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Went for a group ride Sunday and hit a patch of road for a couple of miles that just boggled my mind. I questioned whether or not I was in the 1800's. This is no exaggeration when I say it was the worst road I have ever seen in my life. Usually you can pick a relatively clean line to ride, even if you have to slalom all over the place. On this road, even that was impossible. I honestly thought some part of the bike was going to break. I couldn't even sit on the saddle at some points. And what blows my mind is that this is the route chosen by the group. Maybe it's a necessary evil in that this road MUST be travelled to get from point A to B. What made it worse was that the group still tried to maintain somewhat of a paceline. I fell off the back about 10 yards so I could see the road better and at least take the smaller of the potholes.

What will regular riding in these conditions do to your components? The only that I can think of that could be damaged is your headset/headtube. I've got an integrated setup, so I think this especially would hold true. I don't even want to look inside the headtube to see what happened. I did (as I expected) have to tighted the headset when I got home. The snug adjustment I keep on the headset had rattled itself loose over that road. Probably had the cartridge bearings going clunk, clunk, clunk, against the headtube.
 

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have you ever ridden pave? bad cobbles will make your road look like silky velodrome, it is harder then unpaved trails or fireroads. I killed headset riding cobbles. For bad roads you want fatter tires, 32 spokes, steel frame/fork, comfortable seat and good quality headset, well adjusted not too tight or loose. Stay relaxed as much as possible, no death grip and in bad section get off the saddle.
 

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scruffy nerf herder
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I would worry about the wheels more....

and your handlebars.... rather than any of the components!!!

I live in Missouri and potholes are actually used as landmarks for giving directions.... in fact, small beavers often take up residence in them and actually gave rise to the "Bop a Mole" game often found in Chucky Cheeses and Showbiz Pizza places... however "Bop a Beaver" took on other perverted connotations, so...

Check your wheels, rims, and your handlebars.
 

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You talking to me?
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This sounds like advice for mountain biking

CycloPathic said:
For bad roads you want fatter tires, 32 spokes, steel frame/fork, comfortable seat and good quality headset, well adjusted not too tight or loose. Stay relaxed as much as possible, no death grip and in bad section get off the saddle.
12345
 

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Old, slow, and fat.
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filly said:
Went for a group ride Sunday and hit a patch of road for a couple of miles that just boggled my mind. I questioned whether or not I was in the 1800's. This is no exaggeration when I say it was the worst road I have ever seen in my life. Usually you can pick a relatively clean line to ride, even if you have to slalom all over the place. On this road, even that was impossible. I honestly thought some part of the bike was going to break. I couldn't even sit on the saddle at some points. And what blows my mind is that this is the route chosen by the group. Maybe it's a necessary evil in that this road MUST be travelled to get from point A to B. What made it worse was that the group still tried to maintain somewhat of a paceline. I fell off the back about 10 yards so I could see the road better and at least take the smaller of the potholes.

What will regular riding in these conditions do to your components? The only that I can think of that could be damaged is your headset/headtube. I've got an integrated setup, so I think this especially would hold true. I don't even want to look inside the headtube to see what happened. I did (as I expected) have to tighted the headset when I got home. The snug adjustment I keep on the headset had rattled itself loose over that road. Probably had the cartridge bearings going clunk, clunk, clunk, against the headtube.
Since I didn't see the road you were riding, all I can say is sometimes rough roads are fun.

Watch the Belgian races in the spring. When the riders get to the pave, they all shift to a big-arse gear and hammer. That way you hit the tops of the bumps, and the pressure on the pedals reduces pressure on your saddle.

Take the opportunity to go OTF and have a good time. Wait for the guys at the end of the bad section and resume the paceline.

That help?

Mike
 

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Ti me up
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For real

CycloPathic said:
bad cobbles will make your road look like silky velodrome, it is harder then unpaved trails or fireroads. I killed headset riding cobbles. For bad roads you want fatter tires, 32 spokes, steel frame/fork, comfortable seat and good quality headset, well adjusted not too tight or loose. Stay relaxed as much as possible, no death grip and in bad section get off the saddle.
For real. I'll take a short stretch of bad road over long stretch of cobbles any day (not that I like the bad road, either). Or out in the country west of D/FW, there are a lot of roads where they've had farm machinery go over them when the blacktop was soft, and gives you a nasty grooved thing that can go on for miles. Did a group ride last year on my one-and-only aluminum road bike (low-end one with harsh, buzzy frame, since disposed of). Grooved pavement, frame that passes along every vibration and needing to pee real bad are a horrible combo!
 

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Non non normal
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There was a pothole so huge here that a guy was offering a 10 dollar burro ride to look at the bottom.
 
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