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Moderatus Puisne
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't have one yet, but I've got to buy one. Home use, don't really care about portability, but can't be huge.

I'm most concerned about damaging aluminum tubes with a clamp-style stand, as I probably don't have enough exposed seapost to clamp to. With <a href=http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1227&brand=&sku=2677&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=>this style</a>, is it a serious risk?

how about <a href=http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1227&brand=&sku=16084&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=>these?</a> Any disadvantages to this style?

Finally, are <a href=http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1227&brand=&sku=6652&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=>these</a> absolute junk to be avoided, or would it be stable enough to actually work on a bike?

Thanks!
 

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If your price range extends to the upper level Park stands, take a look at the Ultimate Pro repair stands. In my opinion, they are the best - portable or no - repair stands on the market. The clamping mechanism more or less prevents overclamping on thin walled tubing.
 

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I never clamp one of my tubes in a stand.... I'm just unlucky enough to have that be a disaster. I also don't want to trash my post when doing something that requires a lot of torque on the frame.

I went to my LBS and asked for the cheapest, heaviest, and ugliest post that they had on hand. For $10 I got a nice no-name aluminum post that probably weighs more than the frame. If I'm doing anything other than cleaning the bike I pop my post out and use the el-cheapo to hold the bike in the stand.

I use the Ultimate Pro stand and am extremely happy with it.
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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I have one of the Park PRS 20 stands (the one that holds the bike up from the bottom). I like it a lot--it's stable and quite sturdily built. I like being able to spin the bike around, too (something you can't do with the Minoura you showed). It holds the bike very nicely--I can grink down a bottom bracket properly without the bike wanting to shift. Easy-on, easy-off the stand too.

The downsides: You have to take at least one wheel off to mount the bike on the stand. This isn't much of an issue to me, but it's something. There's a knob on the bolt that locks the long arm in position, and that gets in the way of the cranks, depending on which side you put it on. You can put it on either side, so it's not a big thing, and you can also simply replace it with a same-size bolt and the problem goes away entirely.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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3,806 Posts
Prs 20

bikeboy389 said:
I have one of the Park PRS 20 stands (the one that holds the bike up from the bottom). I like it a lot--it's stable and quite sturdily built...
Great stand for home use in a crowded basement. Just used it stripping off old components from my wifes frame and then building the frame up from scratch. Then only trouble spot is that the handlebars sit a bit high for wrapping bar tape. My son uses it all the time when cleaning our bikes. Very versatile stand for multiple bikes with no concerns about damage.

bikeboy389 said:
The downsides: ...There's a knob on the bolt that locks the long arm in position, and that gets in the way of the cranks...you can also simply replace it with a same-size bolt and the problem goes away entirely.
I use a set screw instead of the knob. I find Park's response kind of funny since if you are working on the bike you would have hand tools nearby.

Park_Tool said:
Steve,
Thank you for the feedback. A set screw would allow you to work with
the bike either way, as you state. We did not do this because we felt
most people would not want to use a hand tool to fold the stand up. If
you leave the stand up it is of course not an issue. Look for a 3/8
inch set screw to replace the knob. A hex wrench for this size will be
SAE sizing (fraction, not metric).

C. J.
Park Tool
 

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I've got the Pedros stand, very stable, strong and easy to use. The clamp is easy to use and almost impossible to damage the tube.


<img alt="" src="http://store1.yimg.com/I/pedrosusa_1862_4531135"
style="width: 211px; height: 400px;">
 

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I've had the PCS1 for about 7 years now. Never had an issue with damaging anything on the frame, but I also have plenty of seat post exposed. On my wife's bikes, I just tape off the mark where it sits normally, and raise the seat post up far enough to work on the bike. It's a little more challenging now with her tri bike and the aero seat post, but it still works like a charm.
 

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I heart team Zissou!
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T3075 CycleMotion

T3075 CycleMotion -- This stand, my friend, is the bomb! Stable as all get-out, and if you aren't looking to travel w/ it, this beats all of Park's offerings on a price/performance basis. I'm pretty sure a few places in the States sell it (Lickbike.com?)

anyway, for 85€, this stand has made me a very happy camper.

A+

Philippe

(Pinarello not included...)
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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As for the first style - When I was last shopping for a bike, I came across a brand new Specialized Sequoia that had it's top tube cloverleafed by the shop hacks assembling it. Don't know how it got to the floor that way, but the point is they do it every day and screw it up sometimes. Sure, it was probably a newbie not paying attention and all, but there is obviously a risk. Depending on the bike design, it may not matter if you can't clamp to the seat post - that means that it's filling the seat tube, so you can clamp to it without fear of crushing anything. Another minor point - clamping by the seat post or tube isn't the most balanced of positions. Not enough to matter much, but it's not as stable as it might otherwise be.

Second style - I love my PRS-20. Everything that has been said is accurate, I have very few downsides to this design. The biggest one that comes to mind is it's not the best for cleaning a very dirty bike, since it's a little tougher to get to the underside of the BB - probably the dirtiest place on a bike. That's a completely trivial complaint.

The last style - I have no experience with. Looks OK for tune-ups and cleaning, but any 'real' work you'd want something more stable and adjustable.
 
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