Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I guess I'm not "technically" a beginner, but I've never really dived into the sport, rather just used my bike as a way to get here/there, and loose a few pounds doing it. The problem is, I've really come to enjoy my time biking!

I was given a Giant Perigee road bike about 18 years ago. Since it was free, I certainly didn't do any wish list comparisons! Well, I've used it to go to/from work (11 miles each way), and the occasional ride of my days off...then the little stuff with the kids. This year, I rode it into work for the first time of the season, and it wasn't shifting all that great - add to that the weather, and I took it straight to the LBS for a tune-up. Yeah, observant me - the frame was OBVIOUSLY bent...and quite unsafe. So that bike is now toast!

Unfortunately, due to braces for my youngest, and 1st year of college for the oldest, my budget is below zero. I've looked around Craigslist for the best I can get around here. I've found a few hybrid bikes, but I'm not certain I want to go there. I really liked the road bike. But, I am sure I could come around, if it was best. I also found a Cannondale R-700, used. It is listed as a "Tri-bike", but I am questioning if it is really a tri bike, or if it just has the arms added to a road bike.

Can anyone answer that?

I'm looking at these:

http://rmn.craigslist.org/bik/3787080521.html
http://rmn.craigslist.org/bik/3797585849.html
http://lacrosse.craigslist.org/bik/3815880931.html

I could use the help. I'm 5'7", but a hefty 215 lbs. (I did read that the Cannondale does a good job with "heavy" people...)

Thanks!

Gary
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
If you've had a drop bar road bike and liked riding it, you may not be happy with a hybrid, so beware of settling only to find yourself looking for another bike sooner rather than later.

Try LBS's for used offerings along with bike coops, community news and even postings at entrances to stores. It'll take some time and patience, but given the price ranges of the CL bikes you linked to, you'll eventually find something.

BTW, speaking of those CL bikes, at 5'7", just guessing, but odds are the C'dale would be too big for you.

Lastly, you may want to consider having your Giant straightened. That's the beauty of steel, more easily repairable. This, of course, assumes that it's repairable and that's the only problem with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,381 Posts
Yep! That's right PJ!

That's one of the most beautiful aspects about steel bikes. They're made of steel tubing. You find the right tubing that's compatible with the others, and you've got half the solution nicked. Just pay a qualified welder to put 'em together, and VIOLA!....You're back in business!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you've had a drop bar road bike and liked riding it, you may not be happy with a hybrid, so beware of settling only to find yourself looking for another bike sooner rather than later.


It seems I've got my search down to two choices...an El cheapo road bike, and a hybrid. Can I get your opinions on the bikes...obviously different platforms, but, if I need to dismiss one of them out of hand, it will leave the other to fall back on!

7.1 FX - Trek Bicycle#

Schwinn Fastback Sport Road Bike (Sport Alu) - Giantnerd®

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Remember, I'm just trying to "bridge the gap" until I can afford a quality road bike. I'm leaning twords the Trek, because I know that if I have a road bike (poor quality it may be), I will put off a new purchase longer than I would otherwise!

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,713 Posts
No opinion on those specific bikes, but it seems to me that if what you want to do is ride a road bike, it doesn't make sense to buy a hybrid. Even if you can't afford your dream road bike now (who can?), you'll be happier on a road bike of some sort. And if that makes you delay upgrading, so what? Maybe that means that "poor quality" road bike is better than you think, and good enough for longer than you thought. Actually, you might be quite pleasantly surprised by it.

I really liked the road bike.
That's the key sentence in your first post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,381 Posts
I say, get some cross lever brakes for that Schwinn Fastback and don't even think about getting another road bike until that Fastback falls apart! Hopefully, by then you would have save enough cash to get a Raleigh Record Ace, or something! :D
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
For the reasons I (and others) mentioned, I'd lean towards the Schwinn. But my concerns are 1) you can't test ride it beforehand and 2) you'll get no sizing/ fitting assistance. This, of course, assumes mail order.

If correct, you might want to at least measure the top tube on the Giant (we can tell you how) and compare it to the sizing chart of the Schwinn. Another assumption here.. that the Giant fits you fairly well.

The above method isn't the best, but in lieu of a standard LBS fitting is better than winging it on sizing. Once you get the bike, consider opting for a standard fitting. I think it'll add to your enjoyment, and quite possibly keep you on this particular bike a little longer. Not a bad thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, it's been a while I know. I've been lurking on Craigslist for a trek fx. I now have two choices: a new 7.2 fx, or a used 2010 7.6 fx. Both are about the same price, minus a free tune-up for the local bike shop 7.2, and possibly a tuneup expense for the 7.6.

One concern is I have a bit of gravel to deal with to get to the county road. Are the 7.6 tires going to be ok with that?

Any other thoughts?
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Ok, it's been a while I know. I've been lurking on Craigslist for a trek fx. I now have two choices: a new 7.2 fx, or a used 2010 7.6 fx. Both are about the same price, minus a free tune-up for the local bike shop 7.2, and possibly a tuneup expense for the 7.6.

One concern is I have a bit of gravel to deal with to get to the county road. Are the 7.6 tires going to be ok with that?

Any other thoughts?
According to Bikepedia, the 2010 is OE'd with 28c tires. The Trek site lists the 2013 specs as 35c's. Obviously, 35c's are better for light off roading, but I'd bet you could install at least 32c's on the 2010, so don't let tires size determine your decision. Fit and overall condition trumps that, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I dove in for the 7.6. wow, what a deal - I'm wondering if it was even rode for 10 miles! I had it tuned up at the local bike store, and the owner's assembly work. It's in great condition, and begging to be ridden to work on Tuesday. My question for you experts today is: How do I know I am positioned correctly on the bike? ie: when my crank shaft is parallel to the ground, where should my knee be in relation? Should it be over the center of the pedal? Or should it be somewhere else? Thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,234 Posts
There's a bit of cycling lore about that, but I disagree with it.

Here's my simplistic test: If my saddle's height is correct, when I put my pedals at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock and lift my butt off the saddle, I don't have to move fore or aft much, or at all. That lets me know that I was centered over the pedals all along. I suspect my little test could be skewed by having the handlebars in a really wrong place. The test for that is whether or not I can take my hands off the bars without making a big change in position. Basically - can I let go of them but still encircle them with my fingers? If I have to make a big change in position to do that, the handlebars are in the wrong place, and I'll move them to where I can comfortably put my hands.

Here's an article I like.
How to Fit a Bicycle
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
How do I know I am positioned correctly on the bike? ie: when my crank shaft is parallel to the ground, where should my knee be in relation? Should it be over the center of the pedal? Or should it be somewhere else? Thanks...
The following goes on the assumption that the bike is sized correctly for you, because if it isn't, depending on just how far off sizing is, you may not be able to get a 'correct position' on it.

That said, with saddle height correctly set, pedals positioned at 3 and 9, drop a weighted string from the front/ base of your kneecap through the pedal spindle. Use the diagram below for reference.

IME, for most recreational riders, the string should fall slightly behind the pedal spindle as a starting point, adjusting fore/ aft from there - in small increments and slowly (adjust, test ride, repeat...)
View attachment 284141
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top