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Hello all,

I'm hoping someone might be willing to offer recommendations about purchasing a suitable road bike, given the following background:

I'm an injured long distance runner (Achilles), and since the injury still hasn't healed after 4+ years, I've been cycling to maintain fitness (about 120-150 miles weekly). I have a 15+ year old Raleigh 21-speed mountain bike which has been poorly maintained (partly because I'm always thinking my injury will finally heal and I'll be back running),

But since I can't heal the injury, I'd like to focus more seriously on cycling training, maybe even race eventually. My rusted-chain/creaking mountain bike simply couldn't keep up with the pace of even a semi-serious group ride, so I'm trying to find and purchase a good road bicycle, with some of the following criteria (and lacking expertise in competitive cycling, I'm probably overlooking quite a few important criteria):


1. Drivetrain/gear set which would allow someone with good enough fitness to hit 20+ mph in a pack (or faster if fitness allows!)

2. Relatively low maintenance (durable tires/drivetrain/etc., not needing to be constantly replaced)

3. Easy to maintain for someone without great mechanical aptitude (i.e., myself


4. Suitable for more serious training (150-220 miles weekly), maybe even a race down the line

5. Price of $600-800 (possibly up to $900, but if possible I'd like to keep it under)


I visited a local shop and was recommended two specific bikes: the Fuji Roubaix 2.0 LE Road Bike, for $999, and the Fuki Tread 1.0 LE Road, also $999. The prices are (for my budget) pretty high, but they include $200 worth of store credit and free lifetime adjustments, so I'm wondering if that might partially justify the cost vs. a cheaper online alternative.

Apologies if any of these questions suggest undue naivete of cycling terminology or other basics, but I am new to the competitive side of the sport, and appreciate any advice offered.
 

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Both bikes meet your 5 point checklist.

Get the Roubaix as it has rim brakes vs. disc brakes. I feel rim brakes are easier to service. Otherwise, there's not much difference between the 2 bikes. Right now, the most important thing for you is to get the proper size.

You can't go wrong with virtually ANY brand of bike out there-Fuji, Giant, Specialized, Trek, Raleigh; whatever. So find one within your budget, get the accessories, and go.

Definitely get yourself some clipless pedals and shoes. Helmet, gloves, cycling shorts, and a jersey. You'll need a saddle bag to carry your "stuff" so make sure it fits whatever you carry. I carry a wallet, keys, 2 tubes, patch kit, tire levers, and a multitool; roughly 100-120 cu.in. . Don't forget a pump, 2 waterbottle cages, and of course, the bottles.

Adding up all the accessories, you may have to downsize your budget to afford these necessities.
 

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Hello all,

I'm hoping someone might be willing to offer recommendations about purchasing a suitable road bike, given the following background:

I'm an injured long distance runner (Achilles), and since the injury still hasn't healed after 4+ years, I've been cycling to maintain fitness (about 120-150 miles weekly). I have a 15+ year old Raleigh 21-speed mountain bike which has been poorly maintained (partly because I'm always thinking my injury will finally heal and I'll be back running),

But since I can't heal the injury, I'd like to focus more seriously on cycling training, maybe even race eventually. My rusted-chain/creaking mountain bike simply couldn't keep up with the pace of even a semi-serious group ride, so I'm trying to find and purchase a good road bicycle, with some of the following criteria (and lacking expertise in competitive cycling, I'm probably overlooking quite a few important criteria):


1. Drivetrain/gear set which would allow someone with good enough fitness to hit 20+ mph in a pack (or faster if fitness allows!)

2. Relatively low maintenance (durable tires/drivetrain/etc., not needing to be constantly replaced)

3. Easy to maintain for someone without great mechanical aptitude (i.e., myself


4. Suitable for more serious training (150-220 miles weekly), maybe even a race down the line

5. Price of $600-800 (possibly up to $900, but if possible I'd like to keep it under)


I visited a local shop and was recommended two specific bikes: the Fuji Roubaix 2.0 LE Road Bike, for $999, and the Fuki Tread 1.0 LE Road, also $999. The prices are (for my budget) pretty high, but they include $200 worth of store credit and free lifetime adjustments, so I'm wondering if that might partially justify the cost vs. a cheaper online alternative.

Apologies if any of these questions suggest undue naivete of cycling terminology or other basics, but I am new to the competitive side of the sport, and appreciate any advice offered.
I'd vote for the Fuji Roubaix 2.0 LE. It looks like a full on race bike, but with "comfortable" geometry for all day riding. If LBS gives $200 accessory credit, that'll cover about 2/3rd of shorts, jersey, shoes, clipless pedals, et. al. and you could collect some of that down the line as you ride. Already have helmet, right?

You're looking for drop handlebar road bikes. They'll all have competitive gearing for club rides and races. IMO, "compact gearing" i.e. 50/34 in front will give up a couple of highest gears, but you'll only miss them when everyone is sprinting for the finish in a race.

If LBS [Performance?] has your size, grab that Roubaix. It'll get you in the pack.

Spring the money. Anything cheaper will be entry level and not that great. The bike is a couple of quality points above entry level. Go for it! It's a great deal with the $200 credit!

Agree with Peter: disc brakes on the other bike would be great if you have to ride in rain a lot or live on a mountain. But they're an evolving technology and will improve as time goes on. Rim brakes work as well on dry roads and are easier to keep adjusted. They'll be a viable option well into the future.
 

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Since you mentioned you don't want much maintenance, the local bike shop (LBS) is the way to go. Ask the shop to test ride or demo both bikes and the one that fits better is your bike.
 

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The bike that fits and feels best to you when set up properly is the right bike. Especially for 'distance' riding (as opposed to fast, short, racy stuff).

The support of your LBS (perhaps included service), warranty from the manufacturer, etc are also important factors.

I wouldn't worry too much about the specific components, as within that price range, they are going to be fairly similar. The possibly exception might be wheels, however wheels are usually the first thing people upgrade, so take that into consideration.
 
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