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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well all I'm asking for is what brand of Road Bike should I get?
I am a newbie to Road Cycling so help me out!
There the specifications on like 20-speed or 12-speed whatever that is, which I need info on what the heck that is too. =D

How can I choose the right Road Bike? Also, what bikes are you guys personally using? I'm looking for a Good/Pro bike that's affordable. 1,000 Range.
 

· (not a real racer)
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That's a hard question. Sounds like you need a trip to the local bike shop. I wouldn't be too set on brands though. Go with what fits you, what feels good and is in your price range. The folks at the LBS will help you with all that, that is if they are a reputable shop. I was dead set on getting a Specialized but I walked out with a Cannondale because it fit me way better. A lot of it "just depends"
 

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It's actually called "due diligence"

BoootyHoIe said:
Ah I see. I guess I can't find anything for myself. All I have to do is go to a Local Bike Shop and have them do the work.
I will say this, you will be getting a much bigger bang for your dollar than someone buying a $1000 bike a few years ago.

It is not a simple process. You really do need to educate yourself before buying so you know what you are actually buying and where corners are cut on full bike purchases. Saddles/ seatposts/ bars and stems and wheelsets are where corners will be cut. Don't misunderstand me, when i say corners cut I mean the parts are perfectly usable and safe to use, but what good is the saddle or bars to you if you don't like their fit or feel? So the MFGer of the bike realizes this and put's a generic part on there that he bought in bulk at a discounted price and keeps his profits up.

Frames, some are better than others the one that fits you is the best. You can find your frame size approximately by using Wrenchscience.com or Colorado Cyclist sites and take some measurements of yourself.

If this makes you feel any better, I have been riding since the 70's and I'm still not 100% certain what is the perfect bike for me.
 

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Check out anything from Fuji, Specialized allez or roubaix, cannondale caad, or scott speedster series. these all offer good stuff for about a grand. One thing to look for is something with a 105 group for components, thatll make sure that youre set for quite a while. otherwise its whatever frame fits you the best thatll be the right choice. some things I can say about those bikes is that fuji will give you a ton of components for the price, cannondale caads are very fast and nimble but may be a little harsh for someone thats new to riding, the roubaix is qutie the comfy bike but still very sporty as is the allez. the scotts are a great blend of a cannondale and a specialized.
 

· Musculo Med Doc
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In every single bike line - there is a single bike/component in which there isn't a huge difference up to the next level, for the avg. cycling enthusiast. It is likely to be the bike that money not an option - gives you the best bang for the ol' buck. You can easily get carried away - and start spending exorbitant amounts very quickly.

From my years of being into the sport - and when I look back at them & my purchases this is what I think:

1) Plan on at least $1000 for your first bike. That gets you in the door of really nice ride, that you can upgrade componentry as you go. You'll at least be on a respectable frame. With that said, you sure as hell ain't look at Carbon for that price, and if you do see one - look the other way! You'd likely be better off spending the extra few bucks in better metals than you would in cheap carbon (at least IMHO).

2) If you have the pocket to find "that one bike" in the line, as I described above - go for it.

3) Spend the extra funds on a great pair of shorts (likely to cost you around $100..... and to that I'd go straight to bibs.... never met anyone that once turned on to them - ever went to anything else)

Also of note on the don't short change list, great shoes!!!! Particularly, with the current use of carbon in the soles. You drop extra here, and you'll bring your shoes to the next bike you buy in the years to come. Albeit, that I'm picking up new shoes in the next few weeks.... I've been in the original pair of Sidi dominators for the past 14 years! Ridin' on both Road & Mtn. Muchos Abuse to em'..... and if they had carbon soles back then - they'd probably still be kickin' just as much as in their hay-day!

4) What ever it is that you buy - get it from the most reputable bike fitter in your area. Don't just go into the biggest shop, literally find the best fitter. Standing over a bike and pulling it up to your nutz - Not exactly what we call great bike fitter. You should find a shop that is willing to swap out different lengths for components and such. Getting your first bike, and one that fits your body - will have a huge payoff down the road! No matter how much I "thought" I wanted some specific bike, if I couldn't get it from a great bike fitter, I wouldn't get it at all. Especially when just getting in to the sport. Over the years as you learn what sizes, lengths, angles, positions and such - yeah maybe that won't apply... as much.... but for now - find a Great fitter!

Well,

All just my $.02.........


whatever you get.......

Keep the rubber side down & enjoy the ride!


p.s. - oh yeah - go straight to clipless pedals! It only takes your first fall in front of a crowd to learn how to ride em' (or should I say, un-clip from them) Once that happens - it'll never happen again!
 

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buy a lower end cyclocross bike (they really don'e make low end ones so it's still gona be expensive)

you can put some road wheels on it and some nobbies to play with some CX racing come fall.

CX is great for young racers. You learn great bike handeling skills for the road and then some.

for frame types... think Fugi, bianchi axis, redline...
 

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I would go to the library and bet the Bicycle Magazine's buyer's guide issue and read that, heck read a whole years worth while you are at it. Find your best local bike shop and go in and start to ask questions. Buy what every kind of bike your best bike shop sells.

The list of suggestions a couple up seem right on. You need a bunch of other stuff beyond the bike, but you can pick them up as you go. For example, shorts, shoes, pedals, pump, patch kit, seat bag, etc.

Cyclocross bike? Humm, new wheels? Changing tires? Would have to pass on that suggestion.

Sounds like a fun adventure, good luck.
 

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Midwestern Biker Dude said:
Cyclocross bike? Humm, new wheels? Changing tires? Would have to pass on that suggestion.

oops, he won't need new wheels, but swapping out the tires is something he'd better learn to do before he gets stuck on the road.

most juniors here in CO race on CX bikes on the road as they use the same bike in the fall. It's a great way to get more bang for your buck. I'd recommend asking the shop you buy it from to show you how to change out the tires to road tires (that you also bought from them) It's a great way to learn to change a flat in stead of trying to figure it out on the side of the road when rain clouds are coming in.
 

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BoootyHoIe said:
Well all I'm asking for is what brand of Road Bike should I get?
I am a newbie to Road Cycling so help me out!
There the specifications on like 20-speed or 12-speed whatever that is, which I need info on what the heck that is too. =D

How can I choose the right Road Bike? Also, what bikes are you guys personally using? I'm looking for a Good/Pro bike that's affordable. 1,000 Range.
There is no "best", there is no "right", there is only what you end up choosing and later deciding if you still like your choice. What is best and right today might not be best and right once you get a few miles on your legs and cycling.

You have set a budget, that is good, but does that budget factor in accessories like shoes and helmet and gloves and a multi tool and a seat bag to carry stuff in? Will you want to ride in street clothes or will you want to get all lycra'd out? Are you looking at using the bike for road racing, and if so will it be criteriums or road races or time trials? Are you going to be using the bike for commuting, or general exercise and just riding around for fun and for something to do?

The better you form parameters of what you're looking for the better your final decision will be. And if you don't have any or many answers yet then just provide what you do know so far.

With all that said I will submit one question to you:
1. Do you prefer or want or desire:
1.a. Steel frame and forks
1.b. Aluminum frame and forks
1.c. carbon fiber frame and forks
1.d. a combination (such as a steel frame and a c/f fork)
1.e. other
1.f. No preference or don't know yet or haven't formed an opinion yet.

I will also submit one additional question for you:
2. How do you intend to use the bike: (you can pick more than one answer)
2.a. racing (and what format(s) of races do you want to do)
2.b. commuting
2.c. utility cycling (getting groceries, running errands, weekend escapes, short or long touring, other)
2.d. bar hopping (did you recently loose your driver's license and now need a set of wheels? Hey, it's real reason some have.)
2.e. other (fill in the blank)

20 speed and 12 speed are ways to describe a multi-geared bike. Back in the old days there was a 10-speed which had five cogs on the rear wheel and two chainrings on the cranks so 2 times 5 equalled 10. These days many people will just count the rear cogs, so a 7-speed will have seven cogs on the rear, then they'll factor in how many chainrings are on the cranks (usually two or three (aka: a triple)). Many people these days no longer do the math to figure out the total possible gearing combinations, so no more 7 x 3 = 21 stuff. Well, some still do the math, and that's okay, but I don't, and that's okay too.

Your next step, and really the only way to know first hand, is to borrow bikes from friends or relatives or visit bike shops and test sit on a whole bunch of bikes so you can begin to get a feel for how the different general geometries feel. Some bikes are set up to put you in a very upright and compact riding position, others will put you into a very bent over and stretched out position. Only you and your answers to question 2 will determine what style of geometry will work for you. There is no shortcut here, you have to put in the work, otherwise you will just have to accept what you get if you don't take the time to do this.

Consider cars instead of bikes, there are pickup trucks and vans and station wagons and SUV's and sportscars and SMART cars and a whole lot of variations within each general category. For pickups there are 2-door, 4-door, short bed, long bed, standard cab, extended cab, 2 wheel drive, 4 wheel drive, dual and single tires on the back, 1/4 ton, 1/2 ton, 1 ton, 2 ton capacities, and hybrid engines and diesel and gas and 4-cylinder and 5-cylinder and 6-cylinder and 8-cylinder and 10-cylinder engines, there are V-format engines and straight engines. What you get really depends on what you want to use it for and what you feel or think you'd like best to have. I can't pick your pickup for you because I'm not the one who will be driving it. Now if you want to buy me a pickup then give me a 3/4ton cab and a half with an 8'bed and 4wheel drive and a manual tranny with a full trailer towing package including a trailer brake controller, even if I don't put more than 5,000 miles on it in a year that pickup truck format will do 99.5% of everything I'd need a pickup for.

Hmmm, this became book length, so I'll stop here before someone whacked me with a greasy pedal wrench. :D

Hope this helps, and if not then I hope it didn't hurt.
 

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get a used bike. you can get a 2k bike when new for 1/3 of the price and usually from new to used their is not much of a difference
 

· Colorado Springs, CO
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BoootyHoIe said:
Well all I'm asking for is what brand of Road Bike should I get?
I am a newbie to Road Cycling so help me out!
There the specifications on like 20-speed or 12-speed whatever that is, which I need info on what the heck that is too. =D

How can I choose the right Road Bike? Also, what bikes are you guys personally using? I'm looking for a Good/Pro bike that's affordable. 1,000 Range.

My recommendations:

1) If you are planning on doing any hills, get a bike with a triple chain ring in the front and as many gears in the back that are available. More gears equals more choices. You'll find bikes now with 20, 27, or 30 speeds on them.

2) You can get a good bike in the $800 to $1600 range.

3) Do your research first: on this site, the Internet, old issues of cycling, VeloNews. Get the nomenclature down and what to look for.

4) Important things to me: Triple front chain ring, carbon fiber forks (road vibration dampening), carbon fiber seat post (road vibration dampening, but this can be swapped out later).

5) Go to a gear-head bike shop. One where roadies work. Tell them what you are about to embark on, where you want to start price wise. when you choose a bike, they'll be able to fit it to you. The fitting is important because on a road bike, literally very small differences in adjustments can make your bike a nice ride or a torture device.

6) Go into this with some choices for bikes and price ranges, but don't get too focused on your choices. I went into a bike shop with three carefully researched finalists, starting from zero bike experience in December 2004. One was too small, another had too mushy of a frame, and the last one just felt plain too goofy to ride. So much for the research. I spent about 3 more hours trying other bikes before I found THE bike. You'll know it is THE bike right away. Music will blare from the heavens, podium girls will want to kiss your cheeks, you'll instantly start to lose weight and build muscle and stamina and be ready for century ride in just a few days. Well, the music part may be an exaggeration.

7) Trek, Specialized, Giant, Felt, LeMonde, Bianchi, and others all make great bikes. You just have to find the right one that is in your price range. Check their web sites. Then go drool at the Pinarello and Colnago bikes.

8) Wheels, components, saddles can all be swapped out as your riding gets better. If you start with a good frame that fits you well, you can swap out and upgrade parts as your riding improves and stuff wears out. As you begin, riding will be just as you remembered it when you were a kid. Just pedal and go from Point A to Point B. As your riding improves, you'll start to notice how your body fits to the bike, under what conditions stuff feels like in your legs, shoulders, arms. Then you'll start to make adjustments from there and start swapping out parts . Tires were the first thing for me. Then a new saddle when the original one wore out. A new wheelset when the first one wore out. Etc. Etc.

9) More web sites to check out to catch the bug, cruise the rider postings:

www.sheldonbrown.com
www.ridetherockies.com
www.bicycletourcolorado.com
www.coppertriangle.com
www.bvbf.org
..and this site (RBR) has a lot to offer too!

10) Training: I find that the road bike training is only 1/3rd of road bike training. The other 2/3rds are a) strength/core/weight/circuit training. Cyclists are known for their lack of core and upper body strength. Weight training that concentrates in these areas, while at the same time doing some strength training for your legs also, helps the road cycling overall by toning up your whole body (do a 45 minute circuit 2 times a week). The other part is what I think of as cycling fundamentals. I am in my 4th year of road cycling (started when I was 47), and bought a spin bike this year mainly so that I could cycle when the weather was bad. Boy was I surprised at the improvement in my road cycling that the spin bike did. Wish I started the trainer/spin sessions sooner than I did (I use the SPINERVALS DVDs), and do this about 2 or 3 times a week. Other items that help are to clean up your diet (don't go overboard, but we can all make small changes in our eating habits for the better), and to do a stretching routine after every exercise session (bike, spin/trainer, weight circuit).

11) Not too much too fast. Sign up for a ride at the end of this summer somewhere (a metric century would be good: 100KM or 62 miles), then work back your training, gradually increasing the miles as you go through the weeks. A good training guide to follow is here: http://www.ridetherockies.com/training.asp Maybe cut the mileage specifications in half the first three or four weeks (i.e., do week 1 twice, then week 2 twice, but start at half the mileage for each week, then start over at week 1 after the 4 week start-up period).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There is no "best", there is no "right", there is only what you end up choosing and later deciding if you still like your choice. What is best and right today might not be best and right once you get a few miles on your legs and cycling.

You have set a budget, that is good, but does that budget factor in accessories like shoes and helmet and gloves and a multi tool and a seat bag to carry stuff in? Will you want to ride in street clothes or will you want to get all lycra'd out? Are you looking at using the bike for road racing, and if so will it be criteriums or road races or time trials? Are you going to be using the bike for commuting, or general exercise and just riding around for fun and for something to do?

The better you form parameters of what you're looking for the better your final decision will be. And if you don't have any or many answers yet then just provide what you do know so far.

With all that said I will submit one question to you:
1. Do you prefer or want or desire:
1.a. Steel frame and forks
1.b. Aluminum frame and forks
1.c. carbon fiber frame and forks
1.d. a combination (such as a steel frame and a c/f fork)
1.e. other
1.f. No preference or don't know yet or haven't formed an opinion yet.

I will also submit one additional question for you:
2. How do you intend to use the bike: (you can pick more than one answer)
2.a. racing (and what format(s) of races do you want to do)
2.b. commuting
2.c. utility cycling (getting groceries, running errands, weekend escapes, short or long touring, other)
2.d. bar hopping (did you recently loose your driver's license and now need a set of wheels? Hey, it's real reason some have.)
2.e. other (WELL, I am planning to use the bike to exercise, and most imporantly to have fun.)

20 speed and 12 speed are ways to describe a multi-geared bike. Back in the old days there was a 10-speed which had five cogs on the rear wheel and two chainrings on the cranks so 2 times 5 equalled 10. These days many people will just count the rear cogs, so a 7-speed will have seven cogs on the rear, then they'll factor in how many chainrings are on the cranks (usually two or three (aka: a triple)). Many people these days no longer do the math to figure out the total possible gearing combinations, so no more 7 x 3 = 21 stuff. Well, some still do the math, and that's okay, but I don't, and that's okay too.

Your next step, and really the only way to know first hand, is to borrow bikes from friends or relatives or visit bike shops and test sit on a whole bunch of bikes so you can begin to get a feel for how the different general geometries feel. Some bikes are set up to put you in a very upright and compact riding position, others will put you into a very bent over and stretched out position. Only you and your answers to question 2 will determine what style of geometry will work for you. There is no shortcut here, you have to put in the work, otherwise you will just have to accept what you get if you don't take the time to do this.

Consider cars instead of bikes, there are pickup trucks and vans and station wagons and SUV's and sportscars and SMART cars and a whole lot of variations within each general category. For pickups there are 2-door, 4-door, short bed, long bed, standard cab, extended cab, 2 wheel drive, 4 wheel drive, dual and single tires on the back, 1/4 ton, 1/2 ton, 1 ton, 2 ton capacities, and hybrid engines and diesel and gas and 4-cylinder and 5-cylinder and 6-cylinder and 8-cylinder and 10-cylinder engines, there are V-format engines and straight engines. What you get really depends on what you want to use it for and what you feel or think you'd like best to have. I can't pick your pickup for you because I'm not the one who will be driving it. Now if you want to buy me a pickup then give me a 3/4ton cab and a half with an 8'bed and 4wheel drive and a manual tranny with a full trailer towing package including a trailer brake controller, even if I don't put more than 5,000 miles on it in a year that pickup truck format will do 99.5% of everything I'd need a pickup for.

Hmmm, this became book length, so I'll stop here before someone whacked me with a greasy pedal wrench. :D

Hope this helps, and if not then I hope it didn't hurt.
 

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BoootyHoIe said:
1.f. No preference or don't know yet or haven't formed an opinion yet.

2.a. racing (and what format(s) of races do you want to do)
2.b. commuting
2.e. other (WELL, I am planning to use the bike to exercise, and most imporantly to have fun.)
The shop I wrench at part time (side job, for fun and discounts) is a Trek dealership, so factor this reply accordingly and don't rule out other brands.

Look at the specs of the following on the www.trekbikes.com web site, they have suggested MSRP prices listed for comparison.
1 series: 1.5 and 1.2
Pilot 2.1
2. series: 2.1 and 2.3
Madone 4.5 (entry level Madone if you want the Madone name)

I've got a Lemond Fillmore that has become my primary bike.
You might look at the Lemond Reno and Lemond Zurich if you can find one on closeout or old stock in inventory at a local shop.

I've also got a Colnago MasterLight that I've used in a crit before and for generic fun riding. Handles very nice, likes to turn, definitely not a touring bike (even though I do have a BOB trailer skewer on it and have towed the trailer with it to the annoyance of a few purists :arf: ).

A lot of folks really like the GT line of bikes, and many people really like their Specialized bikes.

Your racing interest says to look at performance oriented road bikes, probably a 9 or 10 speed (my ML has an 8-speed), brifters (brake shifters), compare Campagnolo and Shimano and SRAM component groups as each one operates slightly differently.

Don't get caught up in the weight wars, that can come later in your experience (if it even ever becomes a concern).

If you have any thoughts at all about ever running a rear rack on your bike then start leaning towards the commuter bikes.

Hope this helps a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Ok, well I spotted out this bike - http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-US/bikes/road/1243/29268/

Now what I'm wondering, since IM NEW TO ROAD CYCLING, is 10-speed fine?
I know there's like 20-speed +, etc. BUT, what's the deal with these #-speed?

Hmm, also, do you guys know the weight of this bike? I can't seem to find it.

Most importantly, do you guys think this bike is good?

Oh yeah, Shimano PD M505, clipless. What does clipless mean? I can't clip it?
Or it doesnt come with the clip for the shoe?
 

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BoootyHoIe said:
Ok, well I spotted out this bike - https://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-US/bikes/road/1243/29268/

Now what I'm wondering, since IM NEW TO ROAD CYCLING, is 10-speed fine?
I know there's like 20-speed +, etc. BUT, what's the deal with these #-speed?

Hmm, also, do you guys know the weight of this bike? I can't seem to find it.

Most importantly, do you guys think this bike is good?

Oh yeah, Shimano PD M505, clipless. What does clipless mean? I can't clip it?
Or it doesnt come with the clip for the shoe?
That bike is definitely not good. I would be surprised if you don't die on your first ride on that thing.

You should really consider something like this:

 
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