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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What items would be considered essentials for riding?

For example, basics would be:
  • pump
  • tool kit
  • flat kit
  • tube(s)
  • small 1st aid kit
  • I.D.
  • cash
  • cell phone
  • keys

What would be considered important for different rides?

1 hour?

2-4 hours?

4-all day epic rides?

(Of course, this would all be dependant on other considerations such as "where" one was riding, access to stores along the route, proximity to emergency services, etc...)

I always like to have food along with me, plenty of H20 or sports drink and a camera.
 

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merckxman
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The things I always take with me are:
pump (mini), 1 tube, patch kit (in case of the extremely rare instance of a 2nd flat), dogtag for ID, money, cell. Food, if needed, I'll stop at a general store if I need something (unless you are going hard you can ride quite a long time without eating, as long as you eat well before you start). For long (100 miles), harder rides, I eat the equiv of a power bar every hour.
 

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  • CO2 Pump
    2 Cartriges - I buy mine at Wal-Mart since they're cheaper and can be bought in bulk
    Tube
    Plastic bag with money and cell
    Bag of Poptarts
    Two granola bars or cookies
    Two water bottles - One with gatorade mixture, the other water
    This is good for 2-3 hours, longer than that and I have to stop and refill bottles.
 

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What you've mentioned is what I ALWAYS carry, what lives in my seat bag all the time and goes on every ride (my "first aid kit" is a couple of bandaids in a baggie).
The rest depends on the length of the ride, the remoteness of the location etc. Northern Nevada can have fairly sudden 50-degree temperature drops, so except in summer I stick a jacket somewhere. If we're going to a remote area (common here) I make sure to have what I need to fix a broken chain. I've only broken one in 30+ years, but a chain tool and repair link don't weigh much.
For years I wouldn't carry a cell phone ("interferes with the purity and solitude of the ride"), but now I usually do. Nobody outside my family has my number, and sometimes you just don't WANT to sit down in the gutter and work on the bike.
 

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Most of my weekend ride are 4+ hours and I take very little with me..

I stop every 30 miles or so at a convenience store to re-ice my water bottle, a sports drink and an energy bar or banana..

and BTW, 7-Eleven ice lasts the longest:thumbsup: seriously..I don't know why but it lasts longer in 90 degree Texas heat than any other ice I've tried.. I completely fill my bottle with ice(no water) and use the melted ice as cold water on my rides

I only carry one water bottle and never any food...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cory said:
What you've mentioned is what I ALWAYS carry, what lives in my seat bag all the time and goes on every ride (my "first aid kit" is a couple of bandaids in a baggie).
The rest depends on the length of the ride, the remoteness of the location etc. Northern Nevada can have fairly sudden 50-degree temperature drops, so except in summer I stick a jacket somewhere. If we're going to a remote area (common here) I make sure to have what I need to fix a broken chain. I've only broken one in 30+ years, but a chain tool and repair link don't weigh much.
For years I wouldn't carry a cell phone ("interferes with the purity and solitude of the ride"), but now I usually do. Nobody outside my family has my number, and sometimes you just don't WANT to sit down in the gutter and work on the bike.
Hey Cory,

Here's something I came across that I think Roadies would like...

Altoid Tin Boxes are great for storage.

Altoids Tin Survival Kits (great tins for holding bandaids, antiseptic wipes, needle, string, etc...).





 

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What they said...

I carry 2 tubes because I got burned once with 2 flats and the wife had to take a 30 mile drive with the truck to rescue me. Since I've been carrying 2 I haven't even had a single flat...figgerz.

I carry a small mini pump to air up most of the way and top off to desired pressure with a CO2, I carry 2 cartridges.
 

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  • pump - yep. Barberi Titan One.
  • tool kit - e-3 that weighs nothing. It's amazing how little can go wrong with a road bike, and how small a tool it takes to fit everything on the bike.
  • flat kit - with glue. Stick-ons are worthless on road tubes, IME.
  • tube(s) - one usually. Two if the fly ash is still on the roads.
  • small 1st aid kit - Why? If anything I could carry can fix it, I can ride that way. (though come to think if it, a coupla butterflies might not be a bad idea. Double as a boot, too. Besides, much more than that and I'm not likely to be able to use it on myself anyway.)
  • I.D. - RoadID dogtag; or a license in the seatbag if I'm carrying credit cards (full-day rides.)
  • cash - usually a few $$ in the saddlebag, always a $20 inside the handlebar.
  • cell phone - Maybe if riding solo. Kept my last-gen, does nothing but talks candybar just for the purpose.
  • keys - Nah. I've learned to hotwire my bike. Keyless locks on the house. Worst case is the valet key from the car, if I happened to drive to ride, which is rare.
It all (save the pump) fits into a saddlebag smaller than my fist. The second tube means I have to shuflfe the phone to the jersey with my small fizik bag.

Food goes on every ride >1hr. I'm partial to Clif for bars, but I have a range of gels, sport beans, fig bars, LITTLE DEBBIE OATMEAL CREAM PIES, and homemade concoctions that I'll use to mix things up.

No (intake) stops necessary for LT 3 hrs unless it's high-noon in August, and I tend toward morning or evening riding anyway.
 

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Baltic Scum
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Just curious...

Cory said:
What you've mentioned is what I ALWAYS carry, what lives in my seat bag all the time and goes on every ride (my "first aid kit" is a couple of bandaids in a baggie)..
Why band aids?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
danl1 said:
It all (save the pump) fits into a saddlebag smaller than my fist. The second tube means I have to shuflfe the phone to the jersey with my small fizik bag.
I could definitely see myself eventually "restraining" my urge to overpack and whittling it down to the essentials (like the basics I listed) with this tiny 6" pump I saw today thats about as big as a mini-Maglite and a couple of bottles on a route where I know I'd have access to drinking and when I'd be riding for less than a couple of hours.

It'd have to be a one bag deal and I couldn't carry anything in my jersey.
I don't mind wearing a pack, but I don't like wearing anything in a jersey.

:)

Here's the "patch kit" I buy from Genuine Innovations (the have a line of products);
They were mistakenly priced at $3.99 for the large kit so I took 3 of them. :D

 

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No matter how long/far I am riding I always take the following.

Cellphone
Park multitool
Tube
Pack of Scabs tire patches.
Tire Levers.
RoadID
A Cliff Bars and some Gels.
2 Water bottles.
Tire Pump large frame size.

Don't waste your money on the small compact pumps if you are riding a road bike. They
just don't have enough to pump up road tires. My Blackburn med frame pump is barely
enough to do the job.

Ekh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
ehuber1 said:
Don't waste your money on the small compact pumps if you are riding a road bike. They
just don't have enough to pump up road tires. My Blackburn med frame pump is barely
enough to do the job.

Ekh.

Hey E,

This is what I have now in my M.U.L.E., it's a Topeak Blaster.
Nice size, extremely efficient and well built with metal parts...also has an auto selector for air valves.

 

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ehuber1 said:
Don't waste your money on the small compact pumps if you are riding a road bike. They
just don't have enough to pump up road tires. My Blackburn med frame pump is barely
enough to do the job.

Ekh.
Absolutely false.

You just have to get the right pump. There are several good ones, and many crappy ones, and more made for mtn than road use. It's also helpful use it properly. Make sure to use every mm of the stroke in and out, and either use it against the ground, or using the large muscles of the legs (between the knees.) Hand-against-hand, yeah, minipumps suck. But that's operator error.

Sorry to say so, but your blackburn frame pump is barely adequate because it's a lousy pump, not because of size. The Zefal HpX is a much better full-frame pump.
 

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2ndGen said:
It'd have to be a one bag deal and I couldn't carry anything in my jersey.
I don't mind wearing a pack, but I don't like wearing anything in a jersey.
What we've discussed easily fits in the popular small saddle packs. Only miss is food, which is small, light and needs to be in the jersey for access anyway.

Curious about your preference for a pack over jersey pockets. To me, packs are hot and uncomfortable, but stuff disappears in jersey pockets. To be sure, I didn't always feel that way. For me, the difference was in getting jerseys that fit properly - too loose made things seem uncomfortable back there, but once I learned how they needed to fit (and bought decent quality stuff) those complaints disappeared. Not at all saying that's your situation, just describing my sensations.

I'd be interested in hearing more about the reasoning behind your preference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
danl1 said:
What we've discussed easily fits in the popular small saddle packs. Only miss is food, which is small, light and needs to be in the jersey for access anyway.

Curious about your preference for a pack over jersey pockets. To me, packs are hot and uncomfortable, but stuff disappears in jersey pockets. To be sure, I didn't always feel that way. For me, the difference was in getting jerseys that fit properly - too loose made things seem uncomfortable back there, but once I learned how they needed to fit (and bought decent quality stuff) those complaints disappeared. Not at all saying that's your situation, just describing my sensations.

I'd be interested in hearing more about the reasoning behind your preference.
Hey Dan.

Actually, when you put "ice" in a Camelbak bladder and that rests against your back, it keeps you cool.


I guess I got conditioned to not wanting anything pressed up against my body from my work. I could never stand to have anything in my pockets for movement. I always kept things in my tool belt (including my wallet and keys and cell phone).

When I work or ride, I like to keep the bike free of clutter and my body free of anything that could fall out or that would be "felt" against my body.

The pack is suspended off my body and has these air passages under them allowing air to circulate.
It's a very comfortable feeling for me and the security of not having anything that can fall out gives me great peace of mind.
I can ride hard, pedal hard and fly without a worry (plus, it's nice to have a place to store my helmet when I make a stop and to store my shades in a protected case along with my gloves).

A place for everything and everything in it's place.

:)

I can appreciate getting my body as clutterless as I like my bike to be.

Again, I'll give it a try.

If it interrupts with "my" pleasure of riding and takes away from the experience,
then I'll stick with a simple small light pack on my back.
 

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My list

Frame pump
1 or 2 water bottles, depending on distance and temperature
5mm and 4mm allen keys
mobile phone
ID and money
2 spare tubes (city riding) or 1 spare tube and patch kit (country riding)
2 plastic tire levers
CO2 inflator
House key

Food, only if more than 25 miles. Then it's fruit or bars or gels etc.

2ndGen said:
What items would be considered essentials for riding?

For example, basics would be:
  • pump
  • tool kit
  • flat kit
  • tube(s)
  • small 1st aid kit
  • I.D.
  • cash
  • cell phone
  • keys

What would be considered important for different rides?

1 hour?

2-4 hours?

4-all day epic rides?

(Of course, this would all be dependant on other considerations such as "where" one was riding, access to stores along the route, proximity to emergency services, etc...)

I always like to have food along with me, plenty of H20 or sports drink and a camera.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I just reallized I never put up my list....

  • Tire Levers (3)
  • Crank Bros Multi Tool 17
  • Topeak Blaster Pump
  • Genuine Innovations Patch Kit
  • Iron Man Sunglasses
  • First Aid Kit
  • Adjustable Wrench
  • Needlenose Pliers
  • Multi-Tool Knife
  • Razor Blade
  • Whistle
  • Small Tupperware Container (for snacks)
  • I.D.
  • Cash
  • Keys
  • Credit Card
  • Tire Gauge
  • Strip of Duct Tape
  • Self Adhering Roofing Rubber Membrane Strips (excellent for repairing gashes in tires)

Plus, my pack can hold my gloves & helmet all stored in one place.

:)
 

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Each of my bikes are packed differently, but this is what is in my road bike saddle bag (PI tailgate)
  • 2 tubes
  • park tools stick on patches (~3, I've had just as good of luck with them as the glue on for a ride, I'll properly glue it when I get home)
  • parks tools boot
  • 6" long piece of old tire (heavy duty boot if needed)
  • 2 CO2 cartridges
  • mini pump with CO2 head
  • small knife
  • crank brothers mini tool kit
  • 2 SRAM quick links for my chain
  • 8 links of chain
  • 3 tire levers
  • some cash
  • small 10sp chain tool
  • couple bandaides

I always wear a road ID and throw my cell phone, driver's license, CC, and a GU in my jersey pocket as well.

Depending on the day I'll have 1 or 2 water bottles and 1 to many GUs or other gels and bars like lara bars etc. Also like powerbar soft chews on longer and harder rides, for lighter rides, I'll bring along a sandwich or two ...
 
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