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my favourite jersey would be perfect if it didnt bunch up around my arms - short of cutting the ends off, is there a way to get the elastic out of there?
 

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I don't know if it works on jerseys, frankly my arms aren't buff enough to have that problem,:17: but on cycling caps my big head starts to hurt. I make one cut perpendicular throught he elastic and it relieves a lot of the tension. You might be able to take out a chunk of it. completely removing it though I would think would lead to the jersey unraveling unless you hemmed it. Then again I am not a seamstress.
 

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Find somebody who knows a tiny bit about sewing. No big deal. You'll need to remove stitches on a bit of the hem seam, cut the elastic, maybe remove a few more stitches if the elastic is tacked in several places, then repair the cut places. Can't really be explained over the internet, but it would be easy for someone to show you in person.

There don't seem to be a lot of sewing-savvy folks on this board, IME.
 

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If you can do basic sewing, there's no reason you can't do it at home. I don't see any reason to take it to a seamstress or tailor.

Is the elastic stitched to the fabric in such a way that it rubs directly on your skin and there are stitches running all the way through the elastic (see exhibit A) or is the elastic sitting inside the hem (as in, not visible and doesn't directly touch your skin) and only stitched to the fabric at the seam (see exhibit B)?

If the elastic is like in exhibit A, then my next question is, is the stitching that attaches the elastic the same stitching that is the hem of the sleeve? If it is not, all you need to do is get yourself a seam ripper, which is available at any fabric store (or even the sewing section at a Walmart). They are not expensive. All you need is a cheap one. Then proceed to rip out the stitches that attach the elastic, one by one, until the whole thread slides out.

If the stitching on the elastic is also the hem, then you will still rip out the seams (being careful not to stab the seam ripper through the fabric) and you will then need to re-hem the sleeves. If you don't have a machine, you can hem them by hand, but if you have never sewed anything before, I don't recommend you try this. Find someone who can re-hem them for you, because you do not want the fabric unraveling.

If the elastic is stitched like in exhibit B, then what you need to do is rip out the seam where the circle of fabric was sewn together (see exhibit C). Don't rip out the entire thing. Rip out just enough that you can sneak a small scissors inside to snip the elastic off the seam and pull it out. Make sure you do this on the inside of the shirt because now you have to fix the hole you just made. You can do this even if you've never sewn before. Get a needle and some thread. Thread the needle, but do not tie a knot at the end. When you begin sewing, leave several inches of the thread hanging out of where you first put in the needle. You will use this later to tie the knot. Stitch up the hole, it doesn't have to be neat because if you followed instructions, this will be on the inside of your shirt where no one will see it. Just make sure you're not sewing through the front of the shirt and making a big mess out of it. Once the hole is stitched, make a few stitches going back to where that thread it hanging off and tie a small knot (a double or triple granny knot should work, if it's tight enough). Cut off any excess thread and you are done!

Hopefully that helps. Like someone else said, it is hard to explain over the internet. Let me know if you need anything clarified. (And please excuse the pathetic Paint illustrations!)
 
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