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I need advice on which bike to purchase between the Ridley Damocles or the Pinarello Paris Carbon. I'm 6' 2", 175 lbs and plan to use a new bike to ride the Sierra Century and the tour of the California Alps, among other rides. I would need a bigger size (60 - 61cm) but the Paris Carbon's biggest size is 59.5cm, as opposed to the choices of L or XL with the Damocles. However, the Paris weighs in at a paltry 998 grams compared to the Damocles at 1200 grams (still light). I'm only over thinking the weight issue since I'll be riding at elevation. The majority of the rides I do would involve climbing, so does one bike edge out the other?
 

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Don't know about the Damocles, but I recently got an Excalibur and it is stiff and quick. very quick. Corners really well, stable yet responsive.
Sudden sprinting is well rewarding, yet not a harsh ride. Nice.
 

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It's not the frame so much as proper fit and lightweight wheels that makes a good a climbing bike. As usual, someone comes on here looking for the lightest bike, thinking that will make a difference. Once you put yourself on that bike, the difference between a 2lb frame and a 4lb frame works out to be less than a one percent difference in total weight. Almost insignificant for anyone but an elite athlete.:mad2:
 

· Adrenalina Italiana
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I recently did a century with over 9000 ft.of climbing

tamvalleylegend said:
I need advice on which bike to purchase between the Ridley Damocles or the Pinarello Paris Carbon. I'm 6' 2", 175 lbs and plan to use a new bike to ride the Sierra Century and the tour of the California Alps, among other rides. I would need a bigger size (60 - 61cm) but the Paris Carbon's biggest size is 59.5cm, as opposed to the choices of L or XL with the Damocles. However, the Paris weighs in at a paltry 998 grams compared to the Damocles at 1200 grams (still light). I'm only over thinking the weight issue since I'll be riding at elevation. The majority of the rides I do would involve climbing, so does one bike edge out the other?
with my Paris carbon and can honestly say that its shines most on the downhills.This bikes tracks better than most bikes that I have been lucky to ride.Just point it in the direction and ride! It climbs pretty good,but the downhills are what come to mind first with this bike! If I was going to spend that much money on a frame to climb with,I'd be looking at other frames as well ,because these bikes aren't known for their lightness.

On a side note,just something else for you to tool over, i'm 6'1" 175lbs. and went with a 57.5 with a 120 stem.I don't know your full body specs but I would definately look into getting the shorter frame if you go with this bike.That will knock a little weight off.I built mine up with Full Dura ace10v.,Ksyrium wheels,Deda Newton stem and bars and ti Look keo pedals with a SLR saddle and it came in a shade under 17lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good thing you don't charge, spindawg...

SPINDAWG said:
with my Paris carbon and can honestly say that its shines most on the downhills.This bikes tracks better than most bikes that I have been lucky to ride.Just point it in the direction and ride! It climbs pretty good,but the downhills are what come to mind first with this bike! If I was going to spend that much money on a frame to climb with,I'd be looking at other frames as well ,because these bikes aren't known for their lightness.

On a side note,just something else for you to tool over, i'm 6'1" 175lbs. and went with a 57.5 with a 120 stem.I don't know your full body specs but I would definately look into getting the shorter frame if you go with this bike.That will knock a little weight off.I built mine up with Full Dura ace10v.,Ksyrium wheels,Deda Newton stem and bars and ti Look keo pedals with a SLR saddle and it came in a shade under 17lbs.

...I would owe you big time. thanks for the abundance of info. Not everyone knows what it's like riding at elevation, and you seem to understand why I'm trying to find out the nuance of each bike.

Have you used shorter frames in the past or did you choose a 57.5 cm/120 stem solely because the Paris Carbon is made no larger than 59.5?
 

· naranjito
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I'll confirm what spindawg said - the paris carbon shines most on the downhills, but that doesn't mean to say it's not good at everything else too! I'm also 6'1 and have the 54cm size. If it's of any use, my BB-saddle height is exactly 780mm, saddle setback is 9cm, and tip of saddle to centre of bars is 560mm horizontally and 100mm vertically (drop). I have a deda 120mm stem.

and don't believe everything they tell you about the weight - my frame, uncut fork and headset weighed 1660g. I have the bike built with neutrons, chorus, record alu cranks, mavic brakes, michelin open pro, deda newton OS bars and stem, arione, keos... bike weight is dead on 8kg, ready to ride but without water bottles. I could lighten it by another kg easily, even hit the UCI limit if I wanted, but why spend the money? there are plenty of big mountains over here and I can get over them with the fastest... A light bike is nice, but I'm experienced enough to know that it won't make me any faster!

foz
 

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Have you ridden a Paris Carbon? Reason I ask is that I am 6'2" and weigh 170 pounds and I have ridden a Paris Carbon. Size, 57.5 Reason, top tube length. Don't buy this bike if you haven't ridden it because I believe the 59.5 will be too big. My old ride is on a 63 but the top tube on the frame is 57. So I really had difficulty believing that the small 57.5 would fit. Test rode a Galeleo at 58 and the Prince at 57.5 felt better. Just a warning. My second test ride was for 40 miles and the ride was so amazing that against all bias (light weight bikes, new technology, carbon won't make that much difference over my vintage ride) that I am buying the Pinarello next week. Stamp
 

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Good Climbing Bikes

Hi: I just rode the California Tour of the Alps this month and you are right to be concerned about altitude and weight! It is a very challenging ride of 128 miles and 5 mountain passes and 16,000 feet of elevation gain. Elevation varies from 5500 to 8700 feet and the terrain is stunning from eastern sierra high desert to alpine sierra passes. Many riders do just a portion of the route and have a very fulfilling experience. This is the second time I've ridden this annual event on my 58 cm Trek 5900 which performed well and is about 17.5 lbs with pedals. Gearing is important and I'm using a compact FSA crankset and with Dura Ace but even went so far to change to an XTR rear derailleur with a 11-34 rear cassette! I did some training rides using a standard 12-27 rear cassette but the cumulative effect of so much climbing is additive especially at altitude. In short, the most important considerations are, in order of priority: proper training with several century's beforehand, a comfortable, well-fitting bike with proper set-up and course strategy (start early, hydrate continuously, eat at summits, minimize time in rest stops.)

After this year's ride, I had some concern about my bike fit as mentioned above. I came across the following fit calculator: http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO
Surprisingly, I've been riding a 58 cm Trek, am 175 and am 5ft 11. The fit calculator shows that I should be in a 53 or 54 frameset size with top tube length being the most important indicator. I've since gone to a local pro shop and confirmed that a medium Look 585 fits perfectly which is 53 cm. This size allow more seat post to be exposed giving a more cushioned ride and a stem length of 10 to 11 cm which is optimal for bike control and handling.

As far as your original question: which of these two bikes will the best climber? I don't have first hand experience with either. However looking at the front runners on the tour who won the mountain stages, Landis on BMC pro machine; Oscar Pierero on Pinarello, Rasmussin on Colnago, Sastra on Cervelo R3. I've ridden the R3 and it is a superb climber. All these bikes are probably set-up to be at the legal weight limit. A strong, light wheelset is an important factor which make the long climbs easier and the descents fun and excilerating. Finally I made the decision to get a properly fit bike for next year's ride and have a 53cm BMC pro machine on order.

Good luck in your decision and future riding!
 
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