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Pedal the crank and the chain will go to the smallest cog. Then just take the slack out of the cable and tighten down the bolt. You may need to fine tune the cable tension after that. Go to the Park Tool website to see a very good explanation.
 

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I just replaced my rear dérailleur cable. I have a 9-speed triple mountain bike with Deore DX components.

I would like to know what chain rings I should have the chain on when I first screw the cable to the rear dérailleur arm. Should I pull the new cable very tight?

Thanks
 

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kidd546 said:
Pedal the crank and the chain will go to the smallest cog. Then just take the slack out of the cable and tighten down the bolt. You may need to fine tune the cable tension after that. Go to the Park Tool website to see a very good explanation.
Thanks .... I've looked at multiple how to's for this sort of thing and they "always" start with fine tuning the cable and neglect to start with what you just told me. Awesome.

Thanks again,
Rob :)
 

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Be prepared for the cable to lose it's tension during your first 10 or so miles. This is pretty normal I've found. So carry an hex-wrench in the size of the cable anchor-bolt (4mm or 5mm) and a pair of pliers. Pull it taut and screw down the bolt. If at all possible, use a beam torque-wrench and torque it to 60 inch-pounds. The cable will get the idea it's home after that and stay put - most likely. This goes for both the rear and the front derailleur.

Hey Forum-Admins - April Fools is all fine & well. Would you now please restore this place to it's usual mathematical sequencing?

Thank You.
 

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Puchnuts said:
Be prepared for the cable to lose it's tension during your first 10 or so miles. This is pretty normal I've found. So carry an hex-wrench in the size of the cable anchor-bolt (4mm or 5mm) and a pair of pliers. Pull it taut and screw down the bolt. If at all possible, use a beam torque-wrench and torque it to 60 inch-pounds. The cable will get the idea it's home after that and stay put - most likely. This goes for both the rear and the front derailleur.

Hey Forum-Admins - April Fools is all fine & well. Would you now please restore this place to it's usual mathematical sequencing?

Thank You.
Thanks ... I will do that.

I guess then that there is no worry about having the cable too tight?
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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a torque wrench for cable anchor bolts? that's a bit extreme. when you first install the cable and anchor it, hold the derialleur body in your hand and push the shifter thru a couple of clicks, no more than 2, or you'll possibly damage the shifter. do this a few times to compress the housing, and stretch the cable. loosen and re-attach the cable, finger tight for cable tension is good. check the adjustment of the shifting, and you're done. this way you're pre-broken in the cable/housing and your first/second rides won't be crap because you had to adjust your derailleur while riding. if derailleur cable/housing replacement is done correctly, there should be no need for first-ride re-adjustment.
 

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60 inch-pounds on a cable anchor-bolt is maximum. Hence the torque-wrench so you don't go beyond this mark. Otherwise you may strip the bolt. Then you'll be kicking yourself instead of riding your bike.
 

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Puchnuts said:
60 inch-pounds on a cable anchor-bolt is maximum. Hence the torque-wrench so you don't go beyond this mark. Otherwise you may strip the bolt. Then you'll be kicking yourself instead of riding your bike.
Orrrrr, you could just use a proper sized allen wrench and a little common sense. You'll never get a good torque reading because you'd have to hold the derailleur body still with your other hand.

Double check cxwrench's signature line before you tell him how to wrench.
 

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I don't need two hands to tighten a bolt. And, as far as I'm concerned, every budding bike-wrench out there should use a torque-wrench while they are starting out. This way they can develop "common sense" - or a 'feel' for what various different inch-pounds feel like. Also, as the calendar marches on, more and more components appear with exacting torque instructions. Maybe part of this is legalese boiler-plate, but at least some of it is written as a result of product-testing by the manufacturer.*

And I am sure that some higher quality bike-shops do use the torque instructions - and expect their 'wrenches' to do likewise.

I hope the OP takes all this into consideration as it's a good education that may, someday, mean the difference of getting a job - and not. I picked up a custom wheel earlier this year from a LBS I farmed out the build to. I was called out of town and needed it done. Now that was an example of a shop that had never heard of using a commonly available tool. Aside from the wheel - it was a rear - being way out of both lateral and vertical true, such that it spun like a potato chip on a roller-coaster, and not being dished - the clown who built it didn't use a tension-meter on the spokes. Well I do - and the drive-side weighed in at over 200Kgf! Fully half of the nipples had been rounded off. Leaving the only solution being to cut the spokes out of the wheel. I had the damage repaired by the owner - who was speechless.

So I advise getting quality measuring devices and learning how to use them.


* - Cynicism meets cynicism? :D
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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Puchnuts said:
I don't need two hands to tighten a bolt. And, as far as I'm concerned, every budding bike-wrench out there should use a torque-wrench while they are starting out. This way they can develop "common sense" - or a 'feel' for what various different inch-pounds feel like. Also, as the calendar marches on, more and more components appear with exacting torque instructions. Maybe part of this is legalese boiler-plate, but at least some of it is written as a result of product-testing by the manufacturer.*

And I am sure that some higher quality bike-shops do use the torque instructions - and expect their 'wrenches' to do likewise.

I hope the OP takes all this into consideration as it's a good education that may, someday, mean the difference of getting a job - and not. I picked up a custom wheel earlier this year from a LBS I farmed out the build to. I was called out of town and needed it done. Now that was an example of a shop that had never heard of using a commonly available tool. Aside from the wheel - it was a rear - being way out of both lateral and vertical true, such that it spun like a potato chip on a roller-coaster, and not being dished - the clown who built it didn't use a tension-meter on the spokes. Well I do - and the drive-side weighed in at over 200Kgf! Fully half of the nipples had been rounded off. Leaving the only solution being to cut the spokes out of the wheel. I had the damage repaired by the owner - who was speechless.

So I advise getting quality measuring devices and learning how to use them.


* - Cynicism meets cynicism? :D

holy crap! what a nightmare that must have been...i'll bet(hope is more like it) the owner let that 'mechanic' have it when he was done rebuilding your wheel! it's weird, especially w/ regards to wheels, but i know a fair number of very experienced wheel builders that don't use tension meters. they'll put a torque wrench on most bolts, but they 'go by feel' w/ wheels. i always use the tension meter, it just seems dumb not to. i torque stem bolts, binder bolts, bb's, crank arms...stuff like that, but never have used the torque wrench on cable clamp bolts. i've never actually seen anyone do that...not that it's a bad idea, just seems like overkill. in over 15 yrs of pro wrenching, i've never stripped one.

yet...:thumbsup:
 

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I don't know about all this torque wrench talk ... but I must say that I really need to get a bike repair stand. Hanging my bike off a ladder with a dog leash no substitute :)
 

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Puchnuts said:
Be prepared for the cable to lose it's tension during your first 10 or so miles. This is pretty normal I've found. So carry an hex-wrench in the size of the cable anchor-bolt (4mm or 5mm) and a pair of pliers. Pull it taut and screw down the bolt. If at all possible, use a beam torque-wrench and torque it to 60 inch-pounds.
Or - he could just turn the barrel adjuster 1/4 turn. :wink:
 

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cxwrench said:
holy crap! what a nightmare that must have been...i'll bet(hope is more like it) the owner let that 'mechanic' have it when he was done rebuilding your wheel! it's weird, especially w/ regards to wheels, but i know a fair number of very experienced wheel builders that don't use tension meters. they'll put a torque wrench on most bolts, but they 'go by feel' w/ wheels. i always use the tension meter, it just seems dumb not to. i torque stem bolts, binder bolts, bb's, crank arms...stuff like that, but never have used the torque wrench on cable clamp bolts. i've never actually seen anyone do that...not that it's a bad idea, just seems like overkill. in over 15 yrs of pro wrenching, i've never stripped one.

yet...:thumbsup:
I never used a tension-meter for spokes when I was building either - until a little while back. The FSA is the best one out there - designed by Jobst Brandt. And armed with one, I went exploring people's wheels that were built before the cheap Park Tool TM-1 hit the market.

Most of the wheels I came across were at or above 130Kgf - whereas the rims was specified for 70 - 110Kgf in most instances. These were old wheels that had been rolling fine for years - at or above 130Kgf. And, I found, I usually build to 130Kgf. So my decision? I build very good wheels to less than .25mm lateral true and under .5mm vertical true. Never heard of one failing. So...I'll keep going for the 130Kgf wheels I'm accustomed to. I think that Park tension-meter will/is causing people needless distress.

Regards the cable anchor-bolts: It's not that people are going to strip them. It's that people are under-torquing them. 60 i.p. is quite a bit of torque. But without tightening the anchor-bolts sufficiently, the cables will keep coming loose and people will end up frustrated at whatever target they perceive to be responsible. While finding the '60' sweet-spot will keep the cables where they belong.

Happy Trails!
 

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Back again ... My bike is shifting fine now, but after taking the shift cables off and putting on again, when I down shift in front it shifts from the biggest gear all the way down to the smallest skipping the middle chain ring. I cannot remember it doing that before I messed with the bike :)

It shifts up through all three rings fine. Does anybody know if this should be happening or not.? The bike I am working on is a mountain bike with Deore DX.
 

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Starting over

stringer said:
Back again ... My bike is shifting fine now, but after taking the shift cables off and putting on again, when I down shift in front it shifts from the biggest gear all the way down to the smallest skipping the middle chain ring. I cannot remember it doing that before I messed with the bike :)

It shifts up through all three rings fine. Does anybody know if this should be happening or not.? The bike I am working on is a mountain bike with Deore DX.
You're having standard adjustment problems. Go to the Park Tool web site and follow the directions for setting up a front derailleur from scratch.
 

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Kerry Irons

Park Tools instructions are what I primarily used. I think that I might have the inner shift cable too tight causing the shift cage to move too quickly?

I am not sure as Park Tool's guide does not seem to talk much about cable tension and how to adjust this accurately or how having improper cable tension may effect shifting. I will try playing with this. I already have to replace the cable as a couple of the strands broke when I initially put the cable on improperly.
 
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