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Jack of no trades
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see a lot of pro racers in this position when they are really hammering along, way up on the tip of the saddle nose. This position no longer allows the sit bones to rest on the padded portion of the saddle, and instead find the narrow nose probing a place that would be very uncomfortable for anyone suffering a flareup of hemorrhoids.

Is there a special technique to doing this? I would assume that when you're going full out, that the majority of your weight is transferred to the pedals, so essentially a large percentage of your body-weight is off the saddle. Is this correct? I've tried scooting forward, and find it extremely uncomfortable. I just can't see how it is a benefit to performance.

What are your comments on this?
 

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If a rider wants to increase speed they push down harder. To push down harder more quad recruitment occurs. To get max quad recruitment moving forward helps. As the rider increases speed it becomes harder maintain or increase speed due to aero drag. To overcome drag (to a degree) the rider needs to get low. Moving forward allows a rider to preserve a desirable (open) hip angle to produce power when their upper body is "low".

You are correct in that when you are really pushing hard a portion of your weight is taken off the saddle to the pedals. Sitting forward in such a manner going really easy hurts really bad. Don't do that.
 

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You scoot forward because you want to get your front end lower and more aero while opening up your hip angle.

When you're pushing 500+ watts, there's no way to be comfortable. That's just part of going really, really, really fast.
 

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Take as much weight as possible off the saddle. Gave myself a hemorrhoid sitting on the nose of my TT saddle. My particular TT saddle wasn't designed for that. Never made that mistake again.
 

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Referred to as riding 'on the rivet,' as in the large rivet on the nose of the old leather saddles. Agree with above, nothing comfortable about it but it's about maximizing the power down.
 

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I've tried scooting forward, and find it extremely uncomfortable. I just can't see how it is a benefit to performance.
I could be wrong in assuming others are like me but I don't think it's something anyone just tries or decides to do and it just happens instinctively when it's the only option left for going a little faster. No doubt just giving it a whirl on a random ride would be brutal.......but when you're giving 100% hanging on a wheel by the skin of your teeth and it just happens by instinct it's really not painful.
 

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Jack of no trades
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You don't want to be resting on your sphincter but rather the perineum.

Alternatively:
https://youtu.be/1tgS1n7DQbY?t=42s
I'm always on the perineum. Not sure if it's the proper way to do it or not, but I tip my hips forward and am always in a more aerodynamic posture. I can't sit up. Nor can I go slow. Odd as that sounds, both are uncomfortable for me.
 

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I would assume that when you're going full out, that the majority of your weight is transferred to the pedals, so essentially a large percentage of your body-weight is off the saddle. Is this correct?
Yes, this is correct. At high power outputs, the weight on the saddle is pretty much zero. In that mode, saddle contact is mostly to help stabilize the bike. I forgot where I saw that number, but I think I read somewhere that at power output in the range of around 4W/kg the percentage of your body weight that's actually supported by the saddle is less than 20%.
 

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I could be wrong in assuming others are like me but I don't think it's something anyone just tries or decides to do and it just happens instinctively when it's the only option left for going a little faster. No doubt just giving it a whirl on a random ride would be brutal.......but when you're giving 100% hanging on a wheel by the skin of your teeth and it just happens by instinct it's really not painful.
Maybe im wrong with you, but I am the same... It's never a decision... I notice I'm "on the rivet" at max efforts and it never hurts. Like Pirx and others say, you are off the saddle pretty much. But you don't move up and hammer, it's not a position you move into (if that makes sense), you flip the all-out switch and wind up there and it doesn't really hurt. At least this is my experience, Swift nailed it.
 
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