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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a USA Cycling Cat 1 mtb license. I've won a few expert races in the past. Does this apply at all to road categories?
 

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waterproof*
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nope, sorry. we have a guy in our club with the same situation; he had to do his 10 cat 5 races and is now racing 4's, working his way up.

you'll do great, from a strength perspective. road tactics are a bit of a different animal though, so it's good to get experience and learn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Creakyknees said:
nope, sorry. we have a guy in our club with the same situation; he had to do his 10 cat 5 races and is now racing 4's, working his way up.

you'll do great, from a strength perspective. road tactics are a bit of a different animal though, so it's good to get experience and learn.
Maybe you can explain how crits work too.

It's a "miss and out" format, right? That is if you get lapped you get pulled.

What I'm asking is, if I lap the entire field, I win. Correct or no?
 

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waterproof*
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No. On the road, it's always "first to finish the distance", so even if you solo lap the field, you still have to complete the race before you're the winner.

In a crit, it's up to promoter / official discretion whether to pull lapped riders. Usually it'll say on the race flyer, or the official will mention it during his start-line briefing.

On the track, there are a variety of events, one of which is miss and out, but that's a different format that you described.
 

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Anti-Hero
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To add to what Creaky said-
If you get dropped and lapped, that often means that you'll get pulled (in some bigger crits, you'll get pulled when you're dropped enough to be considered "out of contention", but then in some smaller races, lapped riders aren't pulled, even if they get lapped repeatedly- it's up to the people in charge of the race to decide that ahead of time and tell the racers at the start line).

If you go off the front or lap the field, then you'll get first place as long as you finish. Everyone else is racing for second place.

If you and a group breaks away and laps the field, then you are sprinting against the guys who are in your breakaway group. In that case, if you have teammates that are not in the breakaway, then they can try and help you by giving you a leadout for the sprint.
 

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As others have stated...you have to start out as a CAT 5 on the road and either take a couple of top 5's or race your 10 races to move up to CAT 4, then to move to CAT 3 you have to acquire the needed number of points or races...and so on.

Last year I was an Expert (CAT 1) MTB racer but a CAT 5 road and moved to CAT 4 road. Now I'm CAT 3 on the road and CAT 1 MTB.

There is at least one guy around here that races Pro class MTB and is still a CAT 4 on the road. He only does a couple of road races a year and beats the crap out of the other 4's when he does race, but never accumulates enough points to move up beyond the 4's on the road.
 

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Rocket Scientist
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This is a little confusing. I thought that they would make him race at least Cat 3 on the road. I have never raced a real mtb race but they put my MTB category as Cat 2. Why are they not consistent with this stuff?
 

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Dweebus Maximus
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Sherpa23 said:
This is a little confusing. I thought that they would make him race at least Cat 3 on the road. I have never raced a real mtb race but they put my MTB category as Cat 2. WTF? Anyone have any idea on that?
Not that I really have any clue, but from a logical perspective you're not a danger to anyone else in MTB if they move you up beyond the beginner category right from the start. It's a given that your fitness will be way beyond the requirements for Cat 3 MTTB, uand even if your technical abilities blow you're likely to affect only yourself. That's Unlike road racing, where it's really almost a necessity to get used to racing within a group regardless of fitness, to reduce risk to you and those around you.
 

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This is the first year of numbered cats in mtb racing. They used to be called Beginner, Sport, Expert, and Pro.

Beginner -> Cat 3
Sport -> Cat 2
Expert -> Cat 1

AFAIK you don't even need to race a single race to race Sport (cat 2).

In mtb racing you are only a real danger to yourself, maybe a minor annoyance to others,
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Training Partners

hllclmbr said:
Maybe you can explain how crits work too...
You should be asking the roadies that you train with. If you are not training on the road with other racers and developing some pack skills you may be able to drop the beginners but could be a danger once you are in packs of similar speed. In the higher categories the other racers will beat you with strategy rather than their legs. This may be part of the reason the categories do not transfer between disciplines - safety of the pack - other racers want to know they are racing with someone who has some pack experience.

There is a lot more to racing than pedaling fast unless you are doing time trials.
 

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pretender said:
This is the first year of numbered cats in mtb racing. They used to be called Beginner, Sport, Expert, and Pro.

Beginner -> Cat 3
Sport -> Cat 2
Expert -> Cat 1

AFAIK you don't even need to race a single race to race Sport (cat 2).

In mtb racing you are only a real danger to yourself, maybe a minor annoyance to others,
Okay, that explains a lot. I thought that they had 5 categories, too. I was thinking about trying a mountain bike race if I didn't have to start out at such a high level. Maybe sport isn't all that high, although I wouldn't mind trying beginner so that I could get my legs under me.
 

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Captain Obvious
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Sherpa23 said:
Okay, that explains a lot. I thought that they had 5 categories, too. I was thinking about trying a mountain bike race if I didn't have to start out at such a high level. Maybe sport isn't all that high, although I wouldn't mind trying beginner so that I could get my legs under me.
if you race road and have even moderate skills on the bike, you'll be fine in CAT 2/sport. Just my .02.
 

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Loves to Suffer
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hllclmbr said:
Maybe you can explain how crits work too.

It's a "miss and out" format, right? That is if you get lapped you get pulled.

What I'm asking is, if I lap the entire field, I win. Correct or no?
Well, you're not lacking for confidence. But I wouldn't count on going out and lapping the field, even with superior fitness.
 

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tomk96 said:
if you race road and have even moderate skills on the bike, you'll be fine in CAT 2/sport. Just my .02.
I suppose but it doesn't matter how fast you are if you've fallen off the trail and are spread out face down the dirt while everyone else rides by to the finish. That's my .02.

I have excellent bike handling skills on the road and the track but I think that mtb stuff is a whole different ball game. Regardless of the gaps I can squeeze my handlebars into in a crit or how many races I win on the road, I have no illusions that if I did a mountain bike race, the skills that I would need to win on the dirt would be worlds away from what I have. And before people start crying out about the sandbagging pro in a sport race, I am pretty confident that if I won, I would barely squeak by after multiple, multiple get-offs.
 

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Wookiebiker said:
There is at least one guy around here that races Pro class MTB and is still a CAT 4 on the road. He only does a couple of road races a year and beats the crap out of the other 4's when he does race, but never accumulates enough points to move up beyond the 4's on the road.
Ouch - all the cat 4's must love him for that :p
 

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Sherpa23 said:
Okay, that explains a lot. I thought that they had 5 categories, too. I was thinking about trying a mountain bike race if I didn't have to start out at such a high level. Maybe sport isn't all that high, although I wouldn't mind trying beginner so that I could get my legs under me.
If you're a cat 1 on the road, you'll destroy sport (cat 2) races.

Last year I entered a sport mountain bike race and a cat 2 roadie for a regional u23 Colvita squad showed up. We started behind the singlespeed racers, who got a minute head start. He had passed all of them by half way through the first lap. Won the race overall by two minutes. Putting you with beginners would be brutal.

(FWIW, I held his wheel as long as I could and lost only 15 sec to him on the first lap, but it was all downhill from there.)
 

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So this thread has inspired me.

If there is no change to our season schedule, I am going to do the Firecracker 50 over the 4th of July.

In the meantime, I need to buy a mountain bike...
 

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As the others have said, it's all about the motor and if you've got a pro license then you've got the motor.

Hillclimbr, You will likely not have to race 10 cat. 5 races to upgrade to 4, I didn't. I was an Expert class MTB racer (not a very good one) and got a 4th in my 2nd road race so the district rep let me upgrade (placing/winning does count). If you're not familiar with road racing I strongly suggest you get in with the local road group rides and get used to pack riding. There's a lot to learn and you'll find that in road racing, there really isn't a "beginner" class. You'll be surprised by how strong even cat. 4 riders can be and if you don't bring in a little bit of pack skill you will be surprised with how hard it is. Position and draft is what it's all about. A racer that masters that will seem a WHOLE lot stronger than they really are.
 

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davidka said:
As the others have said, it's all about the motor and if you've got a pro license then you've got the motor.
I am sure that is not going to be anything easy. I will try my hardest to do well but I don't have any expectations. I just want to stay upright and limit the amount of time I spend off the bike. I figure I am going to be on the ground a bunch anyway. It's a long way off. I can probably get in one or two rides before, depending on when I get a mtb.
 
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