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My new Synapse will be here this week, I'll be doing most of my rides early mornings (i.e.: 4-5am) before anyone wakes up.

Since it will be dark, what recommendations do you have for the best (brightest) light / tail light combo?

I'm ok spending some extra on this since it will still be pitch black outside.

Thanks!
 

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I like the night rider solas but any that are extremely bright, rechargeable with a USB plug and bright will work. Most important is location and alignment!!! After installing the light, step back and verify that it's visible and not covered by the bag or your seat.
 

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for a taillight, the planet bike superflash is really popular. some use two of them. they're $20 on ebay.
 

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Since you are riding in the dark... I would choose any 700+ lumen front light. If I had to do it over again, I would choose the Bontrager 700/800 RT since it matches to my Garmin in regards to daylight flashing versus constant on during the dark. And, the Bontrager Flare fits the bill for daylight riding for me.
 

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Since you are riding in the dark... I would choose any 700+ lumen front light. If I had to do it over again, I would choose the Bontrager 700/800 RT since it matches to my Garmin in regards to daylight flashing versus constant on during the dark. And, the Bontrager Flare fits the bill for daylight riding for me.
I second bontrager
 

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I like Cygolite for durability. The beam should be bright enough that you can't outride it, and no brighter. Very bright lights annoy oncoming traffic.
 

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I like Cygolite for durability. The beam should be bright enough that you can't outride it, and no brighter. Very bright lights annoy oncoming traffic.
I have a Cygolte - two actually - 650 and 800. They have hot swappable batteries and sometimes I'll stick the battery from one in my jersey so that I can ride twice as far.

Definitely 700+ lumens (don't see much diff between the 800 and 650 though). I have a hotshot mini 2 for the rear.
 

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I'm running the Exposure Strada 1200 for headlight. It has a road specific beam, and great runtimes (depending on program). It also has a few other nice features.

For tail, I have the older Ofros Flare, with the new "Flare Pro" on order. New version has (10) brightness levels, 360 degree visibility, and allows for external battery (you pick run times). Helpful for using light for long day rides.

http://www.orfos.us

[video]https://youtu.be/SH7ZFoBZGnA?t=173[/video]

Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire Bicycle handlebar Bicycle frame Bicycle wheel rim
 

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I use a Dinotte 300R on the rear, 200 lumens and a Light and Motion Urban 300 (300 lumens) up front. I started using this combo in 2012 for early morning/daytime riding when I lived in Singapore and have continued since moving back to the States where I now ride mainly during the daytime.

I recently bought a Bontrager Ion 100 for the front, 100 lumens and use it on a second bike having extra mounts on my rides for the Dinotte.

They all have USB recharging and blinking modes.
 

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I'm usually not very picky about stuff like this, but I have formed a pretty solid opinion on bike lights. I used to always run a Planet Bike Superflash, as they are very bright. However, I frequently put my bike in a stand (using the seatpost to secure the bike). Many of these lights attach with a mount that has to be screwed on. Many allow you to easily remove the light but the mount has to stay. The best position on my seatpost is fairly low. This means I have to either unscrew the mount or remove the saddle bag to get the bike on the stand. Until recently, the easily removable mounts came with really weak lights.

I now use the Bontrager Ion 100R front and rear lights. They are plenty bright, easy to mount, and rechargeable.

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/equipment/cycling-accessories/bike-lights/bontrager-ion-100-r/flare-r-city-light-set/p/14259/?colorCode=black
 

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I recommend you absolutely cover yourself and your bike in reflective gear.

Buy reflective vinyl and stick it all over your bike. Pedals, cranks, stays, frame, fork, seatpost, helmet, everything. Only wear reflective clothing, don't wear anything that doesn't have reflective elements at least. Mix up red and white reflection too, all rearward facing stuff should be red.

Having a little blinky light is nice and all but be real. Do some research on what time of day cyclists are hit and killed most.
 

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I've been bike commuting for over 20 years. The first light system I owned was from Bike Nashbar. It had a lead-acid battery that strapped over the top tube, and two lamps that must have pumped out 75 lumens each strapped to either side of the bars next to the stem. If the system were fully charged (that took over night), it ran for maybe an hour. I think I paid $150 for it, and this was in the early 1990's.

Lighting systems these day are SO MUCH BETTER. The LED lights are bright, the lithium battery holds a charge for hours and recharges really quick, and they've gotten so cheap that I have a light for all of my bikes. Used to be whatever bike I installed a light on got ridden all winter. I like Magic Shine, but there's a ton of other brands. You don't need to spend $100+, or buy a branded light like Niterider or Cygolite. Look for one that's advertised at 900 or more lumens. One of my cheapo Magic Shine systems is on it's fourth year. I never had a Niterider system last that long.
 

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I have a Cygolte - two actually - 650 and 800. They have hot swappable batteries and sometimes I'll stick the battery from one in my jersey so that I can ride twice as far.

Definitely 700+ lumens (don't see much diff between the 800 and 650 though). I have a hotshot mini 2 for the rear.
I have same ones and they are both great lights:

https://cygolite.com/product/expilion-850-usb/

https://cygolite.com/product/hotrod-50-usb/

These lights are their brightest ones that don't require an external battery. Keep in mind that lumen ratings on lights are the maximum they are capable of. If you run them in the brightest mode, battery life will be short, so you may want to carry a spare battery just in case. You can always choose to run your headlight a little dimmer or in flash mode in order to save battery.
 

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I've been bike commuting for over 20 years. The first light system I owned was from Bike Nashbar. It had a lead-acid battery that strapped over the top tube, and two lamps that must have pumped out 75 lumens each strapped to either side of the bars next to the stem. If the system were fully charged (that took over night), it ran for maybe an hour. I think I paid $150 for it, and this was in the early 1990's.

Lighting systems these day are SO MUCH BETTER. The LED lights are bright, the lithium battery holds a charge for hours and recharges really quick, and they've gotten so cheap that I have a light for all of my bikes. Used to be whatever bike I installed a light on got ridden all winter. I like Magic Shine, but there's a ton of other brands. You don't need to spend $100+, or buy a branded light like Niterider or Cygolite. Look for one that's advertised at 900 or more lumens. One of my cheapo Magic Shine systems is on it's fourth year. I never had a Niterider system last that long.

The problem with El Cheapo advertised at 900 Lumens (or any "bright" "sounding" number)...oodles and gobs of those claims are simply outright lies, added to underperforming products to sell them to the easily fooled. Result your "1200 Lumen" El Cheapo is not as bright at 20ft as an old 300 lumen branded light. and sorting out the BS claims must be a retailer-listing-product-specific basis. You see it on many of the unbranded LED (flashlight and bike-light) light reviews on Amazon, where a consumer with a known spec'd light that was supposed to be outperformed with an "upgrade" is not at all outperformed if not the opposite.

Most of the engineering in a good light is not the LED, it is the reflector element around it....even if the light-element actually performs up to claimed spec.
 
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