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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help a brother out. Been riding in the heat lately on some rather long rides, century last weekend and did pretty well for about 75 but hit the wall afterward. I am taking hammer enduralyte pills, about 2 an hour (42 yrs 200 lbs) drinking water & gatorade, eating bananas, gels, pb sandwichs, etc. Someone gave me some salt pills after I bonked, what els can I do? Some idea from those that know.
 

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How fast and how hot? What are you comsuming and when?

I ride in the desert and I noticed that I last longer on Gatorade's endurance formula (twice the salt) as I do on the regular stuff on hot days (and we have PLENTY of hot days, Phoenix).

We'd need to to know what you have when to get a good idea of what's working and what isn't.

My program is as follows:
Watered down energy drink (g-rade endurance, Cytomax, endurawhateverit'scalled)
Clif Shot Blocks every 30 minutes
Fig Newton's , maybe 2 an hour.

I usually drink 1.5 bottle per hour of riding in the heat. In heat over 100 it's two bottles per hour.
 

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Carbo load?

What about your eating habits a few days before your long rides? Have you been loading up on carbohydrates? I notice I really drag on big rides if I don't eat the right stuff a few days and the night before.

Besides trying to eat right the night(s) before, I usually drink 16-28 ounces of Cytomax per hour, one Gu gel and a half Clif Bar every 30-45 minutes while riding.
 

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I over-heat before I bonk. So try & carb up before the ride for at least 2 days w/ pasta or rice w/ chicken, good bread, bananas in a protein shake, etc. I drink mostly water & weak sports drinks during the ride. If I eat anything high carb I heat up more & feel ill. Fruits like pineapple & grapes seem to go down well. Bananas only bloat me so I eat a small amt of dried apricots or raisins for potassium & chew them well. When you figure it out let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Timmons said:
How fast and how hot? What are you comsuming and when

We were averaging 20.6 at the 77 mile post stop. I ate a banana and muffin for breakfast with water and a coffee. Had past the night before and a few glasses of wine. This speed was a little fast for me based on the miles I had in the previous few weeks. SAhould I have a larger breakfast? I ate about an hour before the ride and tried to continue to eat as I went. It is tough toi eat in the heat.
 

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You say "hit the wall" and "bonked". One means that you got tired, one means that your blood sugar ran low. Then you said that you got salt tablets when you bonked. That's good if you are down on electrolye, but that's different from bonking or getting tired.

If you can figure out what your actual problem was, you'll be able to address it. Here's the various symptoms for me. Yours may vary.

When I am low on electrolyte, sports drink tastes really bad. I start craving water. Eating salt fixes it almost immediately. A couple endurolytes per hour is enough for me unless I get behind, then I need more. Eating doesn't fix low electrolyte, unless it's salty food.

When I bonk, sports drink tastes good. Anything with calories tastes good. Mmmm, food.

When I'm tired because I went too hard, none of the above help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ericm979 said:
You say "hit the wall" and "bonked". One means that you got tired, one means that your blood sugar ran low. Then you said that you got salt tablets when you bonked. That's good if you are down on electrolye, but that's different from bonking or getting tired.

If you can figure out what your actual problem was, you'll be able to address it. Here's the various symptoms for me. Yours may vary.

When I am low on electrolyte, sports drink tastes really bad. I start craving water. Eating salt fixes it almost immediately. A couple endurolytes per hour is enough for me unless I get behind, then I need more. Eating doesn't fix low electrolyte, unless it's salty food.

When I bonk, sports drink tastes good. Anything with calories tastes good. Mmmm, food.

When I'm tired because I went too hard, none of the above help.
Thanks, Good information:

I have definately had the problem of sports drinks tasting bad, and electrolyte tablets did help. I guess my last adventure was the wall based on your description.
 

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West End Rail said:
Had past the night before and a few glasses of wine. This speed was a little fast for me based on the miles I had in the previous few weeks.
Don't lose sight of the alcohol's impact on your body. One glass of wine probably won't be a significant impact. A 'few' certainly can be - alcohol dehydrates you so it's very possible you were starting off the day with a fluid deficit and weren't able to catch up before you lost your strength.

Save the alcohol for after a long ride, hydrate before.
 
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What do you call "riding in the heat?" Is this New Jersey heat with humidity? I did
44 miles yesterday outside of Palm Springs, CA; it was officially 107 in the shade.
I don't know what it was where I was riding in the sun and on asphalt. And, it wasn't even June. I onced had a baking thermometer attached to the bicycle frame; I removed it when it showed 147 degrees on a ride. As far as hydration, I just follow the Sparkletts water truck and I ambush roach coaches at construction sites. PS: humidity was 6 per cent.
 

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The problems that I have had while riding in the heat of Texas have revolved around hydration. I have found that I do better on long rides if I have to stop to use the portapotty every 20 miles. If I don't feel the need at the 20 mile mark, I haven't been drinking enough. I too feel the Gatoraid Endurance product works better for me than the regular. I also like to drink a diluted Cran-Raspberry. I think the amount of liquid is more important than what the liquid is. The CamelBak slogan of "Hydrate or die" can be very prophetic.
 

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Don't underestimate the heat....

In 2004 I was making a century attempt and it was about 98 degrees out and
humid as all get-out. By the time I realized I was probably doing something
stupid it was actually about 102 degrees and I saw a fit, skinny triathlete type
woman pushing her expensive Quintana Roo tri bike and looking rather dazed.

I asked her if she needed some assistance and it turns out she was doing a
century too but ran out of water at 60 miles and just decided to bail because
she had no $ and could find no sources of public water. She was within a
mile or two of her home and she just looked wiped out.

At the 40 mile point I bailed on it, I realized that I was going thru water like
mad.

When I got home later I got a pretty bad leg cramp which I almost never get.
I totally underestimated the effects of the heat and humidity.

Later I realized I should have not only water but energy bars, gus and also
something to replenish the salt stores.
 

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There is a lot of good information in this thread. One thing I would like to point out is that we all have different types of engines.

My engine is one that sweats like a pig in hot weather so I must hydrate regularly. I handle the heat better than most. Like others have said, preparation for a long effort starts days before.Eating the right foods to stoke the muscles with energy.

For me, eating on the ride with breaks makes all the difference. When my legs get tired, just a few minutes off the bike helps a lot. I don't eat the energy bars and such since I believe in eating whole foods, not processed foods. I take bananas, apples, whole grain raisin bread (fresh ground flour, not refined flour, it makes a big difference in digestablility) and a trail mix of salted nuts, raisins and chocolate bits.

The trail mix replaces electrolytes. Bananas for me go down find with an apple, not alone. The point is to eat high-glycemic foods that are easily digested. For me, the bread is great because it is easily digestible, being high in fiber compared to white bread. Apples are juicy and help the mouth to produces saliva that keeps the throat from getting irritated.

I am able to stay strong on long rides by being sensible. Rather than hitting a wall it is, for me, more like a battery running down. Just like a battery, if I sit still for a few minutes I can get a float charge and feel better for a while.

Do read up on sports nutrition. There are plenty of good books out there. Learn about endurance training. Work yourself up to longer rides over time. Hitting a wall means you exceeded the limits you are prepared for. Learn about eating the right foods and what foods you eat when. One particular bit of wisdom is after a ride: you can eat high-fat and high-glycemic foods (think ice cream) within a half hour after a hard ride.The food will be converted to glycogen and will fuel the muscles. Wait too long and the food is converted to fat instead.

What food is good for you depends on your particular engine. What works for me may not work for you.
 

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It's possible to get used to riding in the heat. Obviously "hot" is different for different people. If you are used to riding at 45 degrees F in the spring and it goes to 75 on the first warm day, you may be suffering pretty hard. But by the end of summer, 75 is kinda chilly.

One thing I've noticed as I get older is that I need electrolytes on long hot rides. On my first Death Ride it was very hot, approaching 100, and I was drinking a lot of water. I eventually developed hyponatremia, although I didn't know that was what it was at the time. I've never suffered as bad as I did on the last pass that day- I was bloated, cramping, sick, and could barely turn the pedals. Keeping going was the hardest thing I have ever done.

Eventually on another long hot ride I figured it out when I was starting to feel ill at the 90 mile stop, munched some salty pretzels and suddenly felt MUCH better. I tried carrying plain salt for a while, but Endurolytes work better. I only seem to need them on rides longer than 5-6 hours but they take longer to work than plain salt, so I need to start taking them early.
 
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Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

West End Rail said:
Help a brother out. Been riding in the heat lately on some rather long rides, century last weekend and did pretty well for about 75 but hit the wall afterward. I am taking hammer enduralyte pills, about 2 an hour (42 yrs 200 lbs) drinking water & gatorade, eating bananas, gels, pb sandwichs, etc. Someone gave me some salt pills after I bonked, what els can I do? Some idea from those that know.
It was 111 yesterday and today in the shade in Palm Springs; expected to be 113 tomorrow and Saturday. Start your ride at 4:30am; be back home by 9:30pm...
unless you have a light. Caution: about 4pm, the little elderly people get out of their bridge clubs and they are in their Cadillacs; they drive in all lanes using the curbs as
Botz Dots. They look through the stearing wheel rather than over it; so, you are having
a good afternoon if they see you. Or, think they see you. PS: use a suntan lotion
with a PF factor of 4,500. Remember: Palm Springs is where the old folks go...
to visit their parents.
 

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"PS: humidity was 6 per cent."

ROLF! I didn't even know that was possible. On the way home from work a couple of days ago, the temp was 90, the humidity was 85%. It's been very cool/cold here through most of May, so I was unacustomed to the heat. I downed 40 oz of water in an 18 mi. ride.
 
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I once lived in Oklahoma

Mr. Versatile said:
"PS: humidity was 6 per cent."

ROLF! I didn't even know that was possible. On the way home from work a couple of days ago, the temp was 90, the humidity was 85%. It's been very cool/cold here through most of May, so I was unacustomed to the heat. I downed 40 oz of water in an 18 mi. ride.
I remember those days with 98 degree temps and 95 per cent humidity. Mesquitos,
no-see-ums, flies, and other bugs along for the ride. In Palm Springs, on a bad day
humidity will be 37 per cent. A bad day in Palm Springs is better than most everywhere
else. Ride early; ride often (or is that Chicago politics?)
 

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I don't think so

Museum of Zero Tolerance said:
I remember those days with 98 degree temps and 95 per cent humidity
I believe that when you saw the morning weather, the humidity was 95% and that later that day, the temperature got to 98 degrees, but it was HIGHLY unlikely that it was 95% humidity at 98 degrees. From my handy dandy psychrometric chart, in order for this to be the case, the dew point would have to be about 96 degrees. IOW, a glass of 95 degree water would cause condensation. I don't think so!
 

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Kerry Irons said:
I believe that when you saw the morning weather, the humidity was 95% and that later that day, the temperature got to 98 degrees, but it was HIGHLY unlikely that it was 95% humidity at 98 degrees. From my handy dandy psychrometric chart, in order for this to be the case, the dew point would have to be about 96 degrees. IOW, a glass of 95 degree water would cause condensation. I don't think so!
Back east around water and in a rainy month in the summer, yes it can be that hot and have that dew point and have that relative humidity. It's miserable. You can't get rid of heat by sweating because the air is so saturated already. One thing, though, the slightest breeze feels pretty good.

I'm out west now, in the Sacramento valley. It gets hot here, but the humidity is much lower and makes it more comfortable.
 

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Still nope

Insight Driver said:
Back east around water and in a rainy month in the summer, yes it can be that hot and have that dew point and have that relative humidity.
So you're saying that it starts to fog when the temperature drops to 95 degrees? I don't thinks so! An 80 F dew point (50% RH at 98 F) is incredibly oppressive, and I have seen fog at that temperature on the Gulf Coast. Except for localized effects, like water evaporating off hot pavement after a rain, you will NOT see conditions you describe. Again, you're saying that a glass of 95 F water will get condensation on it. No way Jose'.
 

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That's the way I remember it

Kerry Irons said:
So you're saying that it starts to fog when the temperature drops to 95 degrees? I don't thinks so! An 80 F dew point (50% RH at 98 F) is incredibly oppressive, and I have seen fog at that temperature on the Gulf Coast. Except for localized effects, like water evaporating off hot pavement after a rain, you will NOT see conditions you describe. Again, you're saying that a glass of 95 F water will get condensation on it. No way Jose'.
I left Oklahoma after grad school in 1967; I remember toweling off after showering;
but, I could never get dry. It was time for another shower. That's the Oklahoma I remember. I'll check out some of the temp/humidity/dew point/dry and wet adiabatic lifting condensation levels and get back to you. Not that I am Dr. George...
 
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