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I am getting into racing and would like a book to more or less help me train to be better in addition to what the team does, I am a noob so I feel like I have to play "catch up" if I want to be involved in racing next season(collegiate cycling), or in just in general. I guess there would be no harm in trying some crits over the summer. From reading another post someone was talking about Edward Borysewicz (I think?) and I found Bicycle Road Racing: The Complete Program for Training and Competition I am open to any suggestions.
 

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Thanks for the info. I just ordered it. I have been training too hard and my level of committment is growing to the point that it is ridiculous for me to not know what I'm
doing. I think this forum is more in line with where I want to end up concentrating, not
so much obssessing over bikes (steel vs cf), components or etiquette or worse yet,
how many grams everything weighs. Frankly, I don't understand why this (and coaching)
are not the primary posting forums. Shouldn't the ultimate objective of cycling be improving
your physical performance? I am guessing most of the sophisticated cyclists on this site
have already read a dozen books and have moved past this educational stage.
 

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"I guess there would be no harm in trying some crits over the summer."

Ride more and read less. Learn by racing. Learn by crashing. Learn by going off the back after the first 5 minutes. Learn by finishing with the field. Learn by sprinting to a top five finish.
 

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Build your library

slowtrevor said:
I am getting into racing and would like a book to more or less help me train to be better in addition to what the team does, I am a noob so I feel like I have to play "catch up" if I want to be involved in racing next season(collegiate cycling), or in just in general. I guess there would be no harm in trying some crits over the summer. From reading another post someone was talking about Edward Borysewicz (I think?) and I found Bicycle Road Racing: The Complete Program for Training and Competition I am open to any suggestions.
Go over to RoadBikeRider.com and look at their book selection. They have a wide choice of books on all kinds of topics, and a lot of them are cheap downloads.
 

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MR_GRUMPY said:
"I guess there would be no harm in trying some crits over the summer."

Ride more and read less. Learn by racing. Learn by crashing. Learn by going off the back after the first 5 minutes. Learn by finishing with the field. Learn by sprinting to a top five finish.
Not bad advice, but why can't he do both? Reading doesn't hurt your cycling.
 

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Thanks, I went over to B&N and they didn't have the "Bible" in stock, and also was $20+ for it, I will just get it from Amazon for a dollar and change plus shipping, since I would have to wait 3 weeks anyway. I checked out the other RBR and it looks like a good source as well, I may look into that site before ordering the book.
 

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slowtrevor said:
Thanks, I went over to B&N and they didn't have the "Bible" in stock, and also was $20+ for it, I will just get it from Amazon for a dollar and change plus shipping, since I would have to wait 3 weeks anyway. I checked out the other RBR and it looks like a good source as well, I may look into that site before ordering the book.

road racing tactics for cycling

by thomas prehn

http://www.amazon.com/Racing-Tactics-Cyclists-Thomas-Prehn/dp/1931382301
 

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I've heard good things (been meaning to order it) about "Bike Racing 101" - may be a little broader than Friel (which I own, and agree is a good resource, but likely less applicable to newcomers [including myself]).
 

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I have Bike Racing 101. Good book with all the basics and the advice you hear frequently, like stay in the front third of the pack.

And Grumpy, while yes, good to get out and just race in some training crits, it is also good to read up on what one should be doing between races, e.g., have a couple of tough training days per week and for the rest, just do endurance rides. That is something you will not learn by racing and in my experience, most people just getting in to racing, have no idea how to train, usually going far to hard and not allowing for recovery.
 

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Race as much as possible

Read yes. There are several very good training books (ie. Friel- however it is tough to trust a guy who advicates positioning the pedal in the center of the shoe). However, racing is far more than being the fittest guy out there. Most books fall well short of the tactics involved in racing. If you read magazine articles (print them out) or if you buy a tactics book make sure to re-read these as you gain experience. Things that did not seem relevant in the beginning will be keys later on. In addition, you will need to race for a long time to understand what is happening. Therefore, yes get into the crits even with minimal fitness. The cat 5 crits are short and not that physically demanding in general (compared to longer crits of 60-90 minutes). Any college age persons should be able to gain the fitness in about three weeks. In addition, the pack likely stays together and the winners have better sprints.
 

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Actually, there is a growing movement to move cleats to the mid-sole position. It eliminates a lot of problems in the foot/ankle with power transfer. Look at anyone who rides a bike (not as much as we do) and the natural position is to put the arch of the foot on the pedal. It's more natural and comfortable.

Prelim results show improved power and less leg fatigue. It shows a higher top-end (easier to spin), but less "jump" in a sprint.
 

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iliveonnitro said:
Actually, there is a growing movement to move cleats to the mid-sole position. It eliminates a lot of problems in the foot/ankle with power transfer. Look at anyone who rides a bike (not as much as we do) and the natural position is to put the arch of the foot on the pedal. It's more natural and comfortable.

Prelim results show improved power and less leg fatigue. It shows a higher top-end (easier to spin), but less "jump" in a sprint.
Where are these results posted?
 

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RHRoop said:
Where are these results posted?
I've been half-watching this topic on Joe Friel's blog. I think the research is still ambiguous.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16901493
Suggests cleat placement (standard, midfoot, or heel) does not influence cycling economy. The study subjects were competitive cyclists who were presumably used to the standard cleat position, so I find this "non-finding" interesting.

http://www.asbweb.org/conferences/2006/pdfs/286.pdf
I think this study was a little half-baked, but showed peak power output the same and pedaling "efficiency" to be smoother with heel placement.

Triathletes are especially interested in mid-foot placement because it theoretically saves their calves for the run, and they don't really have to worry about toestrike, climbing out of the saddle, etc.
 

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Get as many books a s you care to read

I have Burke, Morris, Freil, Baker , Hunter and a few other that I don't recall at the moment.
Information is power, if you read enough books you will find information that contradicts what you just read in another book.:eek: But never the less you will be informed or(mis-informed)

I had to post something, so the forum would stop asking me to comeback:rolleyes:
 
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