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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I am a new poster but I have been look at the forums for a little while. I am not sure if this is the correct forum to post this in and if not please let me know.
I just bought a 78 Trek TX900. It's overall in good shape but the paint is scuffed up over all and I want to repaint it. From what I can see the components are in good shape and I can probably reuse most if not all of the them (Shimano 600) The last time I painted a bike frame I used spray cans from the hardware store and it looked like it. I think I had the frame sandblasted (which was a mistake, I know now). I want to paint this frame but I want to do a nice job. I don't want to pay the $200.00 it looks like it will cost for a pro job unless absolutely necessary. I happen to have an air compressor and all the spray equipment which a friend left at my house after painting my car 20 years ago. I have been trying to return the stuff but I can never get hold of him so I thought I might as well use it. I am looking for any suggestions on the painting. I think I will have to buy some paint from an auto store (maybe a quart?). I saw a frame painted on eBay that looked nice but it was a really heavy paint job and I don't want to gob on 10 pounds of paint, I want as thin as possible I would think. Please don't flame me any more then necessary. This is my first excursion into painting an old bike. I am not sure of the worth of this anyway so I want to keep the cost down. So....while I have not painted a bike before, I have all the equipment "and" have recently stayed at a Holliday Inn motel.
note: I haven't received the bike yet. I just won it on eBay.
thanks martin
 

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there is some chance I made all or part of that frame. Some of the frames I made have "EK" as part of their serial number.

Those bikes had Dupont Imron paint, which is a pain to get off. We used a really nasty chemical to remove the paint when we had to repair them. Don't know what to tell you about removing it, there are probably removers for catylized acrylic enamels, don't know how hard they are to get, or how expensive.

I've never tried it, but bead blasting should be ok, sandblasting is ok too if you use care. That frame was probably sandblasted after it was brazed, I think they moved to chemical cleanup around that time though.
 

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Here's a suggestion- find a dumpster frame- any old huffy will do- chemically strip it and practice painting it before you try your real frame.

You might need to paint it and strip it 4 or 5 times before you get the hang of painting small round tubes and getting the paint smooth, thin and even like you want.

But when you get around to your real frame, it'll look good. Practice makes perfect...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
painting tips

Hey thanks (both of you) for the tips on removing the paint. Trying this on an old frame is a good idea. Including painting on the frame to improve my skills. Years ago I sand blasted a frame (or actually had someone do the blasting). I think he was used to doing industrial equipment as he hit it pretty hard and left the surface really rough. It was a Lambert and I ended up snapping the fork on it anyway. (that's another story). so I am pretty leery of sand unless I was doing it myself. We have a bead blaster here where I work and if the frame will fit, I will try that. I'm thinking it might be a bit large though, so I was leaning towards the chemical striping.
martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Really! That's pretty cool. I will check the frame when I get it and let you know if it's some of your handiwork? I will look into removers for Imron also.
martin

unterhausen said:
there is some chance I made all or part of that frame. Some of the frames I made have "EK" as part of their serial number.

Those bikes had Dupont Imron paint, which is a pain to get off. We used a really nasty chemical to remove the paint when we had to repair them. Don't know what to tell you about removing it, there are probably removers for catylized acrylic enamels, don't know how hard they are to get, or how expensive.

I've never tried it, but bead blasting should be ok, sandblasting is ok too if you use care. That frame was probably sandblasted after it was brazed, I think they moved to chemical cleanup around that time though.
 

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martinrjensen said:
It was a Lambert and I ended up snapping the fork on it anyway. (that's another story)martin
Yer sandblasting didn't weaken that fork- Lamberts are known for the "death fork"

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lambert.html

So sandblast to yer heart's content!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
death fork

At the time I didn't know the bike notoriety and the distinguished name of the fork. It was a really nice bike once you got over the fact that it might kill you.
martin

buck-50 said:
Yer sandblasting didn't weaken that fork- Lamberts are known for the "death fork"

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lambert.html

So sandblast to yer heart's content!
 

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I've sandblasted my fair share of frames. In Wisconsin in the winter, sandblasting is something you really, really don't want to do. Trek had a sandblasting cabinet big enough for frames, and if the static built up enough it would zap you on the nose or lips.

I would look up someone that does "media blasting." Anyone that only does sandblasting is probably used to removing concrete stains from brick or something coarse like that. There are also businesses that can remove paint chemically. Imron was made to be resistant to chemicals, so it's hard to get off.
 

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martinrjensen said:
Hey thanks (both of you) for the tips on removing the paint. Trying this on an old frame is a good idea. Including painting on the frame to improve my skills. Years ago I sand blasted a frame (or actually had someone do the blasting). I think he was used to doing industrial equipment as he hit it pretty hard and left the surface really rough. It was a Lambert and I ended up snapping the fork on it anyway. (that's another story). so I am pretty leery of sand unless I was doing it myself. We have a bead blaster here where I work and if the frame will fit, I will try that. I'm thinking it might be a bit large though, so I was leaning towards the chemical striping.
martin
bead or media blast is what you want to strip paint, not sand blasting. Sand can eat through thin walled metal tubes right quick.:blush2:
It can be difficult to get a DIY job looking good, but you can get decent results with proper prep, tecnhique & patience. Lots of info on the net if you want to go this route.
I'd recommend looking for a local powder coater (ask around at the LBS and motorcycle shops & see who they recommend). PC is usually a lot more durable than wet paint.

I've had good results with some local industrial powder coaters who also do lots of moto parts and had a bit of experience with bike frames. Media blasted & basic color he could throw in with other stuff for well under $200. :thumbsup:

ps- chemical stripping is a royal pain & pretty nasty stuff to work with.
 

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I second the powder coating suggestion. It's more chip-resistant than paint and looks great when done by a pro. I found a local shop that cut me a deal because they had some metallic silver left over from -- of all things -- a big job painting store racks for Victoria's Secret. $125 and he threw in clearcoat for free. The other shops wanted $125 for a single coat and $200 for metallic with clear. Before and after pix of my '84 Schwinn Le Tour Luxe in the photo thread, if you're interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
powder coating

So I went to a bike shop today that I pass on my daily ride and asked them about painting. They suggested a guy who powdercoats and I am going to call him tomorrow. They mentioned a really reasonable price ($90 bucks) but I know I know I want to have the lugs painted a different color plus pin stripe on the lug edges so (three colors) would probably be more. All I have to do is to figure out the colors I want (I'm kinda thinking a Claret or Burgundy for the main, then brownish lugs and yellow lug edges) I need three colors that don't wash each other out I'm thinking. The colors are up in the air right now. The bike comes as a basic blue, a little on the nicked up side.
I will post before and after pics when I can. I should be getting it Thursday and the first thing I am planning on doing is to check it out and maybe get it running as is. I think I have to do that so I know what components are good. from the pics it looks like most of them.
martin

wittangamo said:
I second the powder coating suggestion. It's more chip-resistant than paint and looks great when done by a pro. I found a local shop that cut me a deal because they had some metallic silver left over from -- of all things -- a big job painting store racks for Victoria's Secret. $125 and he threw in clearcoat for free. The other shops wanted $125 for a single coat and $200 for metallic with clear. Before and after pix of my '84 Schwinn Le Tour Luxe in the photo thread, if you're interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
wittangamo said:
I second the powder coating suggestion. It's more chip-resistant than paint and looks great when done by a pro. I found a local shop that cut me a deal because they had some metallic silver left over from -- of all things -- a big job painting store racks for Victoria's Secret. $125 and he threw in clearcoat for free. The other shops wanted $125 for a single coat and $200 for metallic with clear. Before and after pix of my '84 Schwinn Le Tour Luxe in the photo thread, if you're interested.
I]Before and after pix of my '84 Schwinn Le Tour Luxe in the photo thread, if you're interested.[/I]
I am interested but I can't find your pics. link?
mj
 

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martinrjensen said:
I]Before and after pix of my '84 Schwinn Le Tour Luxe in the photo thread, if you're interested.[/I]
I am interested but I can't find your pics. link?
mj
This is silver metallic powder with clearcoat. The 25-year-old components shined up with some elbow grease and I paid a pro to reassemble and tune.



 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
clearcoat afterwards?

You clear coated it afterwards huh? Was that for higher gloss? did you use just enamal clearcoat?
BTW that Schwinn looks beautiful. I can't wait to get my bike and dive into it. I expect to get it today around 10 am. It's being delivered to my work location. I am planning on loading it in my car and heading home with it immediately..... a short day at the office

mj

wittangamo said:
This is silver metallic powder with clearcoat. The 25-year-old components shined up with some elbow grease and I paid a pro to reassemble and tune.



 

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martinrjensen said:
You clear coated it afterwards huh? Was that for higher gloss? did you use just enamal clearcoat?
BTW that Schwinn looks beautiful. I can't wait to get my bike and dive into it. I expect to get it today around 10 am. It's being delivered to my work location. I am planning on loading it in my car and heading home with it immediately..... a short day at the office

mj
The clearcoat was also powder. I'm no expert, but I was told it's necessary as a protective layer over metallic powder, not on solid colors. The amount of gloss you get depends on the powder you pick, same as paint.

Congrats on getting a new bike and a short day at the office to enjoy it.

Be sure to share your photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
unterhausen said:
there is some chance I made all or part of that frame. Some of the frames I made have "EK" as part of their serial number.

Those bikes had Dupont Imron paint, which is a pain to get off. We used a really nasty chemical to remove the paint when we had to repair them. Don't know what to tell you about removing it, there are probably removers for catylized acrylic enamels, don't know how hard they are to get, or how expensive.

I've never tried it, but bead blasting should be ok, sandblasting is ok too if you use care. That frame was probably sandblasted after it was brazed, I think they moved to chemical cleanup around that time though.
Hi,
Well your initials are not on this frame. Hope it's still a good one! I am out of town right now but I will be back next week. My frame will be back ffom the powder coaters when I get back too!
martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
wittangamo said:
The clearcoat was also powder. I'm no expert, but I was told it's necessary as a protective layer over metallic powder, not on solid colors. The amount of gloss you get depends on the powder you pick, same as paint.

Congrats on getting a new bike and a short day at the office to enjoy it.

Be sure to share your photos.
Numerous photos of the (almost) finished bike here:
https://s150.photobucket.com/albums/s92/martinrjensen/Trek TX900 bike/

Unfortunately i am still waiting for the Trek decals. They must have gotten lost in the mail and I am going to have another set sent out next week. I changed the stem to a 120mm cinelli and the seatpost to a newer longer one. I also put on slightly newer bars that were 42 mm wide. I wanted to stay with old period correct bars but was unable to find any so I stuck some newer Modelo bars on. They still look good and I really needed the extra width.
 
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