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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of painting it in gold, but I want something flashy, like sparkle gold or pearl gold? Is there such a paint color in a spray can?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I want something similar, but in a darker gold. And upon thinking, I don't want the sparkle flakes as they seem to be not as long lasting as straight up solid color. Gonna check out the local O'Reilly to see what they have
 

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I want something similar, but in a darker gold. And upon thinking, I don't want the sparkle flakes as they seem to be not as long lasting as straight up solid color. Gonna check out the local O'Reilly to see what they have
I strongly recommend using Plasti Dip. Just in case you don't like the outcome you could always rip it off or go with another color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
went to O'reilly and looked at some paint, including plasti dip. I'm not going with plasti dip because it looks rough, not aesthetic when up close. But I ended up going to Home Depot and bought a can of "metallic gold" paint. Bought some white primer. Gonna be spraying soon!

One question. How much should I sand down my fork though? I have sanded off most of the old clear coat, but I don't think I have hit the carbon layer yet because the dust coming off is still white, and I'm assuming it's white because due to a bit of clear coat left? Is that enough sanding? or should I sand it down until some black dust start to come off? I don't want to over sand it, just enough to get the pain to stick
 

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One question. How much should I sand down my fork though? I have sanded off most of the old clear coat, but I don't think I have hit the carbon layer yet because the dust coming off is still white, and I'm assuming it's white because due to a bit of clear coat left? Is that enough sanding? or should I sand it down until some black dust start to come off? I don't want to over sand it, just enough to get the pain to stick
As long as the surface is roughed up, that should be good enough.

Hang the fork when you paint it. Pay special attention to inside curves, which can be hard to get good coverage on.

Use multiple thin coats. Wet sanding between primer and paint will improve results.

You might consider setting the fork in direct sun for a couple of days after painting to cure it fully. Or you can use your oven if you dare, which can give a very good hard finish on enamel (which I assume you are using).

No matter what you do it won't be factory tough, but proper curing will help. And touch ups will be easy since you will have the paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
As long as the surface is roughed up, that should be good enough.

Hang the fork when you paint it. Pay special attention to inside curves, which can be hard to get good coverage on.

Use multiple thin coats. Wet sanding between primer and paint will improve results.

You might consider setting the fork in direct sun for a couple of days after painting to cure it fully. Or you can use your oven if you dare, which can give a very good hard finish on enamel (which I assume you are using).

No matter what you do it won't be factory tough, but proper curing will help. And touch ups will be easy since you will have the paint.
thanks for the tips! This will be a leisurely project so i will take my time. Hopefully it will turn out better than my last painting project!

paint is not enamel, but he clear coat is. Is this enough? On my previous fork, I did this and it turned out ok in terms of resistance to rock chips. The color I want doesn't come in enamel based
 

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Done right, rattle can paint jobs can turn out really nice. I'll add just one point to QuiQuaeQuod's - don't get too close (paint will run) and don't pull back too far (paint will dry before it lands). Read the instructions - most likely 10"

For a factory-look, treat it like the paint on your car... wet sand then polish with a buffer (also multi-step). Definitely a lot of work for a fork. But, as you said - it's a leisurely project. Should be fun.

A rattle can paint job done in the driveway:


Being a Klein, the paint on this bike was amazing from the factory. But 20+ years later, it had dulled a bit. So, I did a 4-stage (cut, swirl, polish, seal) paint "correction" to it using the same tools and chemicals I use on my cars. Admittedly, it was a bit over the top... but it was fun.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Done right, rattle can paint jobs can turn out really nice. I'll add just one point to QuiQuaeQuod's - don't get too close (paint will run) and don't pull back too far (paint will dry before it lands). Read the instructions - most likely 10"

For a factory-look, treat it like the paint on your car... wet sand then polish with a buffer (also multi-step). Definitely a lot of work for a fork. But, as you said - it's a leisurely project. Should be fun.

A rattle can paint job done in the driveway:


Being a Klein, the paint on this bike was amazing from the factory. But 20+ years later, it had dulled a bit. So, I did a 4-stage (cut, swirl, polish, seal) paint "correction" to it using the same tools and chemicals I use on my cars. Admittedly, it was a bit over the top... but it was fun.

damn that's turned out nicely.

on my previous fork, I sprayed to close and got a few run offs on both the paint and the clear coat, I did this thinking to make things go faster and I wanted that "wet look". Well, I got the wet look alright, but too many runs. This time hopefully i'll learn better
 

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Do take your time, what your described in regards to sanding is fine. All you need is a rough surface for the paint to adhere/bond to.

After the primer coat, lightly wet sand, wipe down and air dry. In between each coat wet sand the surface lightly... keep repeating this process until you reached the desired number of coats. each coat should be completely dry before re-coating, read the instructions on the can.

Before you apply the clear coat be sure all paint is dry and hardened, can take up to 2 weeks depending on the brand of and type of paint... so again read the cans instructions... both the paint and clear-coat.

Have fun with it and post picture when your done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Do take your time, what your described in regards to sanding is fine. All you need is a rough surface for the paint to adhere/bond to.

After the primer coat, lightly wet sand, wipe down and air dry. In between each coat wet sand the surface lightly... keep repeating this process until you reached the desired number of coats. each coat should be completely dry before re-coating, read the instructions on the can.

Before you apply the clear coat be sure all paint is dry and hardened, can take up to 2 weeks depending on the brand of and type of paint... so again read the cans instructions... both the paint and clear-coat.

Have fun with it and post picture when your done.
the instructions on the can say that i can wait 10-15 min before applying another coat of paint. And after 10-15 window, then I must wait 24 hr before i can recoat. However, last time I did this and waited 10-15 minutes before applying each of the some 3-4 coats, I got the runs. Maybe I was painting closer than the 8-10 inches distance? But this time i'll keep this in mind.
 

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May I suggest....

I've had great luck with rattle can paint jobs.

http://wp.me/p10hh2-m0

http://wp.me/p10hh2-fo

The way that I would attack re-painting a carbon fork would be to -

- sand the clear coat or paint on the fork enough to dull the sheen and remove stickers, decals, etc.

- mask off the for crown where the headset sits. Also plug the hole in the crown for the brake caliper, etc.

- prime it with a good high-build primer. SEM works well.

- block sand it lightly with 800 wet/dry to remove the orange peel and level out any dings, etc. I use a pin-hole or "spot" putty to handle bigger dings.

- Check out Roth Metal Flake - great paint. I've used it a lot. Killer Kolor. It is an automotive grade urethane. Sprays nice and, basically, I've never had to color sand it.

Rattle Bombs - Lil' Daddy Roth Metal Flake

- shoot a "tack" coat with your color. The aim here isn't coverage, but to lightly mist the fork with paint that, after it "flashes" (i.e. the solvent evaporates), gives you a surface where the paint is less likely to drip or run.

- start shooting light color coats. Give it a couple of minutes between coats. First coat should give you 70 or 80% coverage. Go light on the paint until you get the color that you want. Here's how pro's do it with rattle cans...

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- let dry a couple of days, minimum. A week is good. Sticking it in the sun is a good trick. I would be leery of putting a carbon fork in an oven. Just me.

- wet sand with 1000 wet/dry paper. Be careful not to burn through the paint. I use mineral spirits to clean off the residue. It will look like sh!t. Don't worry.

- clear coat. Use a compatible paint. I would NOT put an enamel clear coat over something that I wasn't 100% sure was compatible with the paint that you are top-coating. If you use Rustoleum, for example, I would shoot it with Rustoleum clear. Ditto if you use Duplicolor from O'Reilley - they have a clear that works with their paints. The absolute best clear in a rattle can that is out there is this stuff.

Spray Max 2K Clear - Lil' Daddy Roth Metal Flake

Be warned - you really need to read and heed the health warnings.

- let it dry. A couple of days at least. A week is great.

- Hit it again with 1000 wet/dry. This time I would finish it with some Meguires polishing compound.

- Enjoy your handiwork.
 

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I'd add a cautionary note. Most of the guys advising you here did their work on steel. If you're doing a carbon fork, remember that it's essentially plastic. It's best to use paint that's formulated for plastic. When I recently did my carbon bike, I painted it with special plastic paint, then top-coated with spar polyurethane varnish (polyurethane is plastic.) Same with the fork except I left it natural carbon (I had to repair the fork, so that's my carbon work showing.)
 
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