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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend Clark at Hearns Bikes has an old steel bike I've been looking at for several months and almost pulled the trigger on more than once. It's been repainted and has no decals and no indication of the maker. It's got the fancy Nervex lugs and set up with mostly Nuovo Record components except for the crank (TA triple) and wheels (Superbe).
The feller who traded the bike in stated that it was made by a Reynolds man but we don't really know who that is. The frame is very nicely done and the paint job is pristine.

The bike is really old school including downtube shifters, but I'm comfortable with that.

I'm thinking of trading my new hybrid aluminum bike along with some cash to do the deal.

Anyone ever heard of a ?? Reynold frame?
 

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naranjito
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I've never heard of reynolds as a maker of frames. What the guy probably means is that it's made from reynolds tubes.
 

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Seat post size? 27.2 and at least you can pretty much narrow it down to Reynolds or Columbus. Nervex lugs kind of steer me to thinking Reynolds. Pics?
 

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Decrepit Member
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Sometimes it's possible to figure out who the builder is from details on the frame.

Close-up photos of the head tube lugs, the seat cluster, the bottom bracket area, the seat stay bridge, the fork crown and dropouts, what kind of threading the BB shell has, width of BB shell, etc., might provide clues.

Since it's mostly Nuovo Record, it is probably a decent frame. A seatpost that's 27.2mm or larger and forged (rather than stamped) dropouts are indications that it's not entry level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Clark says the maker is allegedly a TEW Reynolds. The dropouts are forged, the seat stays wrap around the cluster, the cables are routed above the bottom bracket with those little brazed on guides like the old Masi. It looks to be at least 70s, maybe a little newer. The water bottle bosses are brazed in. The paint job is really a good job, if a little green.

The bike has one of those TA cranks with the little granny gear and the other two appear to be a 50 & 45 or thereabouts. The rear cluster is rather close ratio. The # 1 & 2 chainrings and cluster make it like a racing bike, and the granny makes the bike usable in the mountains.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't get this bike off my mind. The LBS let me take the bike home overnight and do my afternoon ride with it. Things were really sweet until about a mile down the road when the rear tire flatted. After changing the tube and pumping up the tire with old frame Silca pump (it works really good) I started off again. I then discovered that the thing doesn't shift right at all, with the front derailleur throwing the chain clean off the small chainwheel and the chain "skating" on the number two cog in back. The rear derailleur cage also brushes the rear wheel spokes while on the inner cog. I'm going to take it back tomorrow and see if Clark can't make this thing right.

The ride on this frame is heavenly. If the drivetrain can be brought up to speed this bike might be a gem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I took it back. I think I'll forget about it for now. I also got shed of my one remaining alumunim bike, a Haro Gomez hybrid bike. I was using for occasional commuting down the mountain to town, but decided it needed to go as well. I'm all steel again.
 
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