I have this bike and no longer have need to convert my touring bike back and forth from heavy to "light" I may as well retire my commuter (the third retirement for that frame) and I`ll still have the same number of bikes to store and maintain. I can move the dyno wheel and lights over to my touring bike, put the Nexus wheel and shifter on my wife`s bike (she`ll love it), find a home for the racks and baskets and put the Deore cranks on my mtb (they`re lighter than the stock ones I`ve been using for seven years).

Yeah, the wheels could definitely use upgrading but if I do that it won`t be this year. Besides the wheels, it would mean a cassette and shifters (these seem to be indexed only) and if I go that far I may as well get a RD that would index with the other stuff. The other option that crossed my mind would be to relace the hubs with Open Sports or CR 18s, but after adding in the cost of spokes and nipples that hardly seems worth while. Better to just leave the checkbook to rest for a while.
 
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