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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm aware of the various tests which indicate that the best clinchers with latex tubes have lower rolling resistance than the best tubulars. However, the applicability of these tests to real road conditions has been called into question, and I recall reading on the Zipp website that when RR tests are performed with an apparatus which more closely simulates the texture of pavement, tubies actually fare better.

Does anybody have any well-controlled power meter data on REAL ROADS (or access to the aforementioned tests) to settle the question? If clinchers really do have lower RR, how much of the benefit is lost with butyl tubes? And what is the magnitude of the difference in terms of power? For example, will the (admittedly small) benefits of dropping 500g with tubular wheels on an 8% grade be negated by the increase in rolling resistance?

Sorry if this has been beat to death before, but I just can't seem to find any sort of definitive answer.
 

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500g is more than you would really drop with *most* tubulars. If you want a wheelset optimized for 8% grades, look at Al's data on BikeTechReview, and my spreadsheet here:
http://www.whitemountainwheels.com/SpeedPower.html

... or some other power calculator.

Zipp might be correct about the glue on tubies giving a vibration damping effect that offers a benefit on real roads... that doesn't show up on roller tests. If you are really serious on a steep climbing race, the lightest tubie wheels and the lightest bike with VF Record tires (with track glue) will not give you much room for equipment excuses. If you aren't a top pro though, I think it might be better to focus on other areas... it isn't going to be a lot of difference in any case.

Also... use latex tubes if you want the lowest Crr... this is cheap, easy, and real.
 

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Hey, my tires are second on the list! Wonder how the new Ultremos, ProRace3's
and 4000s fare as far as CRR goes. Aren't latex tubes a little more susceptible
to flatting? I know this matter is largely academic, since the casing would stave off
most flats. If you can read the White Mountain spreadsheet, you're a better man than
I, Gunga Din.
 

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phoehn9111 said:
Hey, my tires are second on the list! Wonder how the new Ultremos, ProRace3's
and 4000s fare as far as CRR goes. Aren't latex tubes a little more susceptible
to flatting? I know this matter is largely academic, since the casing would stave off
most flats. If you can read the White Mountain spreadsheet, you're a better man than
I, Gunga Din.
The Pr3's were really good. Ultremo's not so much. 4000s is the best conty by a mile.

Latex don't flat more given a good rim strip.

I have seen any well thought out objections to the BTR roller tests (which match up very well with several other tests including Tour ect.)

Usually it some fan boy (or sales rep) who found out his favorite brand (often Tufos) rolls worse then a garden hose. And profers some lame theory as to why in the "real world" his sucky tires don't suck. They do.
 

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phoehn9111 said:
If you can read the White Mountain spreadsheet, you're a better man than
I, Gunga Din.
I made it... so I can probably read it... maybe.

Latex tubes are less likely to flat from pinches or punctures... however, they will tend to pop through a hole pretty easily.

Look at the Crr data on Bike Tech Review... it is the most extensive and up to date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info and links. I was considering building up a lightweight carbon tubular wheelset, but considering that I probably wouldn't be using track glue, nor the relatively fragile tires with the lowest Crr, it sounds as if I'd be just as well off with a light set of clinchers with PR3s and latex tubes.
 

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considerations

supercrank said:
Thanks for the info and links. I was considering building up a lightweight carbon tubular wheelset, but considering that I probably wouldn't be using track glue, nor the relatively fragile tires with the lowest Crr, it sounds as if I'd be just as well off with a light set of clinchers with PR3s and latex tubes.
I have had 5 sets of carbon tubular wheels, Zipp, Lew, and Campy. Yes, they are light. Braking absolutely sucks, though. Braking can be darn right scary sometimes.

For my time trial bike this time, I chose Zipp 999 clinchers. About a pound heavier, but it's a time trial bike, after all. I run Michelin latex tubes and Zipp clinchers. Great tires. Latex tubes are nice, but their quality control seems to be a little spotty. They have a tendency to come loose at the valve stem. After a while, they sort of dry out, too, and don't last nearly as long as butyl tubes.
 
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