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I bought a new in box 180mm Record 10 UT crankset from an eBay selling in Portugal earlier this year for around $400. He had sold a few for around that price, but I don't see any currently listed.

I don't know this seller, but this looks like a good deal on a Super Record 11:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220554035360

Check prices from the UK sellers, of course. I bought some Chorus 11 shifters from Wiggle for about $240 with shipping.

I'm also watching this 180mm Zipp VumaQuad, which looks like it could be refinished, but have been reading a lot of bad reviews on this crank, so I doubt that I'll bid:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Zipp-VumaQuad-Compact-Crank-180mm-/220625319531
 

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Need?

JM714 said:
I need a Campagnolo Record 10s UT crankset in 180. Prefer new, but would settle for a used one in good shape. I can't seem to find one out there.

Any ideas?
I have to ask: are you sure you "need" 180 mm cranks. Lots of people read formulas for crank length and think they need proportional cranks. The "logic" of "crank length should be proportional to leg measurements" has been around for a LONG time, and lots of people have turned that "logic" into a formula for determining crank length. Only one problem: the research doesn't support it. One key feature that is often ignored in these discussions is the duration of muscle contraction that is controlled by cadence. It just may be that there is an optimum here, which is why there is a fairly narrow range of cadence for optimum performance. Longer cranks tend to mean lower cadence, moving you out of that optimum range. Crank length has been a point of debate since the introduction of the "safety" bicycle in the late 1800s, and there have been all sorts of fads in that regard.

There is no reliable formula for predicting crank length. There ARE lots of formulas out there, but they are just figments of the imagination of their purveyors. No one has ever done a study that shows how crank length should relate to anything.

You will find no high quality data to support any particular crank length as being better than any other. This is true whether or not you correct for leg length, femur length, etc. On the other hand, you will find lots of anecdotal or low quality data to support all kinds of conclusions, and more theories than you can shake a stick at. A rider's response to changes in crank length is 1) highly individual, 2) dependent on riding style and the event (TT, climbing, crits, track racing, etc.), and 3) most important, highly adaptive. This is why it is so hard to study the effect of crank length.

A 2008 study by Jim Martin, Ph.D., from the University of Utah shows zero correlation between crank length and any performance factors.
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Fred Matheny Summary: There have been studies of crankarm length, but the results aren't consistent. Some show that longer cranks provide greater leverage for turning big gears. Some show that shorter cranks foster greater speed via a faster cadence. And some show that crank length is completely individual.
 

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I'm sure he doesn't need 180 cranks, any more than he needs a hamburger instead of tuna salad. Some of us prefer them over other lengths, which is enough. I supposed if he'd just said that he's "looking for" a pair, he could've been spared your trying to talk him out of them.
 

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Kerry -

I started using 180's over 12 years ago on my mtb and from there made the switch to 180's on the road. I am 6'5" with a 37.5" inseam so it's not like I'm a little guy trying to force something. When I made the switch on the mtb I noticed a difference right away, it just felt more comfortable. I have thought about going back to 175's but that would mean buying two new cranksets for my bikes. I am looking for a 180 because I'm building a new bike up and I want all my bikes to be the same. I am afraid that if I have a different crank length on one bike it might cause knee problems. I'm going to look up that study you mentioned. Running 175's would make life simpler sometimes I guess.
 
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