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I'm going up to Vermont later this month to visit family and as a recent convert to road biking that is sadly stuck in Miami, I was very excited at the prospect of being in a nearly traffic-free environment with nearly endless twisting and climbing roads through some epic scenery. However, I won't be able to bring my bike as I'm flying up. I did a little research and it seems that most larger bike shops will rent road bikes for something like $25 a day which is fine, but I was wondering about a couple things. First- Can I bring my shoes and expect to get a bike that has pedals that'll work with my SPD cleats? Or should I just throw my pedals into my suitcase as well and have them attached up there to the rental bike? How about a flat kit? I assume most rentals would have one, but I have no idea. Also, for a more VT-specific question- Does anyone know of a good bike shop that'll rent me a nice road bike in a larger size (58-60cm frame, I'm 6'3") in either Burlington or the Sugarbush/Stowe area? Any tips appreciated.
 

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Google bike shops in the area you want and call them.

Bring plenty of warm gear. It might be plenty warm there but there's potential for it to be really cold especially for someone coming from Miami.
 

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I did a week rental last month when I was out in Seattle and reserved a bike in my size a few weeks in advance. Turns out the 58cm they had reserved for me was severely wrecked a couple days prior to the beginning of my rental so I actually wound up w/ a brand spanking new Defy Advanced 3 from their floor stock as the only other rentals they had available were too small for me.

You should probably be able to work out the details of the pedals in advance when you call shops to rent from. The one I checked out would put whatever type of pedal I wanted on so I just used their SPD-SLs. They also had a flat kit on all their rentals.

Basically I'd say try to reserve a bike ahead of time and verify that you can get SPD pedals on it and if you need to bring your own saddle bag (I'd be surprised if you did). Other that those two I'd say bring your shoes, helmet, bottles, gloves, and appropriate other bits of bike clothing to be prepared for a variety of temps and weather conditions. You might also want to bring along a multi-tool in case the flat kit doesn't include one (mine didn't). If you're a data fiend, your computer and sensor gear are probably good to bring along as well.
 

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I did that rental thing a couple of times, on trips to Maui and Oregon. In addition to clothes for all possible weather, I brought

-saddle
-pedals and shoes
-seatbag containing my usual bring-alongs: tube, patch kit, multi-tool
-helmet

I like to buy local-labeled bottles when I ride somewhere -- makes a little souvenir to remember the trip.
 

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Dan333sp said:
I'm going up to Vermont later this month to visit family and as a recent convert to road biking that is sadly stuck in Miami, I was very excited at the prospect of being in a nearly traffic-free environment with nearly endless twisting and climbing roads through some epic scenery. However, I won't be able to bring my bike as I'm flying up. I did a little research and it seems that most larger bike shops will rent road bikes for something like $25 a day which is fine, but I was wondering about a couple things. First- Can I bring my shoes and expect to get a bike that has pedals that'll work with my SPD cleats? Or should I just throw my pedals into my suitcase as well and have them attached up there to the rental bike? How about a flat kit? I assume most rentals would have one, but I have no idea. Also, for a more VT-specific question- Does anyone know of a good bike shop that'll rent me a nice road bike in a larger size (58-60cm frame, I'm 6'3") in either Burlington or the Sugarbush/Stowe area? Any tips appreciated.
I rented in San Francisco and Monterey California this summer. It was a great way to stay on the bike and rides some nice coastal mountains.

I brought shoes and pedals. It took seconds for the shop to wrench them on/off.

I brought my flat kit but both bikes had a saddle bag with the basics, and a CO2 pump.

When I reserved the bikes the shops asked for height and make and frame size from my current bike. In both shops I needed only minimal adjustments to the seat and I was on the road.

Have fun!
 
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