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· HyTek *******
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26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the advantages of the road shoe/pedal combo over a mtn shoe/pedal combo? I came from the mtn, and figured since I already had the shoes (Shimano SH-M2** not sure but they're @ 4 yrs old w/ composite) I'd stick with them. It seems like a wicked stiff shoe, so what would I gain from a road shoe that I can't walk in comfortably? Enquirer minds want to know...
 

· Resident Curmudgeon
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13,390 Posts
The only difference is probably style. Your pedals / shoes should work just fine on either bike.
 

· Registered
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35 Posts
Mr. Versatile said:
The only difference is probably style. Your pedals / shoes should work just fine on either bike.

The difference definitely goes beyond style.

Most road shoes aren't intended for much walking in them, unlike MTB shoes which at least provide you with an outsole that has some traction. As such, the road shoe generally is lighter.

Another difference is ventilation. Road shoes generally provide better ventilation since they have lighter uppers and more openings, including some in the sole. It would be nuts to put a hole in the sole of a MTB shoe, given the environment it is intended for.

Similarly with the pedals. MTB pedals are designed with mud and dirt shedding ability in mind. This is not the case with road pedals which are designed more for lightness and to provide a lower profile which puts your foot closer to the pedal axis and is more aerodynamic.

I also would expect road shoes as a whole to have stiffer soles than MTB shoes.

Keep in mind the general differences of each type of riding:

Road - higher speeds, more uninterrupted smoother pedalling at higher cadences possible, no dirt/mud to speak of

MTB - lower speeds, harsher environment, more frequent changes in rider's position and pedalling, lower cadences

Finally, this does not mean you can't use a MTB pedal on a road bike. That may be fine for many people and generally works OK, even though it is not quite optimal. However, you really don't want to put a road pedal on a MTB. If you do you'll notice how easilly the pedal becomes clogged with debris and becomes inoperative.
 
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