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It was a beautiful day to ride. One of those days when you get on your bike and wish you could keep going. I took the camera and snapped some shots.
 

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The first pic is of a lock on the canal that runs from Havre de Grace up into Pa. Mules used to pull barges up the canal.

A root cellar.


The Quaker church built in 1767.

Fisherman on the Susquehanna fishing by the old bridge piling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
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Here are some pictures of Lapidum. Lapidum means place of rocks. The foundation picture was a group of buildings that were completely wiped out by an ice flow that stacked up from the Susquehanna river that is through the trees. The shore of the river is a good 100yards from these foundations.

Working water wheel on the Rock Run Mill.

Tubers on Deer Creek. The water has to be cold!!!!!
 

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bigrider said:
It was a beautiful day to ride. One of those days when you get on your bike and wish you could keep going. I took the camera and snapped some shots.
"Go East, Young Man." That was the title of one of William O. Douglas's many autobiographies. I should take that advice sometime. I usually go west or north when I ride from home. Your report is a reminder that I should go east to Harford County sometime, too. Great report. Thanks.
 

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MarkS said:
"Go East, Young Man." That was the title of one of William O. Douglas's many autobiographies. I should take that advice sometime. I usually go west or north when I ride from home. Your report is a reminder that I should go east to Harford County sometime, too. Great report. Thanks.

You know you have an anytime invite. I am planning a fall rbr ride here with a special twist.
 

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I like pics with historical twist to them. I would have loved to see those ice flows as far as the shear power of them. We definitely don't have anything like that around here.
 

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Great report, BR. As much as I love living in L.A., I get really envious when I see some of these areas you guys get to ride around in.

(Wow, I just ended a sentence with TWO prepositions.)
 

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That's beautiful country. Great pics, too.

Dr Roebuck...my wife was an English teacher. When we were dating I used to write her love letters. She'd send them back to me corrected. :)
 

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Mr. Versatile said:
Dr Roebuck...my wife was an English teacher. When we were dating I used to write her love letters. She'd send them back to me corrected. :)
Wow. THAT'S true love ...

So I guess your "games" include red pens and Scantrons®? :ihih:
 
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The Marquis

I grew up in Tidewater, Virginia, where the Marquis de Lafayette is a hero (there are a lot of things named "Lafayette" in Norfolk).

But I had no idea he spent anytime in Pennsylvania, Nor did I know he had to beat back a mutiny.

You learn something new everyday on RBR.com.

Here's my connection to Lafayette -- I now live in Florida, where I recently bought a house. Went through an old deed abstract I found in a closet. It traced ownership back through the years, all the way to the early 19th century, when the first deed for my acre (and many thousands more) was given by the new U.S. government to the Marquis de Lafayette, as thanks for his saving the day (and the Revolution) at Yorktown.
 

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He named my hometown

Slim Again said:
I

Here's my connection to Lafayette -- I now live in Florida, where I recently bought a house. Went through an old deed abstract I found in a closet. It traced ownership back through the years, all the way to the early 19th century, when the first deed for my acre (and many thousands more) was given by the new U.S. government to the Marquis de Lafayette, as thanks for his saving the day (and the Revolution) at Yorktown.

The City of Havre de Grace traces its origin to the day in 1658 when settler Godfrey Harmer purchased 200 acres of land that he called Harmer’s Town. That tract is the heart of the present-day Historic District of Havre de Grace. In 1695, the Lower Susquehanna Ferry made its first crossing of the river from Harmer’s Town; it continued to operate for 170 years.

The Marquis de Lafayette noted in his diary on August 29, 1782: “It has been proposed to build a city here on the right bank and near the ferry where we crossed. It should be called Havre de Grace.” The citizens took his advice, and three years later incorporated the town as The City of Havre de Grace. Later they honored Lafayette with a statue that stands at the main downtown portal, looking toward the ferry crossing that brought him to the place he called “Harbor of Mercy.”
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here is what I am talking about

Ridgetop said:
I like pics with historical twist to them. I would have loved to see those ice flows as far as the shear power of them. We definitely don't have anything like that around here.

Taken on the river I think in 1904 during the ice gorge.
 
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