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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone looked at Rivendell's Quickbeam? Anyone have one?

I'm considering adding a fixed to my collection (Bridgestone MB-1, Merckx Corsa 01, bent Bridgestone RB-1 frame that may someday be repaired) and the Rivendell strikes me as being the most practical and thoughtfully designed for how I intend to use it. The price is a bit high, but I'm willing to pay for a versatile, well-made, and high-quality bike.

Other options (so far) are a Raleigh Rush Hour or a Bianchi, but I'd much rather have steel, and the features of the Rivendell are just toooooo attractive. What other options are out there for steel fixed-gear?

Anyway, thanks for your inputs.


BozemanboB
 

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The stock bike is a two-speed SS bike (no derailleur). I suppose that one of the two chainlines is straight enough for fixed gear opertaion, but that would be something to confirm. It would be a nice, long-distance fixie if it works out.
 

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Rivendell? Zzzzz... honestly, over priced.

How do you intend to use it? Want fat tires? Look at a On-One il Pompino (canti brakes!) or Surly Steamroller. Want 1" threaded steer tube? Look at the DeBernardi Thorn.

Also look out for a Kogswell F-series or one of their newer fixed frames.
 

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Well, the budget raleigh and bianchi bikes are steel, although nothing fancy. IMO, the LeMond Fillmore has a much nicer frame, at least for road riding, than the bikes you mention--you give up the lugs of the quickbeam, which is likely a nice bike for the distinctive sort of thing it is, but you get a tt platinum ox tubeset and the thing is nicely tacked together. It's a fixed gear road bike, not a trackie, but it's a good road bike.
 

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Great looking bike, but not my style.

I see one most every month at our commuter breakfast. It looks like a lonnnng wheel base and low bottom bracket. If it were my money, I'd spend it on an old timey Italian racing frame or British tourist with horizontal drop outs and one speed. Versatility is a good thing, but part of my fun with the fixie is making my legs so much more versatile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, for cryin' out loud!

Thanks all for your inputs... got me off my retro-grouch duff and looking at the rest of the world. And the real world, too, where bikes are m-u-c-h more affordable.

Also reminded me that when I went to the LBS last week asking about SS, they guy pointed me at the Redline 925 on the rack and said "for what you want THAT is the way to go..." I said to m'self "Redline? What the...?" Well, a wee-bit-o-research later and I'm nearly convinced that Redline IS the way to go; seems to be reasonably well-equipped stock, and the h-bar is right up my retro-alley. Only bummer: they have a 56cm and I'll ride a 58cm. "No problem," says bike dude, "we can have a 58 here in four days."

FOUR DAYS!!?!??!!? Oh my poor, poor wife. She's going to have to put up with me for FOUR DAYS!? (Well, she'll have to put up with me a lot longer than that, but the four days after I order the bike will be especially difficult.)

"We also have a Bianchi San Jose, 58cm" said bike dude. Oh? Oooohhhh......
 

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BozemanboB said:
Anyone looked at Rivendell's Quickbeam? Anyone have one?

Anyway, thanks for your inputs.


BozemanboB

I have one. Been riding fixed for 10+ years. Previously I have ridden a bunch of old italian steel frames (scapin, colnago) and a peugot,and now for 2 years a quickbeam.

Beside all the retro rethorics - this is a brilliantly smart designed bike. It's was made for long distance riding (like all rivs). Most stable ride possible, climbs and descends incredible. Likely not the best bike for a crit. Low BB (75mm drop), longish CS - just typical randoneuring geometry. It has slanting drop outs - so that I can flip my wheel from 15 to 18 without having to adjust brakes (cantis). Quite convenient.

Have ridden it for up to 200 miles fixed, but obviously stronger cyclists ride it for much longer distances. Famous Lon Haldeman rides on it for hundreds of miles (42x14), the current record holder for unsupported PBP, Henry Kingman does as well. Mark has won Master's Cross races on it in the bay area and rode it (single/free) in the cyclocross nationals.

The stock parts are ok. suzue promax free/free hubs, sugion xd2 cranks, Nitto bar/stem/post, shimano cantis and levers. You can buy the frame only and spec it like you want. You get what you pay for. I think the frame is 900, complete bike 1400. For my style of riding (nothing urban, just commutes (40 miles per day) and brevet like stuff) it is perfect.


So, if you are thinkin about riding it longer distances I think the quickbeam (or the made in taiwan copy from Kogswell) are good choices. Not good for the velodrome.

Almost forgot the biggest advantage: comes with a rear brake. Unfortunately, most fixed riders don't understand why 2 brakes are good. Easy - because of your knees! The stress on quads and patella is 3 times greater with deceleration than with acceleration. All the stories about fixed riders and bad knees are overstated but true (Sheldon currently is not riding fixed because of knee issues). So, while I resist to slow down a bit, on downhills when I get passed 150-160 I hit the brakes (plural) rather than abrasing my cartilage.:p

Let me know if you want more info, just PM.

Good Luck. There are many good options.
 

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Thing about the Rivendells is that they are "lifetime" bikes.

BozemanboB said:
Thanks all for your inputs... got me off my retro-grouch duff and looking at the rest of the world. And the real world, too, where bikes are m-u-c-h more affordable.
Those other much lower priced bikes are going to work well for a while but the frames just don't have the construction and materials quality that a Rivendell has. Although at first glance the value of the Redline/Raleigh/Fuji/Bianchi/Giant seems outstanding over time the Rivendell build quality negates the lower prices of the mainstream manufacturers.

If you know you are a lifelong cyclist get the Rivendell; with each year that goes by you will be happier and happier with your purchase.
 

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Qb

Depending on your use, you probably made a good call with the redline, but the QB is a great bike, and not particularly over priced as some above claim.

I like my green one, and the new orange is even tolerable.

 
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