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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
with new saddle.

high dollar saddle at that.

give it more time?
 

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never had a saddle that caused any issues. Turbomatic IIs, Flites, SLRs all work for me...

you didn't bother to state how much time you've given the new one...

if it still causes pain after 500 miles or so, start shopping for a replacement. for a saddle, not your richard...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
never had a saddle that caused any issues. Turbomatic IIs, Flites, SLRs all work for me...

you didn't bother to state how much time you've given the new one...

if it still causes pain after 500 miles or so, start shopping for a replacement. for a saddle, not your richard...
funny thing is is a cheap diamondback takeoff gives no issues.

makes me second guess the high $ saddles
 

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funny thing is is a cheap diamondback takeoff gives no issues. makes me second guess the high $ saddles
a $90 Flite and a $250 carbon SLR both feel fine to me.

bought the Flite because it was period-correct and the SLR for the weight...those criteria may not work for everyone tho.
 

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Try tilting the front down a few degrees while sliding the saddle forward a few millimeters.
 

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the view may lengthen & exacerbate the pain, so I've been hearing...
Just seperate from the price/comfort assumption. If you have a saddle that works then use that saddle? Who cares if it's a cheap saddle, you win! Plus, I don't think your ass knows or cares about the price of the saddle you put under it. If it works, ride it.
 

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with new saddle.

high dollar saddle at that.

give it more time?
There are 7 factors in preventing saddle numbness and pain:

1) saddle adjustment - tilt angle is very important and very small changes are noticeable

2) sitting properly - a lot of people ride too far forward on the saddle. Your "sit bones" should be perched on the rear, wide part of the saddle

3) standing up - you should never let things go numb or get painful. At the first sign of any lack of feeling or pain, pedal standing up for a short distance and repeat as necessary to bring the feeling back and prevent further numbness

4) easing up - you want to lift your rear end off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.

5) bike fit: in addition to saddle height and tilt, there is fore/aft adjustment, reach and drop to the bars, and cleat position.

6) tires: proper width with the right PSI for your weight and roads so you don't feel every single road imperfection.

7) saddle - there are some people who can ride most any saddle if it is properly adjusted (see #1) and there are some people who have problems with nearly any saddle. It's hard to predict which type you are. Work on 1-6 and if that doesn't help, THEN consider a new saddle.
 

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the view may lengthen & exacerbate the pain, so I've been hearing...
Briskly massaging the afflicted area may give temporary relief. It can be self-administered, or one can ask a friend for assistance.
 
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