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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i picked up a $15 fuji sport10 and restored it...when all is said and done, i think i will have put about $100 into restoring it, with new saddle and seatpost, pedals, tires, and possibly bar grip. my question is, would i be able to sell it and at least recover my costs? i'm not thinking i'll make much profit, but would i be able to get $150 or so out of it? frame is in great shape, the aluminum is a little oxidized, and the rims aren't exactly shiny, which is a problem i can fix with a little elbow grease. the consensus on mtbr is that this bike basically isn't even worth dumping the money required to fix it, let alone dumping enough money to turn a little profit on craigslist or ebay. i know there's gotta be a few boomers out there who'd be interested in buying the bike they rode through college, but is it worth my time to find those guys?
 

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finding value of your bike

I personally think it would have to be a really desirable Fugi to get $150.00. Maybe though, It'll be close I think.
A really good way to find the value of this bike is to check out the completed auctions on eBay for similar bikes.
You do have to remember a couple things about "value". An item is "worth" what ever someone will give you for it, when you want to sell it. What that means is that the value may change especially on a seasonal piece of equipment like a bike.
This of course means that if you buy a bike for $50.00 and put $150.00 into it, but it only goes for $50.00 on eBay, that means that it's worth $50.00 at that time on eBay. there are other markets but eBay has to be one of the most sure fire ones out there, that and craigslist. I think eBay wil bring a higher price to you because people will be bidding against themselves, if you let something go to auction it almost always will sell, as opposed to putting it in a consignment shop too. Somebody might want to get $500.00 bucks for that bike and maybe if they hang on to it for a year with ads every week, someone will finally offer them the price but it's gonna thake a while. so it's kind of time dependant too.
I rebuilt a 78 Trek TX900 and I bet I got $800.00 bucks into it. I really don't think I could get that for it but I am not wanting to sell it. It's awesome to look at and rides great, so it's all what you want to do but it can't hurt to know up front.
Hope I didn't get too much off track here.
So, check out eBay, check out Craigslist to see what's selling right now too.

old_fuji said:
i picked up a $15 fuji sport10 and restored it...when all is said and done, i think i will have put about $100 into restoring it, with new saddle and seatpost, pedals, tires, and possibly bar grip. my question is, would i be able to sell it and at least recover my costs? i'm not thinking i'll make much profit, but would i be able to get $150 or so out of it? frame is in great shape, the aluminum is a little oxidized, and the rims aren't exactly shiny, which is a problem i can fix with a little elbow grease. the consensus on mtbr is that this bike basically isn't even worth dumping the money required to fix it, let alone dumping enough money to turn a little profit on craigslist or ebay. i know there's gotta be a few boomers out there who'd be interested in buying the bike they rode through college, but is it worth my time to find those guys?
 

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I agree.
That frame was made of straight-gauge tubing. High-end frames of the era are most always made of some sort of double-butted tubing to cut down weight and increase the responsiveness of the ride. Then there are those in the mid-range with the main part of the frame in butted tube and the rear triangle made of straight gauge. Asian frames are undervalued at the time - even the high end ones. European frames bring a premium even when lower to mid-range. Not that there aren't nice low-end bikes and those willing to buy them but most willing to spend decent money on a vintage bike are educated as to the desirability of the frame. The frame tends to be what powers the value. High-end components usually follow as you wouldn't often find low-end parts on a high-end frame, etc.
A bike might stay worth $15 unless you research it ahead of time. The best way is to be informed ahead of time with a general knowledge of vintage frames. You don't even need to know what the frame is made of. Construction techniques are a giveaway 99% of the time - forged dropouts, chrome stays and forks, lug style, seat stay caps(not blunt and crudely rounded), etc. And, as mentioned above, components might hint to a frame's initial value.
If profit is your motive, I would buy such a bike(no time to research) and sell it after cleaning it up. You will see less overall but since you spent less your profit is higher.
Still not a bad find.
JMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i figured i had 2 roads i could take when i bought the bike:
fix it up and make it ridable, or fix it up and sell it. and, it seems i've taken quite a liking to the bike, so i guess i'm gonna keep it
 

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Fuji Sports were as common as dirt in their day, and rarely sold for more than $200 even when new. Putting a lot of time and money into a restoration of one of these would be like doing a show-car restoration on a 1980 Chevy Chevette. When finished, it would still be a cheap car.
 

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If you want to flip bike on the side. You need to know what has potential and whats not. For Fuji, look for mid 80s America, Touring Series, Team and above models. $150 sounds high for a low end Fuji Sport, but depends on where you are located. You never know though, post it on CL and see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i did find a local buyer...i showed him a price list of all the parts i replaced, and he's paying a few bucks more than that total.

without a road bike, am i still allowed to poast here?
 

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I paid $65.00 for a bridgestone in 2006 in NYC. Ended up costing me $400 more by the time I was done getting the bike right (the way I wanted it). Still got it with me.
 
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