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Crusty AF
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1,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Office safety may have officially lost the plot.

Coming back from a, uh, "waste management meeting", I walked through a group of 6 people dry fitting those round mirrors you see in parking garages to the office ceilings. My guess is to help people moving at a walking pace avoid bumping into each other as they go around a corner.

This officially a solution in search of a problem.

https://www.inc.com/suzanne-lucas/why-focusing-on-safety-can-be-very-dangerous.html?cid=sf01001
 

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Crusty AF
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1,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nah. We're a big enough company they have software to do that.
 

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half-fast
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7,386 Posts
Could be worse.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...-regulators-fine-goodwill-for-employees-death

The surviving worker in this accident was fired for being a problem, or a thorn in the company's side, depending on who you believe.

I'm not saying that the nanny culture is the way to go, but there is a duty to protect those we work with.

Those mirrors aren't going to do anything anyhow. What you need is a proximity sensor in people's mobile devices to put off a tone and vibrate to warn of collision hazards.
 

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What's needed is for people to quit looking at their ******* phones when they're walking around and to have some situational awareness.
 

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Crusty AF
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Could be worse.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st...-regulators-fine-goodwill-for-employees-death

The surviving worker in this accident was fired for being a problem, or a thorn in the company's side, depending on who you believe.

I'm not saying that the nanny culture is the way to go, but there is a duty to protect those we work with.

Those mirrors aren't going to do anything anyhow. What you need is a proximity sensor in people's mobile devices to put off a tone and vibrate to warn of collision hazards.
Don't get me wrong. I quite like going home to get both hugs and grief (sometimes concurrently) from my 3YO. I work mainly with the mining sector, and am all for protecting workers in environments like that. I just feel that when bumping into someone in the hallway is considered a near miss, a bit of perspective is needed. As the article I linked indicates: when you start treating everything as a genuine hazard, you stop taking the real ones as seriously as you should. Your signal-to-noise ratio goes to $hit and you get safety fatigue.
 

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half-fast
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Don't get me wrong. I quite like going home to get both hugs and grief (sometimes concurrently) from my 3YO. I work mainly with the mining sector, and am all for protecting workers in environments like that. I just feel that when bumping into someone in the hallway is considered a near miss, a bit of perspective is needed. As the article I linked indicates: when you start treating everything as a genuine hazard, you stop taking the real ones as seriously as you should. Your signal-to-noise ratio goes to $hit and you get safety fatigue.
That's true.
 

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Custom Title= ?
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My office staff wear life jackets due to the constant risk of becoming inundated in bull$hit.
 

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Avid smart-ass
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Why don't they just have the staff cover themselves in bubble wrap every morning? Or buy inflatable sumo wrestler costumes for everyone?
 

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Crusty AF
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Why don't they just have the staff cover themselves in bubble wrap every morning? Or buy inflatable sumo wrestler costumes for everyone?
Because we're a consulting firm, and those measures aren't project billable :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I'm in the same boat as drussel, Rio Tinto has even been a client. I'm also the office H&S guy (in an office of 2).

The thing you need to remember about a lot of the H&S "nanny state" isn't so much that relative non-issues need to be treated as genuine hazards for their own sake. It's that doing that helps modify employee behavior / corporate culture so that looking for and recognizing hazards becomes second nature.

Google "the Bradly Model" or "incident pyramid". Basically, for every 10,000 "bumping into someone in the hall" incidents that you prevent, you also prevent a much smaller number of serious incidents. If you create a culture that obsesses over paper cuts etc. your employees automatically become trained to recognize "real" hazards too.

But I agree, all the work to document that minor stuff is a pain in the butt. And not billable.
 
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