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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I've been a MTB rider for 8-9 years and just got my first Road bike and have a few simple questions. These may sound lame but being new to the sport and only knowing I can take my mountain bike over just about anything this is a new experience for me. #1 I've just begun riding my new bike and occasionally hit potholes, divets in the road etc. Are road bikes meant to take not necessarily intentional abuse but normal routine day to day abuse? #2 What does everyone use to lube their chain? Lastly is there anything specific anyone could tell me regarding my entry into this excellent crossover. THANKS!!
 

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skipnyamaha said:
Hello, I've been a MTB rider for 8-9 years and just got my first Road bike and have a few simple questions. These may sound lame but being new to the sport and only knowing I can take my mountain bike over just about anything this is a new experience for me. #1 I've just begun riding my new bike and occasionally hit potholes, divets in the road etc. Are road bikes meant to take not necessarily intentional abuse but normal routine day to day abuse? #2 What does everyone use to lube their chain? Lastly is there anything specific anyone could tell me regarding my entry into this excellent crossover. THANKS!!
i hit some potholes - just make sure your rims stay true. You should be okay - until things loosen up. just don't go hitting them all the time! try bunny hopping if you can.
i think you'll be fine for day to day use - just don't try to over abuse.

pedros road rage lube

no idea.
 

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As long as it's not an uber-delicate weight weenie wheel it should take plenty of abuse. I hop curbs, hit potholes(unintentionally) and occasionally ride a wheelie on mine.

You can use the same lube you currently use for your mountain machine, I use white lightning on all of mine and always have.

As a mountain biker who trains on a roadbike myself I suggest just getting out and putting as many hard miles in as you can, you will definitely see results and be a lot faster on both machines.
 

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I see dead people...

skipnyamaha said:
Ok, so the wheels should take some light abuse, now how about the fork. It's a CODA Slice Prodigy, any other info??
Something about your question and followup makes me think you're going to go out and beat that thing until it falls apart, no matter what anybody says, then blame the bike for being cheesy. A good road bike is really durable--I have a steel Trek that's almost 20 years old, was ridden across the country by its previous owner, served as my main bike for five or six years, then got "hybridized" and ridden on fire trails around Reno--and I weigh 240 pounds. It still has the original headset, fork and BB, and had the original derailleurs until I converted it to singlespeed three years ago. My Atlantis (also steel) has done about 10,000 miles in four years, a lot of them in the Sierra Nevada, with just lube and wheel truing. But they're stout bikes to begin with, and I don't crash over curbs or hammer them unnecessarily.
The bottom line is that a road bike isn't as strong as a mountain bike--that's the tradeoff for greater speed. If you ride it like one, it wil break sooner than a mountain bike will. Use the MB for the big air and curb-crashing, and ride the roadie like a road bike.
 

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Ditto - Steel Trek 660, 22 years, same chainrings cassette and ders, same wheels, same headset. New saddle, New brake pads, new pedals, new bar tape and new tires -- all the normal stuff that gets replaced.

Despite it's advanced age the bike is way light and slippery fast compared to my MTB. Liking that a lot . . .



Cory said:
A good road bike is really durable--I have a steel Trek that's almost 20 years old, was ridden across the country by its previous owner, served as my main bike for five or six years, then got "hybridized" and ridden on fire trails around Reno--and I weigh 240 pounds. It still has the original headset, fork and BB, and had the original derailleurs until I converted it to singlespeed three years ago. My Atlantis (also steel) has done about 10,000 miles in four years, a lot of them in the Sierra Nevada, with just lube and wheel truing. But they're stout bikes to begin with, and I don't crash over curbs or hammer them unnecessarily.
The bottom line is that a road bike isn't as strong as a mountain bike--that's the tradeoff for greater speed. If you ride it like one, it wil break sooner than a mountain bike will. Use the MB for the big air and curb-crashing, and ride the roadie like a road bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No WAY!!

Don't take what I say in a way that sounds like I'm gonna trash my bike. Not even close, I was just out riding tonight and hit a few spots and I'm extremely uptight about my stuff. I'm just trying to learn the basics of how careful I need to be with my bike so it WILL last 22 years. I'm sure just like everyone else that for the amount of $$$ we spend on our bikes the last thing we want to do it thrash it. Just trying to learn a little from the guru's of knowledge who can pass a little info onto the greenie.
 

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Its Great

I started about 3 years ago after many years of MTBing. (Wanted to be like Lance). At first the geometry of the bike is feels very weird. In fact the size of the frame is VERY important. I found that out after my lower back started hurting. There is a lot of adjustment of the seatpost, saddle and handlebars before you get that "right fit." As far as the durability, I have a carbon frame and its very durable (I'm 205 lbs century rider). You get lot more flats. I think this is a different kind of ride, you just can't go anywhere with a road bike and if you fall, the pavement is not as forgiving as dirt.
 

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Welcome to the world of road biking!

#1: The bike will be fine. Just make sure you have wheels that are properly tensioned and stress-relieved. If you have a lower-end road bike, chances are the wheels are poorly built, and you may start breaking spokes within the first few hundred miles. If they're properly tensioned, then they should easily last for thousands of miles, and they'll stay more true.

#2: I use finish line dry lube, which stays pretty clean but needs reapplication every 30-50 miles or so in dry conditions. In the rain, it washes out very quickly. I believe Pedro's dry lube is similar.
 

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I live in Colorado Springs and we have our road issues here too. But I haven’t encountered any of the regular stuff that would damage a bicycle (well, yet anyway). The construction of the bicycle seems to be like an airplane – really strong where it needs to be in the directions/loads that are expected. But, do something out of the design envelope and you’re looking for trouble. For example, loading the wheels sideways instead of on the tires (like stepping on your wheel spokes wouldn’t be a good thing to do).

I’ve been riding now for about two years (complete noo-bee). In the last two years I put about 4,000 miles on my bike. I’ve a bunch of riding – long, short, dirt road, alligator skin (i.e., severely cracked asphalt), and other stuff that I “encountered” at the last minute. No real big problems, except a wheel issue (see below). The biggest thing I have found in this time of riding is that the gears can get really finicky. Keep your chain clean and lubed and you shouldn’t have any issues – and replace the chain when it gets worn/stretched.

As far as the “normal” potholes and road damage, I’ve done my share of running over this stuff (not intentionally) and the bike doesn’t seem any worse for the wear. I’d slow down for RR crossings and cattle guards – it just doesn’t seem right that you’d want to hit that stuff at any kind of speed. Or, riding fast through any kind of rough stuff. Some other observations:

1) Watch your rims. I rode up Mt. Hamilton (in California – 44 miles with 4,200 feet of climbing) a few weeks back and on the way down, about a mile from the summit, I noticed my back wheel acting strange (out of true). Turned out to be the spokes coming out of the rim (cracks in 5 or 6 places where the spokes meet the rim). Bummer. All the uphill and no downhill payoff. (Unhappy!) Trek said they couldn’t do anything (out of warranty, no “crash” program for the wheels). At least I didn’t experience the wheel falling apart, doing a self-destruct at 40 MPH . Upset but not too bitter – it could have been a lot worse. (Old wheels: Came with the bike Trek Pilot 5.0 -- Bontrager Race. New Wheels: Mavic Ksyrium ES’s – they’re nice!)
2) Keep your bike clean and look for obvious cracks and damage before you start off on your rides.
3) Do some bolt maintenance too. Stuff gets loose. Make sure it’s all snug and tight.
4) Maintain the proper tire pressure. At least you won’t have to worry about pinch flats then.

Happy riding!
 

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Get a good set of handbuilt wheels like Mavic Open Pros/Velocity Arrowhead laced to Ultegra/Centaur hubs with Dt Swiss/Wheelsmith/Sapim spokes built by a reputable builder and you will have an extremely durable set of wheels that can easily be trued and repaired if needs be although you'd have to hit some bad-ass potholes to get them out of whack. Otherwise life expectancy on road parts is longer than on MTB parts, road parts are more expensive though so that'll porbably more or less level out. Frames and forks last as long as you don't SERIOUSLY crash.
 

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Fat Guy in a Little Coat
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skipnyamaha said:
Hello, I've been a MTB rider for 8-9 years and just got my first Road bike and have a few simple questions. These may sound lame but being new to the sport and only knowing I can take my mountain bike over just about anything this is a new experience for me. #1 I've just begun riding my new bike and occasionally hit potholes, divets in the road etc. Are road bikes meant to take not necessarily intentional abuse but normal routine day to day abuse? #2 What does everyone use to lube their chain? Lastly is there anything specific anyone could tell me regarding my entry into this excellent crossover. THANKS!!
1) Ditto to what most have posted...road bikes are extremely durable. Hitting a pothole or two shouldn't cause a problem. If you don't have a truing stand, sight true by using your brake pads.

2) Pro Link Gold - by far the best lube I've used.

3) Keep your drivetrain clean...it will greatly extend the life of your chain, cassette, and chainrings. I clean the chain approx every 300 miles or so. About once a month I tear the bike apart and give it a good cleaning.
 

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One more tip: Listen to your bike. If you hit a pothole and something makes a rice-krispy-related sound (snap, crack, pop), stop and check for cracks or other damage. This happened to me twice: once on the Rosarito-Ensenada ride in Mexico, and once recently after going unexpectedly off a curb at ~20mph. End result was a cracked stem.

You definitely want to find any damage before it finds you. As someone said earlier, road crashes tend to be less frequent than mtb crashes, but you're usually moving a lot faster, and over a harder, more abrasive surface.
 

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I don't hesitate to take my roadbike (stock cannondale r700) over fairly smooth single track. I just pick my lines better to avoid the big rocks and don't hit anything head on, and the bike is holding up fine. Maybe not recommended behavior, but for me it builds a lot of confidence, is a lot of fun (you get some strange looks), and the bike takes it without any problems YMMV.
 
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