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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im new to the road biking thing and i just setup a road bike for myself.

Where do you want the shifters mounted on the drop bars? In the middle of the curve? DO you want the lever itself to be perpendicular to the ground or do you want the whole assembly up higher so you can take avantage of the hoods as handles?

are there any rules here?

I just taped my bars after the build and realized that i might have them too far into the curve but im new to road biking so perhaps that is the way they are suppose to be. Id imagine you want the ability to brake from the hood and also reach the lever from the curve in the drop position....
 

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brand?

I'll assume Shimano, but their hoods are shaped a lot differently than SRAM or Campy. Regardless of the brands, the transition from the bar to the brake hood must be comfortable to you hand. Campy and SRAM should have a relatively flat transition with the bar and I insist that the portion of the brake hood, where my palms rest be horizontal or angled up a couple of degrees, otherwise your hand will want to slide forward, putting too much pressure on the crook of you thumb. With Shimano, the hood may form more of a V shape.

If you place the shifters too far down on the curve, it increases the drop and reach. Then you'll end up wanting a higher rise stem or more spacer under the stem and a shorter stem. Shimano brake hoods create a longer reach than Campy or SRAM, so you probably don't want to add even more by placing the shifter low on the bars.

Here's a picture of how NOT to do it. The levers aren't really mounted too low (notice the V shape between the bars and brake hood), but the bars are rotated down and these bars also have a lot of rampdown, which places the hoods lower than the top of the bars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes they are shimano sti shifters. My drop bars are about paralell with the ground if not tilted slightly outward.

I think i want to bring my shifters up a bit higher into the upper parts of the curve so i dont have lean quite so far inward to reach the hand position. IM going to try moving my seat forward a bit too and see if that helps at all.
 

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moving the saddle...

While it's OK to move the saddle as a temporary experiment with reach, in the long term, the saddle fore/aft position is supposed to be used to insure the proper knee to pedal relationship and rider weight balance over the saddle. If you have the saddle set properly and find you need less reach, a shorter stem should be used.
 

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I usually take a straight edge and grab it so it stays against the bottom of the bar, then using an 8mm allen, set the bottom of the lever so its barely touching on the flats.

Rotate the bars so that the lowers are pointed towards yer rear hub and presto! comfy.

At least for me. YMMV

M
 

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MShaw said:
I usually take a straight edge and grab it so it stays against the bottom of the bar, then using an 8mm allen, set the bottom of the lever so its barely touching on the flats.
That is the way most bike manufactures do it and the way I learned when working in the shops. Use a straight edge off the bottom part of the drop and put the tip of the lever on the straight edge as well. Sure, this is just a "guideline" but it is a great place to start.
 

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MShaw said:
I usually take a straight edge and grab it so it stays against the bottom of the bar, then using an 8mm allen, set the bottom of the lever so its barely touching on the flats.

Rotate the bars so that the lowers are pointed towards yer rear hub and presto! comfy.

At least for me. YMMV

M
A good, traditional way, but will put the shifters up pretty high, with the levers pointing away from the bars, with many compact or short drop bars.

My drop flats point halfway between rear brake and rear hub (for comfort), and then I set the levers to be pretty much perpendicular, which brings them closest to the bars when I'm in the drops. This is the best compromise between hoods and drops for me.

The ends of levers themselves are then about an inch below the drop flats w/ 135mm drop bars. They were about even with my old full drop bars.
 

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Thanks for this thread. I was going to post about this but used the search function and low and behold there was my answer.

This is my most common battle. As a mountain biker I find I can never quite get used to the position given by the drop bars.

I noticed that a few of the pictures above are low drop bars. Is this throwback thing or is it a re-emerging trend in road bikes? I used low drop/shallow drop bars in the 80's and then deep drops became the norm.

TIA
 

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are FSA Pro Shallows and Pro Compacts same?

In reviewing the FSA bars in the above post and checking out vendors, it seems that the FSA Wing Pro Shallow Bars and the FSA Wing Pro Compact Road bars are very similar. Does anyone know the difference, if any?
 

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pdxtim said:
In reviewing the FSA bars in the above post and checking out vendors, it seems that the FSA Wing Pro Shallow Bars and the FSA Wing Pro Compact Road bars are very similar. Does anyone know the difference, if any?
I see nothing on their webiste that mentions a "shallow" bar. Only Ergo and Compact for the Wing Pro. My assumption is they are the same.
 

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