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Team Bovine Paceline
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
B4 you read twice, I have posted this in the Specialized forum also.

I am planning on refinishing my Spec e5 Festina Sworks in a cow motif similar to Treks 5500 cow bike. B4 you all condem me, I am a dedicated member of Team Bovine Paceline. I was told by Specialized that painting would void my warranty and they would not supply me with the proper decal package. My questions are why would repainting void my warranty? Is the blue paint somehow serving a structural role? My only thoughts are possibly compromising the integrity of the frame by paint removal techniques. ie sanding, sandblasting, chemical peels. If anyone has any experience with this please help me to choose the correct process so as not to compromise the structural integrity of my prized steed.

John
 

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Your first two questions should be answered by specialized.
Your last issue should be taken up with your painter. If you're so concerned about integrity of your frame, why trust answers to strangers?
 

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It will void your warranty because...

Specialized can not guarantee how your frame will be stripped, nor can they be certain that you won't just be painting over potential flaws that could later destroy your frame. That's the simple reason. If it is out of their hands, then it's out of their hands....

Russ
 

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BAH! Specialized won't honor your warranty because by repainting the bike you'll have defaced their product. Removing the safety stickers will void the warranty on my Giant TCR1! All BS! Unless you sandblast the paint off the bike there is hardly any way that you can dammage the frame. If $ ani't an issue, take it to a bike painter and have them do it-it'll look great and will be durable. If you plan on doing it yourself look into Dupont Imron paint-it's a bit on the pricey side but is far superior to anything else on the market other than powdercoating.
 

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Team Bovine Paceline
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the reply

So it is the sandblasting that could possibly damage my frame. That is the info I was looking for. Chemical stripping is ok? Or even hand sanding? Do you know of any other techniques to remove the old finish safetly? Appreciate the input.

John
 

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Team Bovine Paceline
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"Your first two questions should be answered by specialized."

Specialized told me it would void my warranty but did not know why.


"Your last issue should be taken up with your painter. If you're so concerned about integrity of your frame, why trust answers to strangers?"

You have no idea how concerned or not I am about the integity of my frame. I do not consider the members of this board strangers, as a matter of fact I have gleaned much knowledge and little BS in the past four years. I know the constituents of this board so well that before I read your post I knew it would not contain any helpful, to the point information for my benefit.

John
 

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No warranty, no concerns

Jwh445 said:
So it is the sandblasting that could possibly damage my frame. That is the info I was looking for. Chemical stripping is ok? Or even hand sanding? Do you know of any other techniques to remove the old finish safetly? Appreciate the input.

John
Hey John,

I believe the concern is that improper paint removal could also remove Al from the frame as well, maybe at a critical portion of the frame. That is a race frame, so there is not a whole lot of material there to begin with. Hand sanding and sand blasting an Aluminum frame would lead to most Manufacturers voiding your warranty, especially on a thin walled Aluminum framed race bike.

That being said, if you want to do it- just go for it. Most frame defects show themselves rather quickly- so the frame is probably fine. Just use someone good like Spectrum to do the work.

Also- you need to get one of those cow saddles to go with it.

Cheers,

Coolhand
 

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hi, I'm Larry
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Don't remove the old finish - paint over it

Tear the frame completely down and wash it with soap and water to remove all grease and grime, dry the frame and then wipe the frame down with a strong solvent like Xylene. You may want to give the frame a light sanding with wet 400-600 grit, & dry.

This will give the old paint plenty of tooth for the new pait to adhear to.

The end result will look better than if you sand blasted or chemically stripped the frame. Yeah you will have a few grams of added weight from the old paint, but why risk the frame with strong chemicals and abrasives.
 

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hrrmmph!

As far as my direction to trust your painter and no one else, I fail to see how you can know at this early point that the advice was of no value.
Second, if Specialized can't tell you why the warranty would be voided, what makes you think anyone's guess must be trustworthy? Far too often people seek answers here that are more easily and accurately answered by the mfg.
 

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ok, here we go...

There are two approaches to repainting a frame; one is to completely remove the existing paint and primer thus stripping the bike down to bare metal. The other is to simply paint over the existing paint. If you choose to take the first route you will be embarking on a longer more costly endeavor that will ultimately result in a finer paintjob. The best way to remove the paint is to have the frame glass-bead/or plastic blasted (similar to sandblasting yet "genteler") by a profesional who knows when to stop. Keep in mind that all final sanding must be done by hand. The bike would then need to be totally degreased (fingerprints...) all blemishes filled in (bondo) and prepped for an etching primer. The etching primer will fuse to the metal and give a stable even surface for the paint to adhere to. The next step is to lay down your first layer. Simply put the best paint out there is DuPont Imron. The best method for applying paint is a paint gun in a spraybooth. the paint is applied in several thin layers, thus building up a solid paint. During the painting process graphics, fades, pearlessence and other effects can be added but this is reccomended only for experienced painters... then comes the clearcoat-same manner as paint.

Ok, after reading all this (abriged) I assume you'll take the more sensible route. If so, clean the bike, sand it with a wet/dry to eliminate the existing clearcoat and rough up the paint surface. Prime it with an etching primer-something designed for overpainting and then procede to paint the bike. Imron is still the best, but spraypaint will work too. The main thing to keep in mind is to go slow, if you notice a blemish or drip, sand it with wet/dry and add another layer. Same thing with clear coat. If you're handy this will all make sense and it'll come naturally. I wouldn't reccomend doing this ona good bike--test it out on a junker for your girlfriend/wife/kid first just so you get to know the process.

run a google search and spend some time on the web researching. I did and found all the info to make repainting my Trek 2200 Aluminum a breeze. (I went with the long route)

Oh DO NOT USE XYLENE!! I use it every day and lemme tell ya you don't want to even think of it-it's VERY toxic.

Most of all keep us posted.

P.S. suggest to Greeg that he create a bike finishing and detailing board where this can all be centralized...
 

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Team Bovine Paceline
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
WOW!!!

Thanks Remington.

My riding partner painted cars for a living for about 10 years. I am sure your advice will aid him in the bike painting process. I will take before and after pictures and post on this thread. Patience though, it may take a little while.

Thanks again

John
 
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