Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Steaming piles of opinion
Joined
·
10,503 Posts
Xanlact said:
Any suggestions out there on a good, comprehensive repair books? I'm a tinkerer. :)
Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance is good, as is the Park Tool book.

Someone will help me with the shop bible of everything - starts with a B - but that's probably overkill.

FWIW, the Park Tool website and Sheldonbrown.com have a ton of information for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
First I would suggest you use online sources like the help pages on Park Tool's website or Sheldon Brown's website (a lot to sift through though).

If you want hard-copy, then my list for you would start with Leonard Zinn's books; "Zinn and the Art of Road (or MT, or TT) bike Maintenance" as a great starter, followed by Park Tool's "Big Blue Book" for more depth, and end the list with the Barnett's Manual as probably the most comprehensive.

Bob
 

·
Le Misérable
Joined
·
4,374 Posts
Between Zinn's book and Sheldon Brown's website, I've never had to look anywhere else. I'm a hands-on kind of person and really like having something to carry around, but every now and then there's something that isn't quite crystal clear in Zinn and I go online and ask Sheldon.

Also, there are SO many interesting and provocative articles on Sheldon's site that it's just a great place for a rider to waste time:).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
If you like to see what you're reading, the Bicycle Tutor has a slew of videos showing how it's done start to finish. Alex Ramon is the guy behind it all, and he's been all over news shows in Canada:

http://bicycletutor.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
The internet and forums like this where you can ask others for help if you get stuck is better than any book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
As long as you stay with accepted sites like Park Tool and Sheldon Brown, or are taking advice from someone with a brain that, for instance, isn't telling you to remove your headset with a screwdriver, I'd agree that the internet is a great place for repair help. But just like any advice you look for on the 'net; you have to clear away the garbage before you find good advice.

Admittedly, there are alternate methods to perform some functions, but those aren't the best techniques for a newby to learn how to repair their bike with. It creates a situation of lowered standards. In some cases those lower standards can be acceptable to the rider, but in others they are downright dangerous. And as many people on these forums will attest (customers and qualified wrenches alike), there's too much of that going on as it is, even at shops.

Also, some people learn and work better with a hard copy in front of them rather than looking at their computer screen. Plus, I haven't found any website that is as comprehensive as the Barnett's manual, especially for component-specific information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Indyfan said:
Also, some people learn and work better with a hard copy in front of them rather than looking at their computer screen. Plus, I haven't found any website that is as comprehensive as the Barnett's manual, especially for component-specific information.
Your whole post was thoughtful and well-worded. :thumbsup:

On your last point ... that's a cool thing about the Park Tool book: it's basically a printed version OF their wonderful website.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,636 Posts
Hey!

Indyfan said:
As long as you stay with accepted sites like Park Tool and Sheldon Brown, or are taking advice from someone with a brain that, for instance, isn't telling you to remove your headset with a screwdriver.
OK, so I've removed dozens of headsets with a screwdriver and a hammer with no damage to bikes or headset cups. Is there something you want to say to me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
For some reason I knew somebody would take it wrong, no matter how hard I tried to word it.

Kerry: First, you obviously have the mechanical skills to to perform that task without damaging the frames or headsets of those bicycles. Second, read the second paragraph of my post. Especially the second part of the first sentence.

In the posts I've read by you in the past you haven't come off like the people I'm pointing the "brainless" comment to. Those are the folks who will go out of their way to avoid the proper techniques just for of some bizarre, spiteful notion they have in their heads. Maybe some kind of nonconformist ideals? They typically hang out (or used to) on the MTBR side. I don't bother going there any more.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top