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Banned Sock Puppet
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This is a good argument for taking the lane, maneuvering room. It's mighty handy to have options when riding in traffic and the ability to dodge an obstacle to the right, away from traffic, can be life saving.
Granted this is true. But regardless, I hit that pothole with both of my tubed 28mm tires and suffered no pinch flats. The tubeless guy behind me had damage to the sidewalls of both tires and had to call Uber.
 

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This is a good argument for taking the lane, maneuvering room. It's mighty handy to have options when riding in traffic and the ability to dodge an obstacle to the right, away from traffic, can be life saving.
“Taking the lane” is this mythical plea not to be run over by a car. I’ll do it, but it’s rare as hell. And I’m polite about it. I hit nasty pot holes because I can’t avoid them. It’s just a part of where I ride. Never had it give me a flat or damage my wheels. But “taking the lane” where I ride is pretty much suicide unless it’s done carefully and respectfully of drivers.


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“Taking the lane” is this mythical plea not to be run over by a car.


nothing 'mythical' about it, do it at some point on every ride.

not going to put myself in a situation where some nitwit is going to try and squeeze between me and parked cars on both sides of a narrow street.
 

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Yeah, parked cars is def a good example. You can’t her doored... I’ll do it in that instance, but sometimes I’ll slow up to time my passing a long row of parked care to let the cars behind pass me. Standing water on the side of the road is another time I have no choice.... I do find that when it’s obvious why I’m in the middle of the lane that drivers are pretty courteous. But again, I don’t do it often and for good reason.


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Yes, I will definitely take the full lane where there are parallel parked cars on the street. I still shake my head when I see all the club riders who hug the parked car doors.

But in general, I ride to the left of the fog line in the right car tire track.
 

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I call taking the right tire track taking the lane. To be passed when riding there the passing vehicle is going to need to cross the lane marker. Ride closer to the fog line, or curb, and a motorist may pass and not cross the lane marker crowding the cyclist into the curb or off the road.

Taking the lane just means not leaving enough room to be passed by a vehicle that isn't willing to cross the lane marker/center line.
 

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Taking the lane just means not leaving enough room to be passed by a vehicle that isn't willing to cross the lane marker/center line.
Hmmm. I have always thought the term "taking the lane" means riding in the middle of the lane so if a car tries to pass you, they will not only have to cross the yellow line, but drive in the oncoming lane the same way they would when passing another car.
 

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Part of the problem is the ever-present lack of standards, which results in poorly designed tubeless rim profiles. I've used Road Tubeless (as branded by Easton, who do a good job) with Specialized and more recently, Conti tires for many years and can't recall any issues. GP5000 TLs don't lock in as securely as Specialized, I guess, but they're far more stout. The Specialized tires, on the other hand, have great bead retention, so if you're lazy like me, you can ride a totally flat tire for miles and it stays put. Also, as has been said, get a flat? Put in a tube, though I can't recall ever doing that. Once the initial run of tubeless sealant takes care of any small leaks and dries, I usually just leave it dry for the duration, maybe topping it up annually with an ounce so I feel better about myself. It's easier that way, and at least where I live and ride, punctures aren't really a thing. Tube snakebites used to be though. The benefit for me is pinch flat protection and increased ride comfort, as I like to do fun, sometimes rough non-road things with my road bike.

I think part of the "OMG tubeless is so hard!" is a bit like those infomercials where people catch their kitchen on fire trying to slice a tomato, then comically throw up their hands waiting for a solution... which is #teamtubeinside. But it doesn't have to be that hard. Is there a benefit over tubes for everybody like there is in MTBing? No, but if you get the right products, it works just fine.
 

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Hmmm. I have always thought the term "taking the lane" means riding in the middle of the lane so if a car tries to pass you, they will not only have to cross the yellow line, but drive in the oncoming lane the same way they would when passing another car.
A problem that I have with riding in the middle of the lane is automotive oil leaks. Any motor oil/transmission leaks are going to be deposited in the middle of the lane, creating possible slick spots and/or oil deposits on the bicycles tires, which could come into play on a sewer cover or at a RailRoad Xing. Not only, as a habit, do I avoid riding over paint stripes and sewer covers, but I also cross RR Xings at as near to 90deg. as possible, always treating these surfaces as if they were slick with water.

Sorry for the thread drift.
 

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don't take this the wrong way, but you need better riding skills. Been riding since the 90s, with lots of times in large group high speed descents, countless times in large 40-50 rider peloton hammering full gas, and I've never ever seen anyone flat both front and rear from hitting any one obstacle on the road. Usually guys will at least manage to lift the front up at the very last minute but flat the rear, never both.
I did exactly that last Sunday. Somebody called a hole too late, I could not avoid it, pinch flated F & R. Ive never done that, hell I think the last pinch flat I had was 20 -25 years ago, on a fast team training ride.

Ive been road riding, including racing, since '89 so am not inexperienced, stuff happens is all,
 

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How many times have you removed your tire or put a tube in "on the road"?
... and not everyone has easton rims.
Your last line is sort of my point. Like anything, buy the proper equipment (which can be hard to do, sure). I've also had good luck with Mavic. I'd think most rims with an inner bead hump are fine, as that's what keeps the tire from burping at lower pressure and on the rim with no pressure.

What's different about installing a tube/tubeless tire on the road or in the garage? I can't recall ever doing that on a tubeless road ride, but if I did, I'd either use my fingers on something like the Turbo 28 or a plastic tire tool for the last couple of inches of a tighter tire like a 32 GP5000, just like I do at home. It's not like replacing a tube in the GP4000s that I used before wasn't a bitch. Or shove a tire patch in the hole, top up the air, and continue with the ride, but that's never happened either.

Anyway, I'm not saying that everybody should go tubeless, just that people using bad components are going to have a bad experience. Hopefully the industry will figure that out sooner rather than later, at least for those that want to go that route.
 

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What's different about installing a tube/tubeless tire on the road or in the garage?
It's easier on the road.
When installing them in the garage, they're new tires (hard to get on). Need a compressor to seat the bead.

On the road... when my tires are used I can get them on by hand or 1 lever to get the last inch. And since you're using a tube, no need for a compressor.
IOW... no big deal.
 

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It's easier on the road.
When installing them in the garage, they're new tires (hard to get on). Need a compressor to seat the bead.

On the road... when my tires are used I can get them on by hand or 1 lever to get the last inch. And since you're using a tube, no need for a compressor.
IOW... no big deal.
True, new tires are harder. The compressor is typically only necessary for MTB tires... remove the valve core + floor pump + soapy water spray on the bead works for the rest. I've been really impressed with the GP5000s in that regard. They hardly even need sealant. That's one benefit of a 400g 32mm road tire, I guess.

Anyway, a lever in a garage or a lever on the side of the road is the same thing, unless the lever in your bag is less effective than the one in your garage. It's even easier if you use co2 vs. a floor pump in the garage. Do you mean that it sucks, generally, to put in a tube on the side of the road/trail/whatever due to weather/sweat/whatever? If so, then yes, that sucks and it's preferable to do in a garage. That's why I switched to, er, tubeless.
 

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The compressor is typically only necessary for MTB tires... remove the valve core + floor pump + soapy water spray on the bead works for the rest.
You can seat road tires with a floor pump? I couldn't.
But I never bothered with soapy water. Hit it with the compressor and pop... bobs your uncle. 10 seconds and your done.

I've been really impressed with the GP5000s in that regard. They hardly even need sealant.
Yea, they've got great beads on them. I've had them sit inflated over night with no sealant.
 

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You can seat road tires with a floor pump? I couldn't.
But I never bothered with soapy water. Hit it with the compressor and pop... bobs your uncle. 10 seconds and your done.

Yea, they've got great beads on them. I've had them sit inflated over night with no sealant.
Yeah, it works with a pump, but the compressor is definitely faster. I only have a 1 gallon, and it's a bit noisy and slow to fill. So I usually try the floor pump first. The best is co2 though. poof

While we're talking about tubeless, why did Easton and Mavic get rid of solid rim beds? That's one more variable to not worry about, plus it makes for a stronger rim. Oh well.
 
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