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Lemond Rider
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I am looking for a trailer bike for my son. I would love a Burley Piccolo, but can't justify the price tag.

I have heard that the Trek, Giant, and Adams have re-designed their hitches so they don't develop the "wobble" that they have in the past. True?

Any recommendations or experiences to share?
 

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I have the Adams Trail-a-bike and love it. Purchased about 5 years ago when my son was little. Have put many miles on it with my son and now my daughter.

The thing is built like a tank, and pulls real well. Never had a wobble problem. Generally the only problem that I have is when the passenger leans from side to side, this makes for some handling issues.

I have also found that it is much easier to pull with a MTB instead of a road bike.
 

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I have a Giant Half-Wheeler. I was looking for a trail-a-bike that folded and had gears. I've not heard of any wobble issues and haven't experienced any problems.

As someone else mentioned, the handling can be sketchy at times. I used my road bike the first time out and it was interesting. I've used a MTB since then and the handling is much easier.

BTW: My daughter loves it!!!
 

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We've had a Halfwheeler for a year and it's great. No wobbling. As the boy turnes 6 he's beginning to master the gearing and adds force to the ride.

After an incident with a friend's kid actually sit back down on the wheel while riding we added a bike rack for protection.

The mudguard serves no purpose. You need a long snug fender to provide any protection when the road is wet.
 

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Yep - works great and not 'heavy'....

mlind said:
Have you used it? I've been qurious about it but never seen it in action.
How heavy is it?

Actually, 'heavy' is not real important at this time - as you are hauling a kid around on a bike - so whether it's the trailgator, or one of the tag-alongs - with a kid in it - 'heavy' becomes pretty much irrelevant.

Yes, I used it for one of my kids - it works great - pretty stable (unless your kid is into rapid leaning motion!) and can connect to the bike (disconnect) pretty quickly.

Probably you do *NOT* want to use it on your nice and shiny road bike - but on some sort of commuter or beater as how it connects to the saddle post is rather 'aggressive' - so you'll want to get a different saddle post than your 'normal' one - get an inexpensive aluminum one from somewhere.

but yeah, it works good
 

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My daughter rides a Trek Mountain Train. She has over 1000 miles on it, including a week long, 50 miles a day, tour. We're doing out second week long tour in June and this will be our last. Time to upgrade to a tandem, we feal that we enjoy it enough to justify the expence.

Things I like about the Trek are: 24" wheel instead of 20" ( we run a smoothie tire) and a 7 speed drivetrain. Also, it's pretty stable. Haley is very good about not leaning out to look in front of us.

What I don't like is the weight. It weighs 25 lbs. without the handle bar bag. I do have heavy pedals on it, but they keep her feet secure. With the hitch and saddle bag, my big steel Lemond weights 24.5 lbs. Once you add the bar bags, water, snacks and everything else your wife insists on you takeing, it becomes quite the load. That's why I'm pushing for the tandem.

Good luck
Shayne

 

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Cheese is my copilot
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I used a Trek Mtn Train for about 2 years with my son. The attachment to the bike was very secure and the whole thing held up well. Two of my friends currently use the Giants, and there's far more side-to-side wobble than with the Trek.

What you really need is a tandem with child stoker cranks. ;)

 

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Protect saddle post

SweetRDR said:
Probably you do *NOT* want to use it on your nice and shiny road bike - but on some sort of commuter or beater as how it connects to the saddle post is rather 'aggressive' - so you'll want to get a different saddle post than your 'normal' one - get an inexpensive aluminum one from somewhere.
I covered my carbon saddlepost with 2'' of 18/25 tube. Works fine as protection.
 
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