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i saw a couple of 1yr olds while walking my dog. .. beautifull! thin, tall, calm and moving like panthers. plus they have retriever like faces. scent hounds they are..
now RRbacks are fashionable here as guard dogs w/ very rich people who keep usually 3 of them in the big houses. i just read they hard to train and teach... and they seem to chew you house alive when they are puppies.
 

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whit417 said:
They have always been my favorite when I watch the dog shows on TV. If you are interested there is a Rhodesian Ridgeback Rescue organization.

http://www.ridgebackrescue.org/

The above link is to the national site, there are other local chapters.
"puppies have jaw power of an adult german shepperd and scalpel sharp teeth".
it also mentions their drive to destroy house and garden when young. i found a friend who has the one. he told me that when the dog was young, he chewed the electrical wiring of the garden. his mouth was full of electric shock marks and yet the dog kept eating the wires..
 

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I took a close look at ridgebacks when I was picking a dog. I went to a dog show to see the different breeds. The thing that struck me about the ridgebacks was their independence. They were all head strong and could care less about their handler. If they were not attached to the handler with a leash they would pay no attention to them at all.

I believe they were bred in Africa to guard livestock from lions and tigers and such. Any dog that can do that has to be a pretty good guard dog.
 

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bsdc said:
I took a close look at ridgebacks when I was picking a dog. I went to a dog show to see the different breeds. The thing that struck me about the ridgebacks was their independence. They were all head strong and could care less about their handler. If they were not attached to the handler with a leash they would pay no attention to them at all.

I believe they were bred in Africa to guard livestock from lions and tigers and such. Any dog that can do that has to be a pretty good guard dog.
they are not willing to obey.. easily. they are hunters, scent hunters. i believe most of scent hunters are like that. rhodesians are big game hunters but they also perform well as guard dogs. they are not shepperds. shepperds are more willing to obey and cooperate. rhodesians are not cold and unattached: they are warm, affectionate and calm. they are just stubborn.
 

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colker1 said:
they are not willing to obey.. easily. they are hunters, scent hunters. i believe most of scent hunters are like that. rhodesians are big game hunters but they also perform well as guard dogs. they are not shepperds. shepperds are more willing to obey and cooperate. rhodesians are not cold and unattached: they are warm, affectionate and calm. they are just stubborn.
I think independence and disobedience are traits of hounds in general though some are worse than others. Since hounds are bred for hunting, whether sight or scent, most are easily distracted. It's not necessarily that they are unwilli... hey, is that a squirrel? WOOF WOOF WOOF
 

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I had a...

I had a redbone hound (remember the movie "Where the Red Fern Grows") that looked very similar to the ridgeback. They (hounds in general) do what they do instinctively well; however, obeying commands is a different story. They can be trained, but the training is difficult, in that it never ends; you always have to keep working with them. I would own another in a second if the opportunity presented itself. Right now, my pointer-mix and Auvergne pointer keep me pretty busy.
 

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PsyDoc said:
I had a redbone hound (remember the movie "Where the Red Fern Grows") that looked very similar to the ridgeback. They (hounds in general) do what they do instinctively well; however, obeying commands is a different story. They can be trained, but the training is difficult, in that it never ends; you always have to keep working with them. I would own another in a second if the opportunity presented itself. Right now, my pointer-mix and Auvergne pointer keep me pretty busy.
i clicked on dogbreedinfo.com looking for a pic of the auvergne.. they don't have a pic and are lookin, asking for a contribution. why don't you send? it's a good site..
 

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I have friends with two, a boy and a girl. They are wonderful members of their family and are incredibly protective of their twin girls. Both dogs are quite well-behaved...when someone is home. Left to their own devices, however, they dig and chew and chew and dig. My friends have no ground floor screens left on windows facing their back yards. Then again, they don't have problems with coyotes in their back yard (abeam a large San Diego canyon) either. The female RR took care of that issue, sending the male out for bait and then pouncing when the coyotes attempted to attack him in force. My friends said she took down several before the rest of the coyote pack fled in panic, never to return.
 
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