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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a minor issue that resulted in a fair amount of blood loss from a venous rupture. Three days after the episode I went for a bike ride. This was only 4 days after my previous ride. I was much slower on even moderate climbs. Now three weeks post blood loss, my hemoglobin and Red Blood Count are 20-25% less than my normal. I am on an iron supplement. What can I do to speed up the return of my oxygen carrying cells and my fitness?

Anxious to get back to where I was.

Thanks
 

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Assuming you talked to a physician and asked the same question as you posted, self help ideas: Patience. Healthy food intake. Read up on how to achieve autophagy.
 

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wow interesting. i'd give it another 2-3 weeks to see if your red blood cell count is back to normal. Hopefully it will be.
As for fitness, you'll need time to regain it, but fitness should be the least of your concerns right now.
 

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I would ask a doctor instead of some random internet strangers.

You didn't say how much blood you lost, so I'll assume similar to a donation.
According to a doctor on RunnersWorld
The recovery time, in theory, is about 60 days.

the red blood cell mass replacement can take about two months. If you are well trained, you will not notice the drop in hemoglobin level at rest, or even with light to moderate exercise.
When you push toward your training or race threshold, the lower red cell mass will become apparent.
If you are going for a time or trying to make a Boston qualifier, the loss would probably make a noticeable difference for several weeks.
Most people, however, will be reasonably recovered by two weeks and functionally recovered by three to four weeks, if the body has an adequate store and ongoing source of the required ingredients—protein and iron—to replace the lost hemoglobin.
For most, eating a balanced diet with protein and iron intake is sufficient. Vegetarians and some female runners may require iron supplementation. This should be discussed with your physician. For the most part, men have adequate iron stores and can be at risk from too much iron supplementation.

I would recommend giving yourself a couple of days off after donating to regain your fluid volume before resuming your training. Wait at least a month before running a serious race, meaning a marathon or fast-paced shorter race. Two months would be safest, especially if you plan to run at an altitude that is higher than where you usually live and train.
 

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"I would ask a doctor instead of some random internet strangers." TLG says, as he proceeds to dispense medical advice.
Derp
I didn't dispense any medical advice to the OP. Assumptions and theory isn't medical advice.
Clearly... loss of blood causes a loss in fitness and requires recovery. The OP should... ask a doctor about HIS particular situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would ask a doctor instead of some random internet strangers.

You didn't say how much blood you lost, so I'll assume similar to a donation.
According to a doctor on RunnersWorld
The recovery time, in theory, is about 60 days.

the red blood cell mass replacement can take about two months. If you are well trained, you will not notice the drop in hemoglobin level at rest, or even with light to moderate exercise.
When you push toward your training or race threshold, the lower red cell mass will become apparent.
If you are going for a time or trying to make a Boston qualifier, the loss would probably make a noticeable difference for several weeks.
Most people, however, will be reasonably recovered by two weeks and functionally recovered by three to four weeks, if the body has an adequate store and ongoing source of the required ingredients—protein and iron—to replace the lost hemoglobin.
For most, eating a balanced diet with protein and iron intake is sufficient. Vegetarians and some female runners may require iron supplementation. This should be discussed with your physician. For the most part, men have adequate iron stores and can be at risk from too much iron supplementation.

I would recommend giving yourself a couple of days off after donating to regain your fluid volume before resuming your training. Wait at least a month before running a serious race, meaning a marathon or fast-paced shorter race. Two months would be safest, especially if you plan to run at an altitude that is higher than where you usually live and train.
Thanks Tig. The linked article was interesting and it corroborates a few things. 1) it will take time to restore the red blood cells and 2) it is more noticeable at the higher end of exertion. Using may wife as a gauge, on the flats I can ride the same pace. On longer hills I fall behind whereas before I would pull away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Obviously I did see a doctor. The reason for the blood loss is not likely to happen again. Other than prescribing an iron supplement and setting up a followup test to make sure I am progressing, there was not any other guidance. What I was asking this esteemed group if anybody had any knowledge of what exercise factors may help the recovery: low intensity vs. intervals, frequency (more or less), resistance training, etc.
 

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After many posts, the details come out. Why not state this 1st thing?


Obviously I did see a doctor. The reason for the blood loss is not likely to happen again. Other than prescribing an iron supplement and setting up a followup test to make sure I am progressing, there was not any other guidance. What I was asking this esteemed group if anybody had any knowledge of what exercise factors may help the recovery: low intensity vs. intervals, frequency (more or less), resistance training, etc.
 
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